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On a 2013 leaf before you forgo the flex I'd want to check the SOH and battery health. No point buying a battery that's just about to pass the warranty replacement point...
Hi
I have a Nissan Leaf on a Flex contract unfortunately. Is it possible to buy the battery after the contract ends?
Thanks in advance.
 

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Thank you, Miles Roberts, for starting this very helpful thread.

I have just bought out my battery lease. After 3 years cost was £3,384.12 (incl VAT). That corresponds closely with the original cost of the battery reduced by 10% a year.
can anyone advice me on who to contact to buy battery lease from RCI?
 

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you may be better off buying a second hand battery off say ebay, swapping it and then asking RCI to collect theirs ;-)

Sent from my SM-N950F using Tapatalk
 

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you may be better off buying a second hand battery off say ebay, swapping it and then asking RCI to collect theirs ;-)

Sent from my SM-N950F using Tapatalk
Well if RCI treat nissan like they do renault, it will cost an arm and a leg to do so. Best bet is to go to a main dealer and enquire. It is possible so I am told.
 

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Hi
I have a Nissan Leaf on a Flex contract unfortunately. Is it possible to buy the battery after the contract ends?
Thanks in advance.
Yes. The amount varies depending on the contract. Contact RCI for a quote.
 

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When I purchased my battery from RCI it could only be purchased via a Nissan dealer. The Nissan dealer had all the details of the cost of buying the battery to hand and it worked very smoothly - except that at first RCI did not seem to know the battery had been purchased and tried to chase up the lease payments! However, it was soon sorted.
 

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I am just about to pick up a Leaf from local Nissan dealer. They do not sell any used leafs with rented batteries.
It seems like the battery rental on a leaf is like PPI. The batteries are pretty durable by the looks of it. I am currently spending £70 per month on petrol. Paying £70 on battery rental stopped me even considering an leaf or zoe before.
 

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I am just about to pick up a Leaf from local Nissan dealer. They do not sell any used leafs with rented batteries.
It seems like the battery rental on a leaf is like PPI. The batteries are pretty durable by the looks of it. I am currently spending £70 per month on petrol. Paying £70 on battery rental stopped me even considering an leaf or zoe before.
My Leaf is over four and a half years old (registered April 2014).

Battery still shows all twelve bars. Just passed 40,000 miles today.

From personal experience I'd say the battery was pretty durable.

Never had an issue with the car. Great car, that has been a pleasure to drive and has saved me a fortune over using an ICE on a daily basis.

Of course, I remember the old days when Ecotricity Rapid chargers were free. Saved a serious amount of money those first few years.

Bought my car, ex-demo Tekna, from the dealer with only a few thousand miles on the clock for less than £14,000, which was a massive saving off the £32,500 + showroom price, well £28,500 + otr price after the £5000 Government Electric Car Grant had been deducted.

Most at the time went for two or three year PCP deals, with low deposits, and considered anyone actually buying the car outright to be mad.

I am more convinced than ever now that outright purchase was the best way to go.
I own my car, with no monthly payments, and had I gone down the PCP route would almost certainly by now have paid a fair bit more than £14,000 and be in a position where I'd have to hand it back, stump up a hefty deposit and make monthly payments again for years on end.
 

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42k miles on public charging. Am I an expert yet?
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My Leaf is over four and a half years old (registered April 2014).

Battery still shows all twelve bars. Just passed 40,000 miles today.

From personal experience I'd say the battery was pretty durable.

Never had an issue with the car. Great car, that has been a pleasure to drive and has saved me a fortune over using an ICE on a daily basis.

Of course, I remember the old days when Ecotricity Rapid chargers were free. Saved a serious amount of money those first few years.

Bought my car, ex-demo Tekna, from the dealer with only a few thousand miles on the clock for less than £14,000, which was a massive saving off the £32,500 + showroom price, well £28,500 + otr price after the £5000 Government Electric Car Grant had been deducted.

Most at the time went for two or three year PCP deals, with low deposits, and considered anyone actually buying the car outright to be mad.

I am more convinced than ever now that outright purchase was the best way to go.
I own my car, with no monthly payments, and had I gone down the PCP route would almost certainly by now have paid a fair bit more than £14,000 and be in a position where I'd have to hand it back, stump up a hefty deposit and make monthly payments again for years on end.
I bought my 30kWh brand new on PCP just over two and a half years ago fully expecting to hand it back at the end, with one of the following as a result:
  • Interesting experiment, but it just doesn't work
  • Interesting experiment, but not great for my use case right now
  • OK, but not brilliant given what I can get now
  • Brilliant, but it's a shame the value isn't worth the final payment
A fifth option has become apparent in the last year or so though: Brilliant car, and totally worth keeping. Not at all worth handing back for anything that's on the market now or likely to be in the future.

Even with it's high mileage, my car is worth approximately the final payment at the moment so I'm planning on keeping it; which'll mean paying a lot for it (final invoice price was ~£19,500 after all the discounts, but at the moment the cost/benefit on literally any other electrified option is just not worth it, and I'm not willing to consider going back to full ICE unless I have no choice whatsoever.

Prices for new EVs are stupid high at the moment, because the demand is so much that even at the inflated sticker prices people are willing to pay and wait a crazy amount of time. They can't make them fast enough, and none of the cars on the market at the moment are worth replacing a 30kWh Leaf for in my opinion. I can't see anything on the horizon that's likely to be worth it either.

If an Ioniq was available at a sensible price, I'd probably take one in a heartbeat because it's basically the 30kWh Leaf but with a fully temperature managed battery...but there aren't any available at sensible prices that I can find :(
 

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Try a new Ioniq, may be a reasonable price as so much competition from the big battery Kona.
I found one deal that was almost close to what I'd be willing to pay - but everything is 24 months which is frankly too short, and I can't find anything that doesn't compel you to give it back. I want the option of keeping it for as long as I like in case it turns out like the Leaf - I'm not willing to put myself in the position that a lot of people find themselves in now where they have to give back cars that they got on stupidly cheap deals and have no option but to get something they don't want to replace it.

The deal I'm currently on is very good, but not stupidly cheap like a lot of Leafs were sold on. £19k for a car with a £31k list price is not far off a fairly typical sort of discount for a car at the end of it's model year life where the manufacturer really just wants to keep the factory open. The Leafs sold on the ridiculous £200pm for 2 years deals were pure desperation on Nissans part really...

Ironically, the popularity of electric cars going through the literal and proverbial roof has completely changed the market - people are so keen to get electric cars that my car is worth about 80% more than I expected it to be at this point, making it worth keeping but also sadly meaning that nothing is available at an appropriate cost/benefit ratio to change into.
 

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Do you think the trader does not know the battery is leased or could he be right?
Proceed very carefully. First thing would be to ask RCI if the car is battery owned or Flex.
 

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Isn’t the Nissan dealership who paid off the lease supposed to engage with the DVLA to re-issue a V5C with the flex part deleted? Hence, if “flex” still appears on the V5C, it’s still flex / battery leased...?
 

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Hence, if “flex” still appears on the V5C, it’s still flex / battery leased...?
Probalby. There are occasional errors. Any potential buyer should check with RCI before proceeding.
 

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We have just had a notification through from Nissan to say that customers are now able to buy themselves out of the battery rental on a Flex agreement, and terminate the lease agreement.

If a customer decides they wish to purchase the battery they will need to visit a Nissan dealership, and provide the VIN number.
The dealership will then fill out an online enquiry form to check ownership/eligibility.
The cost of the battery is based on a sliding scale based on the battery age.
Once completed, the form will confirm the cost of the battery.
If the customer wishes to progress with the purchase, the cost of the battery purchase is to be paid directly to the dealership.
The original V5 needs to be posted back to Nissan HQ by the dealer.
Nissan will then arrange for the V5 to be amended by DVLA, in a process which is likely to take around 4 weeks.
Hi Miles
Thanks for the info
I have a leaf that is a release so it is now coming up to the end of the second 3 year period
i am planning on paying the final payment on the PCP and buying out the battery
My issue is that the battery is now 6 years old and I would estimate that the lease payments over the 6 years are almost 150% of the the full purchase price new.
In this situation I think Nissan are taking the mickey charging any more than an admin fee for the battery.The second point is at 15k pa the lease cost is £140 mth
The car will not have done 45k over the 36 months.What this amounts to is 3 areas of contention
1/ A pcp deal with a final payment to buy the car clearly shown that is completely useless and contradictory as Nissan will not allow you to buy the car at this figure and give no indication as to what the battery will cost at end of term.
2/As mentioned I pay a premium on the battery lease due to the contract mileage.this is then ignored when the battery is valued and due to the milage being lower than contracted the battery costs more.so in effect paying twice for the milage
3/Nissan want to charge approx £2000 for a battery after paying 150% of the cost already.
I would be grateful for your opinion as from where I stand this is unacceptable in terms of treating customers fairly as the alternative is to gift a car back at end of contract that is worth a lot more than the GFV or be stuck with a car that is unsellable
 

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Whats your actual mileage compared to what you opted for?
IE are you doing less than the PCP deal? if so maybe they would offer something for this?
How much is the actual buyout for you (age and mileage of vehicle needed to show if its decent Value)
Is it worth asking Indra to install a battery from a 30kwh or 40kwh unit instead?
 
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