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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm just wondering as to how much charge you'd likely get for charging an e-Niro for ONE hour at a 7kw charger and a 22kw charger ? I've seen several threads about CSS chargers and the rates which can be achieved on those, but I don't recall any regarding the levels of charge gained in an hour at the slower rates.
 

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I'm just wondering as to how much charge you'd likely get for charging an e-Niro for ONE hour at a 7kw charger and a 22kw charger ? I've seen several threads about CSS chargers and the rates which can be achieved on those, but I don't recall any regarding the levels of charge gained in an hour at the slower rates.
7kWh - or about 10% of the 64kWh battery capacity per hour.

Charge rate on ac is limited by the car's on-board charging capability, for the eNiro this is 7.2kW so that's the maximum rate. Doesn't matter if the charging post can offer more, the car can't use it.

PS for dc it's CCS (Combined Charging Standard).
 
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You are probably closer at 10% of the battery capacity given the losses in the charging system and the battery. I would guess 9-10% is realistic and will depend on battery temperature etc and SOC. The only way to know would be to try it over a range of both factors and see.
Unusually the KIA at least starts with the advertised 64kWh available when new unlike some other EVs.
PS Anyone know whether 3 phase charging is more efficient, and if so whether this results in more DC energy or just lower losses?
 

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You are probably closer at 10% of the battery capacity given the losses in the charging system and the battery. I would guess 9-10% is realistic and will depend on battery temperature etc and SOC. The only way to know would be to try it over a range of both factors and see.
Unusually the KIA at least starts with the advertised 64kWh available when new unlike some other EVs.
PS Anyone know whether 3 phase charging is more efficient, and if so whether this results in more DC energy or just lower losses?
Temperature/SoC generally don't matter for the 7kW AC charging. The Niro runs at 7.2kW all the way up to 100%.
I don't understand your question on 3 phase as the Niro will only ever use one of the 3 phase wires, so it's effectively identical to normal 7kW charging.
 
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Thanks, I wasn't aware of that so as you say an unnecessary question. I wonder why they only choose to use a single phase as surely that results in more smoothing being required?
 

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You don't have to worry too much about smoothing for a battery charger and it'll be a high frequency converter anyway probably, so easy to smooth. There is a downside to 3-phase charging in that the converter is likely to be less efficient operating on the single phase supply that we do most of the time (I.e. at home).
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the replies. Good to note therefore that I can happily go for a 7kw charge point even if all other people rush to the 22kw points, on the basis that there is no advantage to be gained. I'm assuming that if the e-Niro was equipped with a 3-Phase inverter, then it would charge a 3 times the rate of the 7kw charger - yes ?

In Ireland, all non-CCS chargers are free to use.
 

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You don't have to worry too much about smoothing for a battery charger and it'll be a high frequency converter anyway probably, so easy to smooth. There is a downside to 3-phase charging in that the converter is likely to be less efficient operating on the single phase supply that we do most of the time (I.e. at home).
To me it seems a bit unlikely that the 50 Hz mains power would be converted into DC to run a high frequency converter, to then provide DC to charge the main battery...
I'd agree with a 3 phase method implicitly offering a lower ripple for the charging voltage
 

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I'm assuming that if the e-Niro was equipped with a 3-Phase inverter, then it would charge a 3 times the rate of the 7kw charger - yes ?
Not very likely as most 3 phase chargers are 3.6kW and the cars parallel 2 chargers to give 7.2kW on single phase. On 3 phase they use all 3 chargers and charge at 11kW.
This is an option on the new Corsa for example
 

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Also Smart ED, and older Teslas.

Current generation Teslas can either charge at 11kW or 17 kW with three phase.
 

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To me it seems a bit unlikely that the 50 Hz mains power would be converted into DC to run a high frequency converter, to then provide DC to charge the main battery...
I'd agree with a 3 phase method implicitly offering a lower ripple for the charging voltage
It's even more complex than that in a Leaf - it's done to get good powerfactor on the ac side and provide the means to regulate current/voltage accurately during the constant current and constant voltage stages of charging. See leaf details here.... http://www.nissantechnicianinfo.mobi/htmlversions/2013_EV_Special/On-Board_Charger.html
 

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Interesting, but I think a 3 phase scheme is implicitly better for PFC...
A straight forward single phase rectifier would have to have a step-up transformer since the battery voltage is 400V ish. In a 3 phase rectifier you would still need a way to control voltage. You could do that crudely with a variac, but that's going to have poor power factor unless you add capacitance which would also need to be variable. In the end modern electronics just mean its easier and more efficient to do it with converters. Then there's the fact that hardly any of us (in the UK at least) have a 3 phase supply anyway!
 

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So in reality, what type of cars can take advantage of these 22kw chargers ?
Single phase charging at home on night rate costs €5.50 after that Ionity charging is the best value for rapids in Ireland if you have a 64KW battery. Just for info standard chargers are your granny cable. Fast chargers are your newly installed home charger or 7 to 22kw chargers at train stations or posts and rapid chargers are either ECars or ionity which are (by your eniro) either 47KW or 74KW fastest rate chargers enjoy all the benefits of evs in Ireland
 

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If you take an average of 4 miles/kWh, it |grossly| equals to:

7.2 kW x 1 hour x 4 = 28.8 miles of range added per hour
22 kW x 1 hour x 4 = 88 miles of range added per hour


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I see that German models come with a 3-Phase Option. If you somehow got this retrofitted later, I assume that you would then ben able to utilize the 22kw chargers to their fullest extent - yes ?
 
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