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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've currently got a 2017 Leaf Tekna 30kwh and have always wanted to upgrade to an Ioniq 28kwh but have found an Ioniq premium 38kwh for around £21K which to me is a bargain but would require finding £12K to upgrade. I'd be interested in peoples views whether they would go for it or hang on for longer until say Kona 64kwh drop more in value or Ioniqs themselves drop as the new 5 comes out later in the year. Thanks.
 

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I weighed up the pros/cons of the 28 vs 38 and decided that the additional range of the 38 versus the slower rapid charging time of the 38 meant it made more sense, for me, to go for the 28. The times when I need to stop for a break coincides nicely with when the 28 needs a charge stop. The 28 is cheaper to buy and also I preferred the hard buttons for climate on the 28.
 

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2020 Ioniq 38 2016 Leaf 30 gone
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A month ago I traded in my Leaf 30 for an Ioniq 38, apart from the added expense I’m not regretting anything. The range comfort and added features over the Leaf make it worthwhile for me, and the slower rapid charging over the 28 doesn’t really bother me as I’m no road warrior.
 

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The Ioniq 38s may be subject to a recall at some unknown date in the future, to swap the entire battery. Depending on which factory made it. All a bit vague at the mo', but £21K sounds like an earlier one like mine (registered in Sep 2019), that's got a VIN in the "suspect" band. We're being asked to restrict charging to 90% SOC for now, until we hear further news, plus there's a sweetner of some cash on the Charge myHyundai app to compensate (not sure how much; ?£50? dunno).

Suspect batteries went onto Ioniqs built between May 2 2019 & Nov 30 2019.
The Ioniq 28 is unaffected, no probs with them.

IONIQ EV PE (AEEV): From KMHC851JULU053116 To KMHC851JULU065256

No Ioniqs have caught fire as far as we know, and only about 18 of many thousands more Konas built. So very rare.

You may want to check the VIN before buying, if the restricted range worries you. Otherwise, grab a great car, maybe use this info to reduce the price a bit more, sign up for the sweetner if car turns out to need new battery, and look forwards to a better, newer, fresher battery in a year or so!

I guess an Ioniq registered mid-2020 onwards probably post-dates the fixing of the problem, but we don't know the precise details of this!
 

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I don’t think the Ioniq will drop in price as a consequence of the Ioniq 5. They’re in very different sections of the market. If anything I would expect values to firm up when it’s discontinued as there isn’t currently anything else that compares in terms of efficiency and value. Just my thoughts.
 

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Good point. It's a great car tbh. I bought an ID.3 thinking I'd swap over, but didn't like the minimalism of the ID.3. Also in my tests at genuine 70 on motorway I found the Ioniq to be 10% more efficient than ID.3. Smaller cross section & lower drag coefficient as well, lighter car in total, thinner & lighter tyres. So it's going to give the ID.3 45 kWh a run for it's money I'm quite sure! In the end I was happy to sell the ID.3 & stick with Ioniq. Haven't seen any announcements for a replacement for it, though there are larger SUVs/Saloons etc based on the Ioniq 5 new chassis & tech. I can't imagine they'll abandon this market slot, I'd take an upgrade to 45 or 50 kWh like a shot! In the same small & efficient compact package, not the bloated Ioniq 5+ sizes!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Thanks all for taking the time to reply - it is a 69 plate from Feb 2020 so highly probable it may require the battery replacement which I would not be too bothered about I now have to convince my wife that it is a necessary upgrade to the Leaf it would be nice to forget having to worry about battery health etc. and have always been amazed how efficient they Ioniq is.
 

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2020 Ioniq 38 2016 Leaf 30 gone
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My Ioniq is a 69 plate registered Jan 2020, it falls within the battery recall VIN numbers but as mentioned above there is a very remote chance the battery will catch fire, well hopefully anyway. I've limited my charging to 90% as recommended so am not worried. If a new battery is required I view that as a win situation (y)

Grab a test drive if you can I'm sure you will like it, I'm really impressed with the efficiency although I do drive mostly in eco mode.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Checked the last 6 digits of the VIN and it does fall in the range outlined above so would be in line for a new battery when ever that would happen.
 

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I've just rec'd my recall letter this morning. Just says stick to 90% SOC for AC & Rapid charging, sign up to say you're doing this, receive charging credit on "Charge MyHyundai" app, and wait for a letter someday to say what happens next. I'm happy with that. Just means 20 miles less on the GOM on the long trips I do, so I'll stop off at an Ionity 8-Rapid hub at Banbury en-route for 15 mins & use up that credit.
 

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According to EVdatabase website the difference in range is 40 miles between 28 and 38 version. You can get Ioniq 28 SE from around £15.5k for higher mileage and around £17.5k for a lower mileage. Is 40 miles more range worth £3.5 to £5.5k?
If your answer is yes than go for Ioniq 38.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Good point - but my main plan is to hang on to my next purchase for a long time so I'm thinking the 38 would keep up with newer cars in regards to range but like you say 40 miles is not a lot in the scheme of things and even the 28 will give me far more than my current Leaf 30
 

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2020 Ioniq 38 2016 Leaf 30 gone
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Good point - but my main plan is to hang on to my next purchase for a long time so I'm thinking the 38 would keep up with newer cars in regards to range but like you say 40 miles is not a lot in the scheme of things and even the 28 will give me far more than my current Leaf 30
I also plan on keeping my Ioniq for a good few years. I drive like a granny in eco but would estimate in summer my Ioniq is capable of almost double the range of my Leaf 30. I'm currently getting 5.8 miles per kW, the best I ever achieved in the Leaf was 4.7.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
One thing about the recall is that the DVLA website which the seller has gone to on gov.uk clearly says there are no outstanding safety recalls would the battery replacement not be listed and only be handled by Hyundai ?
 

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It not just the miles though. There would be a price difference between new and old. There are bigger infotainment screens and apps for remote charging and climate control in the 2020, also 4yrs left on the warranty.
I have a 172 mile journey which according to my gom, 38kwh, the other would have been achievable without a stop. 188 @ 100%. Did M25 and M40 with ACC set to 72mph. Got to Oxford services from gom on exactly 50%. The buffer from him to distance left had dropped to 5 miles. So second part of the journey would of had to be slower without a stop. Average for both ways was 4.6m/kWh.
Because it is a 3hr journey I will make a stop for Per at sometime. I don't have a charger at home do most of my charging at Tesco a couple of hours at a time whilst I walk my dogs and pop in to the shop. I am not even bothering to charge to 100% before I leave anymore because I know I will stop on the way.
Quicker charging For 38kwh is achievable in the 10-75% range last time I did it it took 45 mins and that was in colder times 5-7°, charge rate drops after 75%.
If you are comparing charging speed you have to take the time it takes to charge on the 28kwh to 80% against the time it takes to charge the 38kwh to 55%. On a 50kw charger these times it will be roughly the same, 38kwh can't utilise the extra power of the 100kwh chargers so this is the time the 28kwh chargers faster.
38kwh is liquid cooled and this can result in slower charging in the winter time until the battery is warmed, but I have never really spent more the 45 mind on a charger.
 

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Good point - but my main plan is to hang on to my next purchase for a long time so I'm thinking the 38 would keep up with newer cars in regards to range but like you say 40 miles is not a lot in the scheme of things and even the 28 will give me far more than my current Leaf 30
If you can afford £21k for 38 and you can accept slower rapid charging speeds go for it.
Overall, it probably is a better car.
I am happy owner of 28 and personally couldn't live with the fact that I have newer more expensive car with a slower rapid charging speeds.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks all - been test driving a 28 and a 38 this afternoon and such great cars to drive, really drawn to the 38, can’t believe it was showing 52% and still had 115 miles on the range and I drove it hard.
 

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2020 Ioniq 38 2016 Leaf 30 gone
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Thanks all - been test driving a 28 and a 38 this afternoon and such great cars to drive, really drawn to the 38, can’t believe it was showing 52% and still had 115 miles on the range and I drove it hard.
I’m currently on 53% and 103 miles DTE, I’ve started using normal rather than eco mode today, doesn't really feel any different to eco mode to me?
 

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Thanks all - been test driving a 28 and a 38 this afternoon and such great cars to drive, really drawn to the 38, can’t believe it was showing 52% and still had 115 miles on the range and I drove it hard.
Hmm, not sure quite how you managed to achieve that! Can't have been going hard enough!!

Yesterday I & the Mrs went for a day by the beach at zero notice. Car was already sitting 80% full, so we made sandwiches & shot off like a rocket. M3 from Winchester, A31 to Ringwood, A3049 past Pool, past Wareham, to Arne Bird Reserve. Driving as fast as possible & legal, trip there & back worked out at 4.5 miles/kWh. I did see > 80 on the speedo at one moment downhill, then backed off to my usual 76. Mio Satnav in new holder worked well, shows me true speed, 74 on speedo = true 70 at the mo. (I have to admit, the car's Satnav is pants imho, hence added Mio to do the job properly, but that's another thread!)

So that would work out to about 38 kWh @ 4.5 m/kWh = 171 miles, 52% of this is then 89 miles.
This is one car where the WLTP is reckoned to be achievable in the real world! So if I'd gone more gently I'm pretty sure I'd have achieved WLTP rates at decent speed.

My first-ever long trip in the 38, last winter, 10 degrees C & heating on, wet roads, was a 160 mile trip to Derby. Not being sure of the range, I went super-carefully, using radar-ACC to follow HGVs closely-but-safely a lot of the way. So 57 mph steady speed stuff. The last few miles I had plenty of reserve range, this had been growing slowly but steadily on the A34 & M40 behind-HGV sections, so the last 40 miles I went a bit quicker up the M69 & M1 at more like 65 mph. We arrived with 40 miles left on the GOM, having done 160. So this tells me that I can manage a 200 mile trip in depths of winter in cold & wet weather if I absolutely have to, by driving very gently. This is one impressively efficient EV!
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
What was noticeable on the drive home after testing driving both the 28 and 38 was along the same route how much more power my Leaf 30 used compared to both Ioniqs which I expected but really noticeable going up a long steep hill on a dual carriageway.
 
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