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Discussion Starter #1
I just cleaned my breakpads on my Kona '19
I took of the wheel, removed to calliper body (2 x14mm screws), and took out the pads. Cleaned all and assembled it all again.
I did that on both sides on the front.
Now I have a warning/error in the dash saying "Check regenerative brakes"
AS far as I can feel, the brakes are OK, and regen. is also working !
 

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Sounds like you need a reset of some kind or another. Possibly by clearing the error code.possibly by disconnecting the 12v battery, strictly following Hyundai's procedure for this.
 

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The same question appear over at InsideEVs two weeks ago but the OP never got back to indicate how it was fixed. I suggested disconnecting the 12V battery for an hour.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I had the in for 30.000km service today. They reset the error.
The car knows the position of the cylinder - how long time it must be activated before there must be a resistance. If this is not the case the system assumes there is an error/leak. I had pushed the cylinder a little back to get more space.
My guess it is not possible to replace the pads - DIY -on a Kona.
 

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I had the in for 30.000km service today. They reset the error.
The car knows the position of the cylinder - how long time it must be activated before there must be a resistance. If this is not the case the system assumes there is an error/leak. I had pushed the cylinder a little back to get more space.
My guess it is not possible to replace the pads - DIY -on a Kona.
There are so many things now that you can't do on modern cars without the proper equipment. I remember my first car, a beat up old Austin 1100. I used to tinker with that all the time.
 

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I had the in for 30.000km service today. They reset the error.
The car knows the position of the cylinder - how long time it must be activated before there must be a resistance. If this is not the case the system assumes there is an error/leak. I had pushed the cylinder a little back to get more space.
My guess it is not possible to replace the pads - DIY -on a Kona.
It is quite possible that the pads will last longer than the 8yr battery warranty! I guess it will be the discs which wear thin first.
 

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It is quite possible that the pads will last longer than the 8yr battery warranty! I guess it will be the discs which wear thin first.
Not sure that the car will know the position of the cylinder (brake caliper piston). There are no sensors in the caliper that do this.

There are other issues at play.

Best bet is to have a Hyundai specific code reset tool to hand, one that can properly interrogate all vehicle systems such as airbags, brakes, infotainment, battery management etc.
 

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As it has the ability to apply brakes for hill-hold and emergency braking, I'd expect there is some sensing in the master cylinder, so it can probably tell when the point at which the brakes engage suddenly changes
 

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As it has the ability to apply brakes for hill-hold and emergency braking, I'd expect there is some sensing in the master cylinder, so it can probably tell when the point at which the brakes engage suddenly changes
I can assure you that cars have had hill hold and emergency braking functions for many years and no measurement of the master cylinder (piston) position is required to achieve this function.
 

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What I expect happened is that the motorised, ballscrew-driven piston-and-cylinder pump that is used on the Kona to provide power assist to the master cylinder ran out of stroke trying to build up pressure in self-test, or when the pedal was first pressed. The mistake was to not step on the pedal a few times before powering the car 'on' to bring the pedal up to the normal height.
 

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What I expect happened is that the motorised, ballscrew-driven piston-and-cylinder pump that is used on the Kona to provide power assist to the master cylinder ran out of stroke trying to build up pressure in self-test, or when the pedal was first pressed. The mistake was to not step on the pedal a few times before powering the car 'on' to bring the pedal up to the normal height.
Got it👍👍👍
 
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