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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have just swapped my old Nissan Leaf for a new 64kW Hyundai Kona and having run the battery down to around 30% decided to charge her back up. I have a ChanrgeMaster 3.3kW charger on the wall so plugged her in. 15 hours later I have just over 70% battery charge. Now that seems a very long time for very little charge! I would swear that the car isn't seeing the charger as a 3.3kW unit and is just running a trickle charge but :
1. I don't know if that is even possible
2. Does the car even have the ability to draw different power depending on availability
3. I appreciate that the batteries are considerable larger than the 1st Generation Nissan Leaf unit but should it really take THAT long
must more experienced minds than mind I am hoping will have words of wisdom to add here
 

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15 hours at 3.3kw should have delivered 50kwh. So not enough to fully charge, but since you started at 30% it should have managed to fill it...

Is there perhaps a charge timer set on the car?
 

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You'll lose around 10% electrical power thx to resistance losses etc, so max you'll see into the battery is ~3 kW. (FWIW Lowest current that charging can take place is 6A, so on a low-volatge 220 mains that's1.32 kW). So 15 hours at 3kW = 45 kWh in your Ev. That's 70.3% of your 64 kWh capacity. But you started with 30%, so have only seen 40 more go in, so the actual rate was more like 1.7 kW.

Have you got a timer set? Any preheating that could have swallowed a few kWh? Has the car got a variable "charge to X%" limit set, like ID.3 can have?
 

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You'll lose around 10% electrical power thx to resistance losses etc, so max you'll see into the battery is ~3 kW.
Generally thats already accounted for when people say "3.3kw"... Such chargers are usually 16A, and will output ~3.8kw AC on a typical 240v supply. Unless the car doesnt pull the full 16A, or some chargers i've seen rated at 15A rather than 16 for whatever reason.
 

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I have just swapped my old Nissan Leaf for a new 64kW Hyundai Kona and having run the battery down to around 30% decided to charge her back up. I have a ChanrgeMaster 3.3kW charger on the wall so plugged her in. 15 hours later I have just over 70% battery charge. Now that seems a very long time for very little charge! I would swear that the car isn't seeing the charger as a 3.3kW unit and is just running a trickle charge but :
1. I don't know if that is even possible
2. Does the car even have the ability to draw different power depending on availability
3. I appreciate that the batteries are considerable larger than the 1st Generation Nissan Leaf unit but should it really take THAT long
must more experienced minds than mind I am hoping will have words of wisdom to add here
The EV screen has a "Charge Management" section - in there is a choice of AC charging limit setting and separately a setting for AC charging current - check these...
 

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I am also using a 3.3 kilowatt chargemaster wallcharger on my e-Niro 64kwh. It increases the battery by just under 5% an hour so I would expect 15 hours to increase the battery by about 70%. Does the Kona have different charge levels? The e-Niro has three different charge speeds and if that was set below the maximum it would slow the charge further.
 

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could be the BMS slowing it down because of battery temperature. lithium batteries cant be charged at sub 0 temperatures and on very low temperatures is advisable to charge very slowly to avoid damaging the cells
 

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could be the BMS slowing it down because of battery temperature. lithium batteries cant be charged at sub 0 temperatures and on very low temperatures is advisable to charge very slowly to avoid damaging the cells
I have been using the granny charger for this very reason. 12 hours or so to charge my Ioniq 28 to full.
 

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could be the BMS slowing it down because of battery temperature. lithium batteries cant be charged at sub 0 temperatures and on very low temperatures is advisable to charge very slowly to avoid damaging the cells
It could also be that at lower temps, some of the charge power is being used to warm up the battery instead of charging.
 

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The "low" temperatures are highly unlikely to be a factor. In the eNiro the BMW doesn't even think about heating the battery until -10'c, and I expect the Kona is much the same. Never heard of throttling at AC speeds anyway - high power DC maybe. If Kona shares the same complex timing arrangements as the eNiro I suspect that'll be the reason. I came from a Leaf and found myself baffled by the dependencies on timers etc to start with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Lots of input here , all very much appreciated thank you all. I think I can honestly say I am more confused now than I was before. Don't think there are any timers set but I will go and check through the menus to see the current limiters aren't set to minimum ,although not really sure what to do if they are. I foolishly assumed that the default setup would be pretty efficient if not the most efficient way to run things.
 

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Well... the eNiro has two charge limits you can set, one for AC one for DC. Then there's an off-peak electricity timer, which allows you to choose a start time and end time. But to get it to do anything you have set a target departure time! Then you choose between using only off-peak electricity or prioritising the off-peak hours. If you choose only off-peak hours it'll use those to try and get to your target level prior to your departure time. If you chose priority of to off-peak it'll use whatever hours it needs to reach your target level by your departure time!

It gives you a lot of flexibility, and if you're on Octopus Go (for example) and know that you'll only need to charge to 70% to leave for the office (remember them??!) at 0630hrs it is pretty easy to configure and then forget about. I'm on Agile, and rarely work away from home for now, so charge much less frequently, so it has to be fiddled with each time to get the cheapest charges :(

The Leaf was soooo much simpler :)
 

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Lots of input here , all very much appreciated thank you all. I think I can honestly say I am more confused now than I was before. Don't think there are any timers set but I will go and check through the menus to see the current limiters aren't set to minimum ,although not really sure what to do if they are. I foolishly assumed that the default setup would be pretty efficient if not the most efficient way to run things.
If there are timers, they will show on the dash display when you switch off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
If there are timers, they will show on the dash display when you switch off.
I just checked my setup and there are no timers , the current restriction are set at maximum so I have to start to assume there is something wrong with the Battery Management System . Maybe I need to run the batteries down a little and then find a DC charger to check the fast charging
 

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It could also be that at lower temps, some of the charge power is being used to warm up the battery instead of charging.
This suggestion seems to be in accord with the discussion and comments in this thread started by stageshoot who has provided many graphical plots of charging characteristics for his two Konas, over > 50k miles of use.
 

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I have a ChanrgeMaster 3.3kW charger on the wall so plugged her in. 15 hours later I have just over 70% battery charge. Now that seems a very long time for very little charge! I would swear that the car isn't seeing the charger as a 3.3kW unit and is just running a trickle charge but :
When you start a charge there should be a display on the dash telling you what the charge rate is and estimated time to reach the set limit.
See what that says. It could be the car/charger combo is presenting as a granny charger.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I will have to check things a little more carefully next time I run a charge. (with lock-down still in force that may be a while as there is nowhere to go to run the batteries down)
To be honest I am surprised that Hyundai don't have an app for the phone to monitor the charging process, most others seem to have something
 

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To be honest I am surprised that Hyundai don't have an app for the phone to monitor the charging process, most others seem to have something
You said you have a new car. The new ones do have an app, though I don't know what it actually covers.

If you meant 'new to you' then that's a different game as the first couple of years in the UK don't have any connectivity built in.
 

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I will have to check things a little more carefully next time I run a charge. (with lock-down still in force that may be a while as there is nowhere to go to run the batteries down)
To be honest I am surprised that Hyundai don't have an app for the phone to monitor the charging process, most others seem to have something
You can "burn" off some of the battery charge by just running the heater at high for 30 minutes or so - that should allow you to start a charge to see the indicated in-car charging rate on the dash
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
You said you have a new car. The new ones do have an app, though I don't know what it actually covers.

If you meant 'new to you' then that's a different game as the first couple of years in the UK don't have any connectivity built in.
Thanks, no-one told me about the Bluelink app. Just downloaded it , that may help
 
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