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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I currently have a MINI Countryman PHEV, I plug this in for overnight charging after use.
As the MINI has a small battery it is useful to top it up after daily use.
I am now looking at an EV6 which has a much larger battery. It is better to charge the battery after a day‘s use say maybe 30 mile, or should I “save“up charging to say once a week?
Which method would be best for battery life? The potential difference could be 360 small top ups or 52 larger charges.
I look forward to you advice and suggestions
 

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Ion, Kona, 16 + 18 + 2020 Soul EV
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Personally I gave up charging up every night as soon as we had an EV over 200 miles. My routine now is to plug in for the night when I get to 30 or 40% and only take it up to 70% unless we have a longer journey. This gives us 200 miles for our usage and use it until around a 100 miles left before plugging in. It sort of means that for daily use we don't actually need such a large battery, but for longevity it's going to be very easy on the battery. The 100% range for long trips is of course useful to have.
 

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Hyundai Ioniq 28
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Much depends on the drive pattern of course. But in general, as long as the battery is kept between 20% and 80% there will be little difference whether it is charged daily or weekly at home. It has been said that the occasional 100% charge to balance the cells is also a good plan as long as the car is not kept at a full charge for very long.

Many people prefer to top up to 80% every time the car has been on a trip, on the basis that an unplanned journey may crop up at any time and if they had let it run down to, say 30% and planned to 'fill-up' next day they could be caught short and have to rush to a Rapid before leaving on the unplanned urgent trip. Just when time could be critical.
 

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^^^^ this is the key. Cycle life has a strongly non-linear relationship to depth of discharge, so running the pack over a smaller SoC range very significantly increases cycle life. The snag is that cycle life may not dominate battery life, and cell ageing may dominate, so the impact of treating the pack more carefully to increase the cycle life may or may not actually have any useful effect. EV batteries don't get cycled much, even charging every day is only 365 cycles a year, so not a lot for a pack that probably has an absolute worst case cycle life of 2,000 cycles, and more probably closer to 4,000 to 6,000 cycles. I put about 3,000 full cycles (almost 0% to 100% every day) on to the pack in my Prius PHEV over 5 years and when I sold it I couldn't detect any noticeable change in the EV mode range, so I suspect that some cells are a lot tougher than we give them credit for.
 

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Kia e-Niro 4 MY20
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Unlike the phev, you won’t charge it daily. Real world, having a Niro with range of 280ish miles I’m charging it to 80% when it needs charging. At the moment that can be less than once a week. Tending not to let it drop below 30% in case something comes up.

If it’s been a little while, ahead of a longer run out I’ll charge to 100%.

In practice the car is never left sitting at 100% for more than a few hours, spends most of it’s time 40-70% for any length of time. Without having to try that pretty much fits in with the ideals mentioned above.
 

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Personal circumstances also have a bearing on charging patterns, at least they do in our case. We try and keep both cars charged to allow for and emergency 120 mile trip, with a bit of contingency, so usually they get charged if they drop below about 170 miles remaining. That's just a function of having an ageing relative that live 120 miles away and to whom we might need to make an urgent visit with no time to charge beforehand or on route.
 

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Leaf 30kWh, Outlander PHEV
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We have Leaf30 that does 60 miles a day 6 days a week. We tend to charge it daily.
Our Outlander sees 15-30 miles 6 days a week and is charged on daily basis too.

If I had something that had 2x range, I’d do 50-80% charging for normal usage


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Puma GTE > Suzuki Jimny > BMW Z4 > Cupra Leon ST
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As others have stated for battery life as long as you are in the~ 20/80% range you are ok, but there is a catch....
Every time you charge, the battery use some of the energy for conditioning, so large charges are in general more efficient than smaller ones.

But you will have to balance this with your buffer for unexpected trips
 
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