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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
I’m looking to buy a 30kwh 2017 Nissan Leaf with 27,000 miles. I’m buying it from a Nissan dealership, I’ve asked to see the state of health I.e the battery percentage remaining, the car has a full 12 bars but I’m aware this only means somewhere from 86-100% remaining. The dealership has sent me a generic battery health review but doesn’t specify the soh. I’ve asked for the percentage but they’re unable to produce it. Is this normal? Thanks
 

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ONTO/Evezy £50 Code: CADA7
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The only way you can really see it more accurately is with the use of the LEAFspy app with an OBD Dongle, which the dealer may or may not be happy to allow you to use on their car. The battery report you are talking about is the standard one used within Nissan and is the best you'll get from them.

Being realistic, you're probably looking at a SOH in the low 90's or maybe even dipping just a little below that. That's where the majority of 30kWh LEAFs now are, even if they have been fairly well looked after. If you're fine with that then I would say go ahead with it and anything extra is a bonus. If you're not ok with that then the LEAF Probably isn't the right car for you if you really need that extra range, since they are the worst for battery degradation thanks to the lack of active cooling system.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The only way you can really see it more accurately is with the use of the LEAFspy app with an OBD Dongle, which the dealer may or may not be happy to allow you to use on their car. The battery report you are talking about is the standard one used within Nissan and is the best you'll get from them.

Being realistic, you're probably looking at a SOH in the low 90's or maybe even dipping just a little below that. That's where the majority of 30kWh LEAFs now are, even if they have been fairly well looked after. If you're fine with that then I would say go ahead with it and anything extra is a bonus. If you're not ok with that then the LEAF Probably isn't the right car for you if you really need that extra range, since they are the worst for battery degradation thanks to the lack of active cooling system.
Thanks for that information.
I’ve also seen conflicting reports of the range, the dealer quoted 110 miles which I know is not accurate in a 3 year old 30kwh leaf. Suppose the soh is 90% and I shouldn’t really run below 20% charge, what is the realistic motorway miles for the leaf, driving 60mph?
 

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ONTO/Evezy £50 Code: CADA7
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Thanks for that information.
I’ve also seen conflicting reports of the range, the dealer quoted 110 miles which I know is not accurate in a 3 year old 30kwh leaf. Suppose the soh is 90% and I shouldn’t really run below 20% charge, what is the realistic motorway miles for the leaf, driving 60mph?
At 60ish on the motorway you should still manage 1% = 1 Mile in average weather, slightly better during the summer, and then as the weather changes to cold, wet and windy this will get worse. It hugely varies depending on things like weather conditons, the road, your tyre pressures, how warm you prefer your car and if you preheated it etc.

Do you have a certain journey in your mind that you would like to be sure you can complete with this car? If you're happy to share approximate locations other owners may behappy to chime in with their opinions of how well the route suits the car. You could also check out ABRP where you can make it take into account things like weather conditions and battery degradation, to get a good idea of what a longer journey may look like with such a car.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
For myself in the short term I’ll be driving 80 miles return per day on motorways and upto 20 when I arrive at work, so I know I’ll need to stop and quick charge at least once everyday. But in the long term my husband will be driving it 88 miles return every day, but with charging available at either end. So I’m assuming it should be able to do him for commuting to work for the foreseeable future, even in winter, with the heating on full blast etc, until the battery is seriously degraded.
 

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Got a 2016 in the family with slightly lower mileage and 1 mile per 1% is about right. As usual winter and speed are your enemy. Our car has been protected from rapid charging which is generally a good thing. It’s great for doing a specific job ie a limited daily mileage.
 

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For myself in the short term I’ll be driving 80 miles return per day on motorways and upto 20 when I arrive at work, so I know I’ll need to stop and quick charge at least once everyday. But in the long term my husband will be driving it 88 miles return every day, but with charging available at either end. So I’m assuming it should be able to do him for commuting to work for the foreseeable future, even in winter, with the heating on full blast etc, until the battery is seriously degraded.
Cycling the battery like that you can expect to see quite steady deterioration. While the car may suit you initially, you're going to be tight for range in a couple of years, especially in cold, wet or windy weather. We went looking for a Leaf30, when I had a Leaf24, and bought an Ioniq 28. Far better tech and will fit your needs better, you won't be stopping for charging every day, for one thing. Its such a good car that we had two for a while. Available from £14k now, a bargain. Lots on my blog about the Ioniq.
 

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Nissan Leaf Accenta 30kWh, 3.3kW, 2017
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I bought a 2017 Leaf30 a few months ago and was able to get 105 miles and still have around 15% left. However, that was in summer and my commute is only 10 miles each way on 30-50mph speed limits. From what I have heard, and as mentioned above, the Ioniq is far more efficient for motorway driving, so I would have a good look into that instead if you can afford it.
 

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Thanks for that information.
I’ve also seen conflicting reports of the range, the dealer quoted 110 miles which I know is not accurate in a 3 year old 30kwh leaf. Suppose the soh is 90% and I shouldn’t really run below 20% charge, what is the realistic motorway miles for the leaf, driving 60mph?
My 30kWh Leaf has just turned four, is at around 92% SoH and I can manage about 100 miles at 60mph driving carefully in summer. At city speeds it would easily do more than 110 miles so they are perhaps quoting city driving which is probably what demonstrators are doing.

Remember to factor in a loss of up to 20% or so for winter.
 

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Cycling the battery like that you can expect to see quite steady deterioration. While the car may suit you initially, you're going to be tight for range in a couple of years, especially in cold, wet or windy weather.
Completely agree. An 88 mile daily motorway commute on a Leaf 30 is going to stress the battery a lot due to running it down so low so regularly. (Not to mention stressing the driver due to range anxiety)

In the winter 88 miles is probably not possible at all without stopping to charge. If this is the required use pattern a different car with significantly longer range should be chosen, probably a minimum of 40kWh. The Leaf 30 is not the right car for this commute.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Completely agree. An 88 mile daily motorway commute on a Leaf 30 is going to stress the battery a lot due to running it down so low so regularly. (Not to mention stressing the driver due to range anxiety)

In the winter 88 miles is probably not possible at all without stopping to charge. If this is the required use pattern a different car with significantly longer range should be chosen, probably a minimum of 40kWh. The Leaf 30 is not the right car for this commute.
Sorry I don’t think I explained it very well, it’s 88 miles return, so 44 to work, then plug in at work and charge all day, and then 44 miles back home, where it can charge overnight. Almost all of the way on motorways. Fuel is going to cost £250+ a month on the current car, hence needing something more viable.
thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Cycling the battery like that you can expect to see quite steady deterioration. While the car may suit you initially, you're going to be tight for range in a couple of years, especially in cold, wet or windy weather. We went looking for a Leaf30, when I had a Leaf24, and bought an Ioniq 28. Far better tech and will fit your needs better, you won't be stopping for charging every day, for one thing. Its such a good car that we had two for a while. Available from £14k now, a bargain. Lots on my blog about the Ioniq.
Had a look there but very limited choice here in Northern Ireland, only three cars and all around 25K, could go over to mainland but part exchanging current car so not as simple as buying with cash. Looks like a great car tho.
 

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88 miles return, so 44 to work, then plug in at work and charge all day, and then 44 miles back home, where it can charge overnight. Almost all of the way on motorways
That wouldn't be any problem at all in a LEAF 30 with 90% SOH battery.
 

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Sorry I don’t think I explained it very well, it’s 88 miles return, so 44 to work, then plug in at work and charge all day, and then 44 miles back home, where it can charge overnight. Almost all of the way on motorways. Fuel is going to cost £250+ a month on the current car, hence needing something more viable.
thanks
If you have guaranteed Level 2 charging at work for it to recharge during the day then you would be OK. You're only discharging the battery about half way each way so not harmful to the battery and you would also have a decent range buffer each way even in winter especially if you keep your speed down a bit on the motorway.

Just keep in mind that you're setting yourself up to be dependent on that work charging - if charging at work ever becomes infeasible (chargers break down, too many other employees fighting to use the same chargers as more get EV's, change of management who decide they won't be offering charging anymore etc) then you could be in a bit of a bind and come to rely on public rapid chargers to get home.

As someone who had to stop to rapid charge on the way home every night last winter in my previous shorter range EV I can assure you you get fed up with charging on the way home very quickly even though my top up was only for 10 minutes and my total journey was half yours... it was one of the factors that pushed me to finally replace it with a longer range Leaf which does my entire commute with about 67% battery left. (In summer anyway, probably 50% in winter)

What sort of charging facilities do they have at work ? Are they proper 3.6 or 7.2kW Type 2 charging sockets and do they have enough of them to go around that you won't be playing musical chairs with other employees in a couple of years time ?
 

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I run a similar commute with mine. its about 39miles each way. All motorway, usually flowing well and doing 70mph. In summer, on a good day, i'll arrive at work with 50% left. mid 40's is more typical with standard scottish weather, and it'll be well down in the 30's for the worst winter days. If you have solid workplace charging, then you'll be totally fine, but your not managing that commute without charging unless you drive really slowly.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
If you have guaranteed Level 2 charging at work for it to recharge during the day then you would be OK. You're only discharging the battery about half way each way so not harmful to the battery and you would also have a decent range buffer each way even in winter especially if you keep your speed down a bit on the motorway.

Just keep in mind that you're setting yourself up to be dependent on that work charging - if charging at work ever becomes infeasible (chargers break down, too many other employees fighting to use the same chargers as more get EV's, change of management who decide they won't be offering charging anymore etc) then you could be in a bit of a bind and come to rely on public rapid chargers to get home.

As someone who had to stop to rapid charge on the way home every night last winter in my previous shorter range EV I can assure you you get fed up with charging on the way home very quickly even though my top up was only for 10 minutes and my total journey was half yours... it was one of the factors that pushed me to finally replace it with a longer range Leaf which does my entire commute with about 67% battery left. (In summer anyway, probably 50% in winter)

What sort of charging facilities do they have at work ? Are they proper 3.6 or 7.2kW Type 2 charging sockets and do they have enough of them to go around that you won't be playing musical chairs with other employees in a couple of years time ?
Thanks for the info, they have two 22kw type 2 chargers, hidden around the back of the mortuary (I work at a hospital) that nobody seems to ever use or know exist. I’ve checked they’re working, and run off an app called eo.

Worst case scenario they’re broke/in use and I’ll have to stop at a rapid charger on the way home to top up the battery. However with being an nhs nurse on a rubbish salary I literally cannot afford to be putting in £250+ of fuel in my car every month to get to work so this will hopefully allow me to keep the job I love and not break the bank.
I’ve ordered an obd2 connector and purchased leafspy to get the soh of this leaf I’ve reserved for next weekend. What is the soh I should be looking for on a three year old 27,000 mile 30kwh leaf?
thanks
 

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Thanks for the info, they have two 22kw type 2 chargers, hidden around the back of the mortuary (I work at a hospital) that nobody seems to ever use or know exist. I’ve checked they’re working, and run off an app called eo.

Worst case scenario they’re broke/in use and I’ll have to stop at a rapid charger on the way home to top up the battery. However with being an nhs nurse on a rubbish salary I literally cannot afford to be putting in £250+ of fuel in my car every month to get to work so this will hopefully allow me to keep the job I love and not break the bank.
I’ve ordered an obd2 connector and purchased leafspy to get the soh of this leaf I’ve reserved for next weekend. What is the soh I should be looking for on a three year old 27,000 mile 30kwh leaf?
thanks
This is almost a how long is a piece of string question. My 2017 30k Leaf has a SoH of just over 98pc, and until earlier this year, bizarrely, was over 100pc. It's done just over 30,000 miles. I do drive it carefully, no blatting down the motorway at 70/75, so maybe this battery longevity is my reward

Screenshot_20201002-174336.png
 

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This is almost a how long is a piece of string question. My 2017 30k Leaf has a SoH of just over 98pc, and until earlier this year, bizarrely, was over 100pc. It's done just over 30,000 miles. I do drive it carefully, no blatting down the motorway at 70/75, so maybe this battery longevity is my reward

View attachment 135625
That looks quite exceptional. My 3 year old Leaf 30 had a SOH of about 90% when I sold it to my brother. For general motoring my overall was 3.9miles/kWhr, and I reckoned my safe range was around 80 miles. The use being described would not rely wholly on the workplace chargers being available. A 6 hour charge with a granny lead would give 2x3.9x6=47 miles, so the user should be secure. Consumption will depend very much how hilly the motorways are. I find the long slow hills on the M54 and top of the M5 are really damaging to economy- and that also applies to my new Leaf e+, which otherwise manages to eat the miles better at motorway speeds.
 

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I find the long slow hills on the M54 and top of the M5 are really damaging to economy-
While going up hills can eat into the %SOC, I find I get most of it back when going in the opposite direction. Where my destination is higher than my starting point, I find I need (for my 13 Reg 24kWh Leaf) to allow an extra 3% SOC for every 100m overall height difference.
 
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