Speak EV - Electric Car Forums banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Hyundai Kona EV 64kw Premium SE
Joined
·
67 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So, I leave my car plugged in 24/7 when not in use - to Pod-Point, with Kona set to charge to 90% between 10pm-7am.

Is this a good idea, or is it better to let it run down and bit, and then charge that evening?

How do you do it? Is there even a 'best way' or is it personal preference?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
369 Posts
If you are leaving it plugged in when not in use, I'd set the charge to 80%. Try to avoid deep charge/discharge cycles as these are what age a battery. 20% to 80% is the recommended cycle and save 100% for the start of a road trip. It all depends on how many miles you do in a daily commute and keep some spare for the unexpected domestic crisis.
Mine ususally sits on the drive with 60% to 70% which is over 200 miles of range.

 

·
Registered
Kona PremSe64k 2020+bluelink +ohme
Joined
·
497 Posts
For the good of the battery it's good to ensure your battery gets to 100% once in a while, some people say monthly. Otherwise keep it within the 20-80% range when possible.

Besides doing this for battery health it is also the quickest to charge within that 20-80% range. That last 20% can take a long time, which doesn't matter so much overnight.

Finally because I am on the Octopus Agile tariff with an Ohme charger it is better financially to keep the car topped up to near 80% daily rather than let the battery run down and do a bigger recharge. It helps the system make best use of ultra cheap charging rates, including actually being paid to charge your car on a few nights (usually after a lot of sunshine and/or wind.)
 

·
Registered
Hyundai Kona EV 64kw Premium SE
Joined
·
67 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
For the good of the battery it's good to ensure your battery gets to 100% once in a while, some people say monthly. Otherwise keep it within the 20-80% range when possible.
Thank you! :)



Kona EV 64Kw Premium SE in Galactic Grey
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
For the good of the battery it's good to ensure your battery gets to 100% once in a while, some people say monthly. Otherwise keep it within the 20-80% range when possible.

Besides doing this for battery health it is also the quickest to charge within that 20-80% range. That last 20% can take a long time, which doesn't matter so much overnight.

Finally because I am on the Octopus Agile tariff with an Ohme charger it is better financially to keep the car topped up to near 80% daily rather than let the battery run down and do a bigger recharge. It helps the system make best use of ultra cheap charging rates, including actually being paid to charge your car on a few nights (usually after a lot of sunshine and/or wind.)
On a home charger with max 7kw charging it does not taper down towards the end. That's only important with DC quick charging.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,141 Posts
I just plug it in when I get home and unplug it when I leave.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
For the good of the battery it's good to ensure your battery gets to 100% once in a while, some people say monthly.
Why is it good to charge to 100% one in a while? I thought Lithium ion batteries always fare better if you avoid charging to the max?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
369 Posts
Why is it good to charge to 100% one in a while? I thought Lithium ion batteries always fare better if you avoid charging to the max?
Cell balancing. A 100% charge every month or so takes all the cells to maximum charge. A 100% slow charge is fine if you discharge soon afterwards. Lithium ion batteries do not like sitting at 100% charge for long periods.
 

·
Registered
Kona 2020 Premium SE 64kW
Joined
·
33 Posts
Cell balancing. A 100% charge every month or so takes all the cells to maximum charge. A 100% slow charge is fine if you discharge soon afterwards. Lithium ion batteries do not like sitting at 100% charge for long periods.
I agree however I would ask a question similar to one I raised in another thread. How many owners are aware that charging to 100% on a regular basis in not a good thing? If it's mentioned in the manual I for one didn't notice it and only became aware of potential problems from checking forums like this. I suspect most people don't have a clue they're affecting battery life. They'll get home, plug in and let it charge fully so as to have maximum range ready for the next trip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
673 Posts
I agree however I would ask a question similar to one I raised in another thread. How many owners are aware that charging to 100% on a regular basis in not a good thing? If it's mentioned in the manual I for one didn't notice it and only became aware of potential problems from checking forums like this. I suspect most people don't have a clue they're affecting battery life. They'll get home, plug in and let it charge fully so as to have maximum range ready for the next trip.
But does it really affect battery life? We know that the customer does not access the full battery capacity so you are probably never charging to 100%. In addition, Kona have designed the charging system and given a 100,000 mile warranty so why should the customer worry?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,185 Posts
We have a tendency to overthink things on here. The chances are that unless you charge it every night up to 100% so that it never goes below about 90%, you won't have any measurable effect on the battery for years. It's the same with rapid charging; deep wisdom says don't do it too much. Stageshoot proved you can do it as much as you like and not have any effect after 60k miles.
 

·
Registered
Kona PremSe64k 2020+bluelink +ohme
Joined
·
497 Posts
But does it really affect battery life? We know that the customer does not access the full battery capacity so you are probably never charging to 100%. In addition, Kona have designed the charging system and given a 100,000 mile warranty so why should the customer worry?
As a slight aside the Kona 64kw battery is actually larger 71kw? Not all EVs have that headroom. This space helps the Kona charging regime work well over the long term with less degradation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
An OBD2 reader will reveal that if you charge to 100% the BMS charge is indicated as 97%. If 64 kWh equals 97% it would actually be a 66.9 kWh battery. So there might be a buffer of 3 kWh at the top end of the battery.

The lower you run the battery, the closer the display and the BMS battery SOC numbers get, which might be an indication of no lower end buffer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,185 Posts
It's about 67kWh as I understand it from Tesla Bjorn's calculations on YouTube.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
According to the manual:

View attachment 134252

Discuss...
This selection of part of a paragraph distorts the meaning of the original statement - it is a good illustration of the sort of misinformation that social media is universally condemned for.
In fact the corollary of the complete paragraph, as Hyundai sees it, is that unless discharging takes SoC below 20%, fully charging the Kona is not necessary...
 

·
Registered
Kona Electric, EU base with heat pump
Joined
·
426 Posts
... which is what I understood, so having never let my SoC go under 20% I've almost never charged to 100%. However that has resulted in one "cell" differing by 0.04 V.
The wording is ambiguous and from my experience I would support charging once a month to 100% no matter what.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
... which is what I understood, so having never let my SoC go under 20% I've almost never charged to 100%. However that has resulted in one "cell" differing by 0.04 V.
The wording is ambiguous and from my experience I would support charging once a month to 100% no matter what.
”Resulted in”? Or occurred at the same time, with no other ”obvious” explanation? More misinformation?
...not that I would do anything differently of course... 🤔
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top