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I don't know about a conspiracy I have no interest in that, I'm only interested in whether the plug on superchargers is a modified Type 2 or a bog standard one. There seems to be a disagreement on that. I took it for granted that you could not charge from it in the first instance, hence I have never tried myself. However it you cant use a Tesla home charger as proof because it means nothing.

I have no idea what Woke AF means ! I imaging it can't be nice :whistle:
Well, you can pop along to a Supercharger with a micrometer and check it against a standard Type 2. :)
 

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That sentence does not make sense How can anyone 'massively exceed the design specs' and it not be 'modified at all'.
The design specs are the specs that were given to the connector by its designer. In this case it was Mennekes and they rate the connector for maximum 70A per pin.

Tesla put up to 190A per pin through the connector when supercharging.

I would say that this qualifies as "massively exceeding the [design] specs". Perhaps I should just have said they "significantly overload" the connector.

Those specs are of course typically cautious, and based on a continuous (24h?) current of 70A, at an ambient air temperature of 55C, so there's a lot of headroom available when you're only running for 30 minutes at 20C ambient.

Tesla aren't manufacturing connectors with different physical specifications to the standard ones. They take normal connectors and then (mis)use them by exceeding the rating that was set by their designer. No different than putting 85A through a 32A commando connector, which is also pretty much harmless if you only do it for half an hour in free air at 20C.
 

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Co-author of CanZE. Q210 nov 2013
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I think they use two pins for + and two for - for DC charging, still overloading each pin with 25A.
 
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