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As a heavy electricity user (~14,000 kWh/year) the Good Energy 7 hour Green Driver Fixed to 2023 tariff is nowhere near as good as my Octopus Go Faster 2030-0130 tariff.

Standing charge/dayDay rate/kWhNight rate/kWh
Octopus25.0p14.12p5.5p
Good Energy31.9p22.70p7.0p

Oh, and if anyone finds that information useful, my Octopus Energy referral code which is good for £50 to each of us is: share.octopus.energy/ivory-newt-650
 

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As a heavy electricity user (~14,000 kWh/year) the Good Energy 7 hour Green Driver Fixed to 2023 tariff is nowhere near as good as my Octopus Go Faster 2030-0130 tariff.

Standing charge/dayDay rate/kWhNight rate/kWh
Octopus25.0p14.12p5.5p
Good Energy31.9p22.70p7.0p

Oh, and if anyone finds that information useful, my Octopus Energy referral code which is good for £50 to each of us is: share.octopus.energy/ivory-newt-650
Remember GO is effectively a 1 year fixed tariff, the day rate went up to 16.03p for renewals and given the current wholesale cost I don't see it staying at that level for long. Octopus variable is 19p, their 2 year fix is 20.8p.
 

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It was the ~2 year fixed deal that attracted me to the Good Energy EV tariff. 7p/kW for 7 hours every night. for the next ~22 months seemed OK to me, and a lot better for our usage pattern than Go/Go Faster, even if we could get either Octopus tariff (which we can't, so it's a moot point).
 

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Doesn't the Octopus day rate vary dependent on where you are? And JH, why can't you get Go? Is it a connectivity issue?

Yes, no signal here, and too far from our neighbours (who also have no signal) to be able to use the mesh to piggy back the signal out to somewhere further up the hill behind us that may get a signal.
 

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I was fortunate enough to get my Go Faster tariff about a week before the rates went up so I got a good deal for a year. I know I'll probably get hammered next year when I renew but I have done the most I can to adjust our electricity usage and none of the other smart or EV tariffs offered by all the other companies come close to matching the benefits I get from using Octopus Go Faster. I find that it is approximately a 50:50 split between peak rate and off-peak rate.

Doesn't the Octopus day rate vary dependent on where you are?
I took the quotes for my region (Eastern).
 

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Currently we use 56% off-peak, 44% peak, over the course of a year. Once I get the batteries installed that should change to around 90% to 95% off-peak, 5% to 10% peak, with luck. Having 7 hours available at 7p/kWh is what swings it for us, mainly because we need 6 to 7 hours to charge up our storage heating system in winter. The house was designed around drawing power overnight for heating, before smart meters and their associated tariffs became available, so everything was optimised for Economy 7 (mainly because that's been around as a tariff for many decades).
 

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I actually live inside a storage heater, as my house has thick solid walls. Keeps cool in the summer and warm in the winter. Much better than your new-fangled cavity wall insulation. :)
I get a similar effect with cavity wall insulation and all internal walls and floors of concrete.
 

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I actually live inside a storage heater, as my house has thick solid walls. Keeps cool in the summer and warm in the winter. Much better than your new-fangled cavity wall insulation. :)
We don't have cavity walls, our whole walls are practically all insulation. The house was designed and built to have a decrement delay of tens of hours, with 300mm of high heat capacity insulation in the walls, 400mm of the same insulation in the roof and 300mm of low heat capacity foam under the floor. The 100mm thick concrete floor slab, which is entirely within the insulation envelope (even at the edges) is the storage heater, heated by cast-in pipes that were cable tied to the steel reinforcement bars before the concrete was poured. These pipes allow the use of a heat pump running on E7 to charge the slab with heat overnight, at an effective cost of around 2p/kWh, so probably cheaper than gas heating.

Our floor slab is the only concrete in the house, primarily because concrete produces a great deal of CO2 during it's manufacture.
 

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Wow! You certainly have a purpose-built eco house! Should have a grass roof, of course :) Mine is just very old.

This is a section I drew up for Building Control, to show how the insulation formed the full depth of the walls and roof and joined seamlessly with the foam that forms the foundations of the house:

Slope Font Parallel Rectangle Schematic


The walls use a variation on the Canadian Larsen Truss method, with an inner structural timber frame bearing on the concrete ring beam around the edge of the slab, supporting a non-load bearing ladder truss outside that holds the outer skin and contains the insulation.
 

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Donning my Sherlock Holmes deerstalker, I am guessing this is you!


Doffing my hat to you, sir!
 

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Smart charging ● Our hardware is designed to operate in coordination with grid demands, in periods of peak local, regional or national demand, charging may be interrupted or rate-limited for brief periods to facilitate grid manageme
Just saw this in the pod point manual online.
 

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Donning my Sherlock Holmes deerstalker, I am guessing this is you!


Doffing my hat to you, sir!

Thanks, yes, that's me. I did a couple of podcasts for Ben, some time ago now.
 

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Could try and get a plate for the heaters I suppose ;) but probably not needed as my EV has that bit covered!


I’ll look into it this week and let you know if I will use a referral. Thanks both.
I am not with Good Energy so please do use Jeremy's referral if you decide to go ahead.
 

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Remember GO is effectively a 1 year fixed tariff, the day rate went up to 16.03p for renewals and given the current wholesale cost I don't see it staying at that level for long. Octopus variable is 19p, their 2 year fix is 20.8p.
The current spell of almost no wind coupled with the nerves about gas stocks (since we have so much CCGT generation) and supply for the winter is sending the wholesale prices of gas and electricity ever upwards at the moment. The UK-Norway interconnect due to go live on 1 Oct should be able to help stabilize the futures and spot market prices for both since it could lessen the demand for CCGT.
 

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W
We don't have cavity walls, our whole walls are practically all insulation. The house was designed and built to have a decrement delay of tens of hours, with 300mm of high heat capacity insulation in the walls, 400mm of the same insulation in the roof and 300mm of low heat capacity foam under the floor. The 100mm thick concrete floor slab, which is entirely within the insulation envelope (even at the edges) is the storage heater, heated by cast-in pipes that were cable tied to the steel reinforcement bars before the concrete was poured. These pipes allow the use of a heat pump running on E7 to charge the slab with heat overnight, at an effective cost of around 2p/kWh, so probably cheaper than gas heating.

Our floor slab is the only concrete in the house, primarily because concrete produces a great deal of CO2 during it's manufacture.
We are moving off topic a bit here but it is interesting thinking about the heating insulation apsects. I live in a granite longere the walls are about a 1m thick south facing very few windows in the north side and those in the south are fairly small. originslly the upstairs was used as hay and apple storusge areas and the floors were standard terre battu (basically mud over floorboards). We have converted but in some rooms the terre battu was simply covered by concrete mixed with perlite to save weight though the floors where constructed to take a lot of weight. The house is about 180m2. Slate roof and multicouche thinsulate very popular here for insulation under the slate one third is cathedral so no additional insulation and in the other 2 thirds 400mm fibreglass as well on the flat ceilings. Upstairs all electric as well as a 50m sq office of similar construction sans any fibre glass in the upstairs ceiling as it is also cathedral. The office is lined with thinsulate walls and floor, the house has a relatively modest thickness of insulation behind the plasterboard on all the north walls and none on the south as it is mainly exposed stone. Downstair we also have a wood burning cooker and 2 woodburners and get through around 15 stere of wood as we are home a lot. Air heating is being pushed heavily here but I am still struggling to get my head around how it would work for me unless we installed a wet system with a water accumulator.i am tempted to just think of the high heating costs (around 18,000kwhplus wood) as the same as the capital investment needed to install an aerotherm system and I am not too concerned re CO2 on the basis France‘s supply is not coal or gas generated in the main. Not lugging so much wood about would be the one benefit and might be a factor as we age. So to finally reach my point solid granite house keeps its solar gain and once heated up does not seem to loose heat too quickly though once it has, it takes a long time to heat up but we never experience that as living there we are always working with the house still having retained heat. Does anyone know how efficient granite is as a storage radiator compared to concrete? Anyone else any views on aerotherm heating is such a construction?
 

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As a heavy electricity user (~14,000 kWh/year) the Good Energy 7 hour Green Driver Fixed to 2023 tariff is nowhere near as good as my Octopus Go Faster 2030-0130 tariff.

Standing charge/dayDay rate/kWhNight rate/kWh
Octopus25.0p14.12p5.5p
Good Energy31.9p22.70p7.0p

Oh, and if anyone finds that information useful, my Octopus Energy referral code which is good for £50 to each of us is: share.octopus.energy/ivory-newt-650
We all hear about rip off britain but maybe you do get good value in some quarters.
The best tarif for my needs will have a kwh cost of .1345 centimes cheap rate and .18 centimes full rate. I will only pay full rate Mon, Tues, Thurs and Fri from 6.40am until 10.40pm on those days cheap rate then taking over. For an 18kva supply the annual standing charge is 283.44 euro. On the face of it it looks more expensive than the rates above.
 
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