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MG ZS EV
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I see that Motability are working with Designability to improve public charging for the disabled. Given that EVs are so much easier to drive than ICE cars and ought to need little adaption for most drivers the fact that little thought has been given to public chargers, height of cables, curbs and bollards it’s not before time. Better late than never.
 

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I've thought for a long time that some of these are really bad. Efacec 50kW chargers for example have the control panel high up on the side of the unit. You generally have to squeeze between your car and the charger, up the kerb and around the side (generally in some mud) to activate it. If you have poor mobility or are moving over to the charger in a wheelchair you are going to really struggle.

For example:
142574
 

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VW Passat GTE
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little thought has been given to public chargers, height of cables, curbs and bollards
Also space to maneuver around the car to go between the charging station and car so you can plug in, fiddle with the charger, etc. Things like MyHailo and fuelService exist for an incredibly important reason that seems to have been forgotten in the EV charging infrastructure.
 

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PodPoint in the UK are as bad:



There's no way that a wheelchair user could access the panel although it's not strictly necessary as the App is an alternative. Saying that the cables are an issue - my Wife is currently on crutches after a disagreement with a tree and cannot handle a cable like those illustrated above - particularly with the kerbs, hoarding and posts in the example. Some form of automation or attended service at a Gridserve style hub would be her only alternative to home charging. She once went to a BP "service station" and shuffled into the shop and asked for help and was refused as the they claimed that the units were not theirs - sadly she just got upset and left rather than taking the legal action I suggested.
 

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Does anyone have direct experience of EVs and wheelchairs? My wife is newly disabled.
At the moment I have a BMW 330e (F30) and she can manage to get into the passenger seat, but her wheelchair takes one of the seats in the back and the chair won’t fit into the boot so takes up half of the back sea. I was planning to get a Tesla Model 3 or a Polestar 2 as I want a range of 200 miles+ (and I want a driver’s car) but the boot is rubbish on both.
Ideally we need an estate, so we can get an all-terrain wheelchair in the back. Not an SUV which is too high for her to transfer into.
Any thoughts? Plan B is a newer BMW330e estate but ideally I wanted a BEV. Please PM me if you have direct experience and are happy to talk by phone.
 

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I have a close friend who uses a wheelchair and who has been in my car with her son a few times now with no real problem. She has been a wheelchair user for many years though so is pretty good at getting in and out of cars. She has said she finds it easier to get in and out because of the higher seats and reckons that she has the most problems with cars that are too low to the ground as it makes her transfer far more difficult. Our car is an I-Pace so officially an SUV but not so high off the ground as the real SUVs. Her lightweight folding chair goes in the back no problem but it has always been myself of my wife who has done that for her. I have a liner in the back for the dogs anyway so that protects the car from any knocks from the chair. Although I didn't think about it at the time I bought the dog liner it is ideal for carrying a wheelchair as the flap that comes down to protect the lip of the boot works well to stop scratches when loading or unloading the chair.
 

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Does anyone have direct experience of EVs and wheelchairs? My wife is newly disabled.
At the moment I have a BMW 330e (F30) and she can manage to get into the passenger seat, but her wheelchair takes one of the seats in the back and the chair won’t fit into the boot so takes up half of the back sea. I was planning to get a Tesla Model 3 or a Polestar 2 as I want a range of 200 miles+ (and I want a driver’s car) but the boot is rubbish on both.
Ideally we need an estate, so we can get an all-terrain wheelchair in the back. Not an SUV which is too high for her to transfer into.
Any thoughts? Plan B is a newer BMW330e estate but ideally I wanted a BEV. Please PM me if you have direct experience and are happy to talk by phone.
No direct experience in an EV, but plenty in ICEs. MG5 seems worth a look - at least on paper, it looks closest to what I'd want if I was back in my wheelchair. Never seen one in the flesh though, so no idea if it is actually any good.
 

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MG ZS EV
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Does anyone have direct experience of EVs and wheelchairs? My wife is newly disabled.
At the moment I have a BMW 330e (F30) and she can manage to get into the passenger seat, but her wheelchair takes one of the seats in the back and the chair won’t fit into the boot so takes up half of the back sea. I was planning to get a Tesla Model 3 or a Polestar 2 as I want a range of 200 miles+ (and I want a driver’s car) but the boot is rubbish on both.
Ideally we need an estate, so we can get an all-terrain wheelchair in the back. Not an SUV which is too high for her to transfer into.
Any thoughts? Plan B is a newer BMW330e estate but ideally I wanted a BEV. Please PM me if you have direct experience and are happy to talk by phone.
Don’t rule out the MG5 until you have borrowed one for a test drive. It’s below your budget but you might be very pleasantly surprised. Look at the MG section. I have an MG ZS which is less of a drivers car because of softish suspension, but those with the technology reckon 0 to 60 in 7 second, better than advertised. You are looking for practicality and it is the only EV estate. It is to be updated soon and could have a much better range, ask the dealers what they know.
 

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Does anyone have direct experience of EVs and wheelchairs? My wife is newly disabled.
At the moment I have a BMW 330e (F30) and she can manage to get into the passenger seat, but her wheelchair takes one of the seats in the back and the chair won’t fit into the boot so takes up half of the back sea. I was planning to get a Tesla Model 3 or a Polestar 2 as I want a range of 200 miles+ (and I want a driver’s car) but the boot is rubbish on both.
Ideally we need an estate, so we can get an all-terrain wheelchair in the back. Not an SUV which is too high for her to transfer into.
Any thoughts? Plan B is a newer BMW330e estate but ideally I wanted a BEV. Please PM me if you have direct experience and are happy to talk by phone.
Hey, I remembered seeing this video a while back when I was getting interested in EVs. I hope its of interest. Apologies, no direct experience. Stay safe :)

The Best Car for Someone in a Wheelchair?! - Our new Tesla Model X!
 

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New partnership set to define disabled access standards for public EV chargers

Organisations which work with people with disabilities or long-term health issues are being asked to give their view in a series of workshops being hosted by Motability in August.

The national disability charity is working with government departments and the British Standards Institute (BSI) to develop consistent standards that identify how accessible public charge points are and to help design more accessible chargers for the future.
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All of this made me think of Petrol pumps that aren't very accessible, you often have to park quite close to them to get the hoses to reach. I don't think I've ever seen one with a wheel chair height display and card reader. Even the stowed hoses tend to be high. Imagine how difficult it would be for a disabled person had to assemble a wheel chair and transfer themselves into it, pay in the shop involving negotiating a kerb and push door, negotiate their way around all the rammed in convenience store to pay, get back out, into the car and stow their wheelchair.

The EV charging experience at home would be so much better with the stowed cable mounted at the correct height near the charging port of the car without the stress of inconsiderate impatient others. Having a decent charger and siting specification for new chargers can only be the right thing to do.
 

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All of this made me think of Petrol pumps that aren't very accessible, you often have to park quite close to them to get the hoses to reach. I don't think I've ever seen one with a wheel chair height display and card reader. Even the stowed hoses tend to be high. Imagine how difficult it would be for a disabled person had to assemble a wheel chair and transfer themselves into it, pay in the shop involving negotiating a kerb and push door, negotiate their way around all the rammed in convenience store to pay, get back out, into the car and stow their wheelchair.

The EV charging experience at home would be so much better with the stowed cable mounted at the correct height near the charging port of the car without the stress of inconsiderate impatient others. Having a decent charger and siting specification for new chargers can only be the right thing to do.

One advantage of filling stations is that they may have staff that can help. The nearest filling station to us does this, as I once saw a chap drive up and someone came out and both filled his car up and handed him the payment machine through the window. I got the impression he may have been a regular there, though.

As chargers are mostly in locations with no staff around this could well be a real problem. I guess home charging mitigates that a bit, but there still needs to be something done to allow the less able to use chargers. My wife's able bodied, but does struggle sometimes with charger cables, so I can see that they might be impossible for some to use. Nice to see that the newer Gridserve chargers do have a retractable wire support to tale some of the weight off the cable, but perhaps more thought needs to go into general access and usability.
 

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There are a few pay at the pump only ASDA petrol stations here that don't have any staff which would be impossible to use from a wheel chair. Most kiosk sites don't have free staff to come and help out. Why should a disabled person have to tell someone else their PIN number because they can't reach the number pad.
 

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Why should a disabled person have to tell someone else their PIN number because they can't reach the number pad.
Applepay or the Google equivalent, perhaps? Must be a way to make payment easier for someone from a car, using a phone, like an online purchase, too. The real issue seems to be access to the cable and manhandling the thing to plug in. This isn't that easy at some chargers for a slightly built able bodied person, must be very challenging for anyone with even a slight disability.

Pity that inductive charging looks to be such a long way off, and probably not that efficient. That, combined with payment via a phone could completely solve the problem, perhaps.

One problem we seem to have is that people just don't view the design of things from the perspective of anyone other than an able bodied adult. It seems that even those that should have a different mindset, like building inspectors, are more interested in ticking the boxes for Part M, rather than actually making spaces easier to use. We had a classic example when I designed and built our house. A good friend is paraplegic, and uses a wheelchair much of the time. Also my father was a wheelchair user for much of his life, and I spent my youth being his manhandler around places, lifting him in and out of the chair, etc.

I designed access all around our house with the less able bodied in mind, not just for the benefit of our friend when h visits (TBH he's very adept and getting pretty much anywhere and seems to have superhuman upper body strength), but with a thought as to what we might need as we get older. We have wide (~820mm clear opening) doors everywhere (saves rapped knuckles for wheelchair users), flush thresholds everywhere, gently ramped access to one entrance door, and chair turning spaces where needed. The building inspector picked up that the position of our downstairs toilet wasn't exactly compliant with the dimensions in Part M. I mentioned that I'd been given practical advice by a wheelchair user who had suggested the arrangement I'd put in as it made transfers easier. The building inspector was adamant that I needed a slightly larger space down one side of the toilet. I pointed out that this made life harder for anyone less able, as being able to brace against the adjacent wall at one side was very useful. In the end he had to agree that what we'd done was compliant with the intent of Part M, and that perhaps the rigid dimensions given in the AD might not actually be the best way to meet this intent. Felt like a small victory at the time, but I do wonder whether ticking boxes is more important than applying a bit of common sense.
 
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