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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking at buying a second hand electric Kona- probably a 64kWh, 2018-2020 Premium SE version.
I haven't bought a car in a couple of years, never mind an EV- is there anything specific I should look out for?
Based on the year model I'm looking at I think it would still be under warranty- is it still valid for the second owner?
Is there any way of telling how the battery was looked after, i.e. was it kept at nearly 100% all the time (From what I understand this isn't the best thing to do)
Chargers/Cables accesories that should be included, or that I'll need if they aren't?
Thanks in advance.
 

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Kona64
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Car was supplied new with 2 cables ….. type2 in a round bag and Granny Brick for 13amp 3pin in an oblong bag.

The GOM mostly indicates how it has been driven but you can do basic maths
50% start of charge and range left below 130 would raise an eyebrow ——in my view
Use this ratio on a different SOC % .
 
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'19 i3 120Ah / '20 Kona 64kWh / '21 e208 / '22 ID.3 Family
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50% start of charge and range left below 130 would raise an eyebrow ——in my view
Why’s that? 260 miles from 100% is perfectly normal, isn’t it?

With cars in general, the ones that have had the easiest lives and which are likely to have less wear to suspension components, interior trim (seat bolsters etc), and drivetrain components are the ones that are mostly driven on motorways (and perhaps over long distances on good A roads) - and in an EV this will obviously mean a GOM more likely to show a lower potential range due to the higher speeds that entails.

So with an EV, I would have thought a GOM that shows very high range is more likely to be a cause for some thought as it may indicate the car has been used much more for driving around town or on slower country roads, with all the potholes and other potential for wear and damage that entails, plus more wear associated with people getting in and out more often, and potentially more wear to drivetrain components through acceleration and regen etc.

The one potential aspect involved with an EV specifically that has done lots of long trips is the likelihood of a higher proportion of rapid charging (which some may consider a cause for concern), but unless you know who the previous owner was, there’s also a potential for a car used mainly off the motorway network to have been regularly rapid charged (eg if that owner did not have off street parking etc).

Not sure, but perhaps there is an ODB app for the Kona that can reveal the proportion of rapid charging.
 

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I'm looking at buying a second hand electric Kona- probably a 64kWh, 2018-2020 Premium SE version.
I haven't bought a car in a couple of years, never mind an EV- is there anything specific I should look out for?
Based on the year model I'm looking at I think it would still be under warranty- is it still valid for the second owner?
Is there any way of telling how the battery was looked after, i.e. was it kept at nearly 100% all the time (From what I understand this isn't the best thing to do)
Chargers/Cables accesories that should be included, or that I'll need if they aren't?
Thanks in advance.
Don’t worry about the battery, they’re mainly getting new ones as part of the recall. You should ask If the car you’re looking to buy is affected. Other than that there are very few of these cars, most of the big software faults have been addressed by now and they’re Hyundai’s so they’re built well and you’ll still have 2-3 years warranty left depending on what age of car you buy. If it’s still on the original Korean Nexen tyres budget £500-£600 for a decent set of tyres. it really transforms the car.
 

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I would say most EVs spend most of their lives in urban areas with only the odd long trip on motorways. As for the battery note the miles of range and percentage of battery and work on 2.5 to 3 miles per percent and do they seem about right, and then do a test drive and see if they still seem about right. The 5 year warranty is transferred to the new owner.
 

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I would say most EVs spend most of their lives in urban areas with only the odd long trip on motorways.
Yeah, I would say most EVs do too, as most EVs still have short ranges and slow charging. I would also say that EVs with longer ranges and/or faster charger (like the Kona) are probably more likely to spend more time on motorways than the majority of EVs, however.

If OP can somehow manage to find a Kona that’s done a lot of miles on motorways (and maybe also not been mostly only rapid charged), then I’d say it could be a better buy than one that’s done a similar amount of (or even perhaps less) miles in urban areas or on poorly maintained country roads.

(In any event, the GOM is a fairly useless indicator of the health or condition of the car. My car has just charged back up to 100% and the GOM currently says 207 miles….not because the car is knackered, but because the last journey was a 450 mile trip from Scotland to London in heavy rain and with strong headwinds.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you all for the replies.
Is there a screen that show total charging time of the car somewhere as then you could calculate and average of fast v slow chargers used. I'll assume it is not a metric that is available via obd unless somebody can tell me otherwise.
Is there any way to check which cars will have a battery replacement- I saw something about VIN numbers, but didn't sound definite last I read.
 

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Thank you all for the replies.
Is there a screen that show total charging time of the car somewhere as then you could calculate and average of fast v slow chargers used. I'll assume it is not a metric that is available via obd unless somebody can tell me otherwise.
Is there any way to check which cars will have a battery replacement- I saw something about VIN numbers, but didn't sound definite last I read.
In theory, ALL cars built before March 2020 are implicated in the battery recall.

There is no screen that shows the charging times and I personally wouldn’t get too hung up on it - the warranty on the battery is for 8 years , so it’s unlikely you’ll be left holding any babies if you buy a Kona.
 
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