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Discussion Starter #1
So I've had my M3 AWD Long Range for a week and I'm loving the car but I'm still confused over the charging.

I'm charging to 80% except for one day when I did a long trip (200+ miles) and therefore charged it to 100%.

People say to charge it every night but today I only drove 24 miles so it's still at 72%.

Should I still be charging it from 72% to 80%?

With my old Leaf, I ran it down to 30% before charging it all the way back to 100% to balance the cells and after 22,000 miles and 2 years it still had full range and battery capacity with no loss of bars.

I know Tesla is different but it seems too soon to charge after only 8% has been used.
 

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Charge every night if you like. Or don’t.

It will make very little difference.
 

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I think either way is fine. As far as I know Teslas don't need to charge to 100% to balance the cells. If you don't often have unplanned longish journeys, you can let it drop to 50% or even lower before charging. Whatever is more convenient to you. Do you have home charging?

Even before a long journey I personally don't charge to 100%, I set it to 95%. Makes me feel a bit less anxious.
 

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Yes. I have home charging so it's no bother to charge every day. I just don't want to damage the car by charging when it has hardly been driven on any particular day.

I have visions of my Mum's old Nokia phone which eventually died an unseemly death due to being repeatedly charged when it had hardly been used!
 

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  1. I had a nightmarish experience with Tesla model 3. Was notified thru Tesla app that I needed to get computer hardware change on the car less than 2 yrs old ,for full autopilot function(paid when bought).Nearest Tesla center was at corpus christie Texas ,2 hrs drive, and on 15th October this was done. However on 18th October ,after charging car to 270 milesat home ,Tesla app on iPhone would not connect nor the key card , which was functioning before this upgrade. icons on app were greyed out with a circle at bottom saying 'connecting' Emergency Tesla service pinged the car but could not correct it- mentioned low front battery. I was essentially locked out with my wallet and house keys in the car. Luckily I was at home. emergency help would not arrive and asked me to call next day. Next day I got text from Tesla mobile service at corpus enquiring what the issue was.I texted the whole issue again.Their text response was 'fix an appointment with Tesla app' this was dumb because the app was not 'connecting'.Then, they texted bring car on 27th October.I texted- it does not connect or open the door how will I drive. I got frustrated and called emergency Tesla service- wanting urgent help ,stating my wallet and driver license was inside car and car was useless and I myself do emergency service.After much bickering and veiled threats of contacting higher authorities , they sent someone, who I requested bring a front battery since last night there was remote assessment of such. After installing a new battery, car reconnected and is working.How come this was not picked up 3 days before at service center,Did changing hardware run out the battery. how come no warning showed on the Tesla dash board.
    However ,after battery install the tech screwed homelink garage door which stopped working after 30 min of tech trying to program it. garage would open only1 foot. He insisted that garage door was faulty. His cockiness with inexperience was striking. I went on lift master website ,then and there and fixed the garage door by reprogramming it. Apparently if you press remote too long ,it wipes the data. . He had wiped the data by pressing the remote in prolonged fashion which can wipe data. Also the trainer button on garage hardware needs to be pressed long enough to make it blink before programming home link etc.

  2. Another worrying thing is I have a long range 310 miles model3 less than 2 yrs old and max charge has slid to 280 from 310

    Bottom line-testa has mushroomed many service centers in the country with inexperienced techs. This does not match up with Elon's enthusiasm. Time has come for Elon to sample bmw or Mercedes service center alacrity and be open minded and fix these frustrating issues or promise less than he can deliver. Given this scenario, if the elite car makers develop a comparable car, then loss will be Elon's
    They should have a centralized few hubs of experienced techs that can guide these half baked techs, via zoom or webex. Corpus christie apparently has only 2 employees and blind maybe leading the blind.This nightmare scenario of being locked out with no emergency help from Tesla in the night with nearest Tesla service center 2 hr drive makes me pause weather I should ever buy a Tesla again in a small town
 

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You actually don’t want to charge every day, letting the battery sit at lower states of charge helps the BMS keep calibrated. I would just keep it between 30% and 80% when you’ve no need to gi outside those limits which is good fir the battery health, and leave it over night at a variety of levels fir the BMS. The Always Be Charging mantra is looking a little old adjoined now.

More on the BMS calibration if you want a bit of the logic see here
 

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We previously had a Leaf 24.

We bought the leaf at 2.5 years old, 13300miles and 88.4 SoH. I drove it 12200 miles over 19 months and took great care with the battery to treat it well (keeping it mostly between 40 and 80%). When we sold the Leaf it was at 87.99 SoH (and in between times a long journey with plenty of rapids boosted it to 92%. However, the 87.99 was without any rapid "boosting"and was the lowest ever seen). In other words, by taking extremely good care of it it only suffered 0.4% SoH loss (unlike the first owner who must have been pretty bad to it)

When we got the 3SR+ one of the things that I was keen about getting a new EV, rather than used, was the chance to care properly for the battery from new. We have had the 3 for more than 13 months and done over 8000 miles and it is less than 3% degradation according to Teslacore. Degradation is always steepest in the first year or two then settles out, so our Leaf was on a flatter part of the curve.

So, with all of that I'm quite confident that my charging regimen is one that is healthy for the cars, with evidence from both 3SR+ and leaf that I've had less degradation than many people in similar circumstances.

So, what is that regime?

My workplace is 12.5 miles or so from home, so 25 mile round trip. With the Leaf I would typically use approx 45% SoC for the round trip. With the SR+ I use about 10-15% (depending on weather and itchiness of right foot). We have an AC 22kW charger at my workplace that is 50p for 2 hours. 2 hours 3.3kW charge on the leaf was almost exactly +40% SoC, and 2 hours 11kW charge on the SR+ is almost exactly +40% SoC (and 22kWh for 50p isn't to be sniffed at!).

With the Leaf I would get intro the groove of arriving at work with between 20 and 40% SoC and charge up for 2 hours each day. As it used a bit more than it would gain each day, toward the end of the week I'd do a 4 hour charge at work and charge the car up to 90 or so (so would be less than 80 by the time I got home for the weekend).

With the 3SR+, I charge it once or twice a week if commuting full time, typically charging when I get below 40%. During lockdown I had the 3 set to 50% SoC charge limit.

All of which is a long and roundabout way of saying... No, you don't need to keep plugging it in. Letting it balance at different SoC levels maintains the BMS calibration accurately (most cases of "lost range" or "degradation" on model 3 are really just confused BMS because they don't get to sit unplugged at different SoC levels).

Drive around for a few days, charge up to 80 when you get down below 40. Charge to 100 immediately before a long trip.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
We previously had a Leaf 24.

We bought the leaf at 2.5 years old, 13300miles and 88.4 SoH. I drove it 12200 miles over 19 months and took great care with the battery to treat it well (keeping it mostly between 40 and 80%). When we sold the Leaf it was at 87.99 SoH (and in between times a long journey with plenty of rapids boosted it to 92%. However, the 87.99 was without any rapid "boosting"and was the lowest ever seen). In other words, by taking extremely good care of it it only suffered 0.4% SoH loss (unlike the first owner who must have been pretty bad to it)

When we got the 3SR+ one of the things that I was keen about getting a new EV, rather than used, was the chance to care properly for the battery from new. We have had the 3 for more than 13 months and done over 8000 miles and it is less than 3% degradation according to Teslacore. Degradation is always steepest in the first year or two then settles out, so our Leaf was on a flatter part of the curve.

So, with all of that I'm quite confident that my charging regimen is one that is healthy for the cars, with evidence from both 3SR+ and leaf that I've had less degradation than many people in similar circumstances.

So, what is that regime?

My workplace is 12.5 miles or so from home, so 25 mile round trip. With the Leaf I would typically use approx 45% SoC for the round trip. With the SR+ I use about 10-15% (depending on weather and itchiness of right foot). We have an AC 22kW charger at my workplace that is 50p for 2 hours. 2 hours 3.3kW charge on the leaf was almost exactly +40% SoC, and 2 hours 11kW charge on the SR+ is almost exactly +40% SoC (and 22kWh for 50p isn't to be sniffed at!).

With the Leaf I would get intro the groove of arriving at work with between 20 and 40% SoC and charge up for 2 hours each day. As it used a bit more than it would gain each day, toward the end of the week I'd do a 4 hour charge at work and charge the car up to 90 or so (so would be less than 80 by the time I got home for the weekend).

With the 3SR+, I charge it once or twice a week if commuting full time, typically charging when I get below 40%. During lockdown I had the 3 set to 50% SoC charge limit.

All of which is a long and roundabout way of saying... No, you don't need to keep plugging it in. Letting it balance at different SoC levels maintains the BMS calibration accurately (most cases of "lost range" or "degradation" on model 3 are really just confused BMS because they don't get to sit unplugged at different SoC levels).

Drive around for a few days, charge up to 80 when you get down below 40. Charge to 100 immediately before a long trip.
Thank you. I usually leave Sentry off when car is parked at home on our driveway so the car can have a proper "sleep" with nothing using power. So I think I'll do what you suggest and leave the car at home during the day or night unplugged at a variety of charge levels until it gets to between 30 and 40% then charge it to 80% - unless I need a 100% charge for a long journey.

Even though I have a home charge point, and it's no trouble to connect the every night, I can't believe that it's healthy for the battery to be charged only a few % if on a particular day I've hardly driven it.
 

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There are so many different 'best practices' floating around the internet that it's difficult to choose who to believe. These are some of the things that I've heard, some are a given but others I'm a bit iffy about. In any case, I try to follow them to the best of my ability.

1) Seldom charge to 100% as this accelerates battery degradation. Even on long journeys, it's best not to go all the way as regenerative breaking won't work as efficiently. After all, if the battery is at 100% then there's no need to regenerate energy back into the battery. You'll be using your brakes more, which is a waste of energy. So like someone said above, I tend to charge it to 95% for really long journeys.

2) This is partly contradicting the first point but apparently you should charge it to 100% at least once a year to balance the cells but don't keep it at 100% for long. Not sure how true this is as someone above has said this isn't necessary. See what I mean when I said that there are so many contradicting opinions on battery care. Who do you choose to believe?

3) A happy tesla is a plugged in tesla, so always keep it plugged in when not in use.

4) If you're not going to drive the car for a long time then it's best to keep the SoC at around the 50% mark. I believe this is true as lithium batteries don't like being at a high state of charge, regardless of whether it's a car battery, mobile battery or laptop battery etc.

5) Likewise, don't go below 20% SoC.

6) Another one I read up on a Tesla forum while I was doing some research before buying my car: it's better to do regular short charges rather than one long charge. So for example, if your battery is at 80% and you use 10% every day, replenish that 10% when you get home every day. Apparently this is better than driving for 5 days without charging, which will use up 50%, and then do a long charge. Anyone heard of this or can confirm this is true?

7) Supercharging will cause faster battery degradation over time than if you were to charge at home. However, I believe the incremental degradation shouldn't be too high as there is plenty of anecdotal evidence of people who only supercharge and their battery is still pretty healthy.

Ultimately, there are so many contradicting opinions that I don't think you should worry too much. So long as you follow the basic principles like not overcharging it or over discharging it then it should be fine. Tesla wants you to enjoy the car, not worry over the battery care too much :)
 

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No reason why you need to charge, and its generally better for the battery to be sat at a lower percentage then a higher (there is a graph that does the roads and sitting at 90% vs 50% apparently puts more stress on the battery). However in the manual it is clearly written that you should be plugged in, regardless of charging.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
No reason why you need to charge, and its generally better for the battery to be sat at a lower percentage then a higher (there is a graph that does the roads and sitting at 90% vs 50% apparently puts more stress on the battery). However in the manual it is clearly written that you should be plugged in, regardless of charging.
When you say "plugged in" do you mean plugged in but NOT charging or plugged in AND CHARGING.

I think that's where the manual falls down. It implies plugged in means CHARGING but you could plug it in and no charge, too.

For now, I think I'm going to not charge to 100% unless I have a very long journey and need to, and I will only charge to 80% normally when I do charge, and I will run the level down to below 70% before recharging (as I think it's not worth it for less than 10%) and not let it go below 30% if I can help it! Wow, that's a lot to contend with compared to my old Leaf which I just plugged in and charged to 100% as often as I liked!
 

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I just keep mine plugged in at home when I am not using it.
My normal charge / usage is between 20-80% with the odd charge to 100% when doing longer trips.
 

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When you say "plugged in" do you mean plugged in but NOT charging or plugged in AND CHARGING.

I think that's where the manual falls down. It implies plugged in means CHARGING but you could plug it in and no charge, too.

For now, I think I'm going to not charge to 100% unless I have a very long journey and need to, and I will only charge to 80% normally when I do charge, and I will run the level down to below 70% before recharging (as I think it's not worth it for less than 10%) and not let it go below 30% if I can help it! Wow, that's a lot to contend with compared to my old Leaf which I just plugged in and charged to 100% as often as I liked!
Tesla has said to always keep the car plugged in when not in use. This includes when the car is NOT charging. Keeping it plugged in for long periods will not harm the battery. In fact, Tesla even recommends that you should plug your car in if you go on holiday for a long time. From what I understand, this prevents battery drain and even tops up the 12v battery if it falls too low.

My car has been sat on my drive and plugged in for the last 3 days at 72% and I don't need to drive my car until Friday.
 

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The two main benefits of always plugging in are (a) it becomes routine and you don't forget the day before a long drive (b) Cabin and battery pre-heating - although the latter only really applies in very cold weather.

We have ours scheduled using ev.energy to use cheapest cost, so need to make sure plugged in to take benefit. Nothing worse than forgetting and having to go out in cold late at night.

Keeping plugged in also helps if you want to use Sentry at home as it does use quite a bit of power. We switch off as have home CCTV.

There are a lot of armchair experts on charging Tesla, but there is no field data to say charging to 80% every night on 7kW is bad for the car. Personally I believe fast acceleration (high power draw) on a cold battery is probably far worse for it, yet nobody seems to care about that! Anyway, everyone can make their own decisions and do what is best for them.

Edit - There are reports that occasionally letting it going to below 10% can help range forecast.
 

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When you say "plugged in" do you mean plugged in but NOT charging or plugged in AND CHARGING.

I think that's where the manual falls down. It implies plugged in means CHARGING but you could plug it in and no charge, too.

For now, I think I'm going to not charge to 100% unless I have a very long journey and need to, and I will only charge to 80% normally when I do charge, and I will run the level down to below 70% before recharging (as I think it's not worth it for less than 10%) and not let it go below 30% if I can help it! Wow, that's a lot to contend with compared to my old Leaf which I just plugged in and charged to 100% as often as I liked!
Plugged in means plugged in, you set the charge limit, you can obviously be plugged in but not charging. The idea is that it is inactive for a while and the percentage drops below your charge rate it can top it up and condition the battery however it needs to. You shouldn't be going to 100% unless you really need to and ideally as soon as it is done you should drive off. Personally I just plug in when I'm home and I know that I'm unlikely to go out again the same day, it also adds another small level of security as any thief would also need to figure out how to remove the cable to.
 

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It would be useful to have the CCS plug unlock automatically from the car when finished charging.
We have long leads at the golf club and to be absent for 5 hours golfing prevents others from using the charger, each charger could easily reach 1 extra car either side of the mid point.
I can unlock the plug remotely via the app but after a short while it locks again.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
It would be useful to have the CCS plug unlock automatically from the car when finished charging.
We have long leads at the golf club and to be absent for 5 hours golfing prevents others from using the charger, each charger could easily reach 1 extra car either side of the mid point.
I can unlock the plug remotely via the app but after a short while it locks again.
I seem to recall that this feature is coming. The car will auto release the charger when charging is finished. But not sure what "finished" means? Does it mean 100% or the limit set by the user?

In the meanwhile, if you have the Tesla app notifications enabled, you will be notified when charging is finished (meaning reached your set level). You could then unlock the charger from the app to allow others to use the charger if you wanted.

Not sure if you are allowed phones on the Golf course!
 

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I seem to recall that this feature is coming. The car will auto release the charger when charging is finished. But not sure what "finished" means? Does it mean 100% or the limit set by the user?

In the meanwhile, if you have the Tesla app notifications enabled, you will be notified when charging is finished (meaning reached your set level). You could then unlock the charger from the app to allow others to use the charger if you wanted.

Not sure if you are allowed phones on the Golf course!
Yes I can release the CCS plug remotely but it re-locks again after a short period.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Yes I can release the CCS plug remotely but it re-locks again after a short period.
Really? I didn't know that. I wonder if they are going to be changing the logic with the software update to make the release permanent? I think the article I read mentioned it being designed to prevent people leaving their cars plugged in at motorway service stations, to allow other people to charge.
 
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