Speak EV - Electric Car Forums banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Newbie Ioniq driver (2020 model) and a total newbie in charging. Today was the first time I charged using a public charger. It was a Plug-N-Go Type 2 (22kW AC capable) that had no display. It all worked fine, although at 30p/kW was more than I'd have liked!

Anyway, when I got back after 1.5 hours, the app said 10.299kW had been provided and I was charged accordingly.
That fits with what I'd expect from the car's built-in charger (6.6kW, IIRC)

But the car's SOC gauge didn't seem to show the expected 25% increase afterwards. Maybe my man-maths is bad, so I was hoping that somewhere I can check against a display of what the Ioniq thinks it received during that charging period.

Anyone know if this is available and where I should look in the Ioniq's menus?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Newbie Ioniq driver (2020 model) and a total newbie in charging. Today was the first time I charged using a public charger. It was a Plug-N-Go Type 2 (22kW AC capable) that had no display. It all worked fine, although at 30p/kW was more than I'd have liked!

Anyway, when I got back after 1.5 hours, the app said 10.299kW had been provided and I was charged accordingly.
That fits with what I'd expect from the car's built-in charger (6.6kW, IIRC)

But the car's SOC gauge didn't seem to show the expected 25% increase afterwards. Maybe my man-maths is bad, so I was hoping that somewhere I can check against a display of what the Ioniq thinks it received during that charging period.

Anyone know if this is available and where I should look in the Ioniq's menus?
hi
i had a 28kw ioniq on loan and now have a later 38kw new model and no dont think there is anyway on either to check what the car took onboard other then the miles gained and increase in percent
but any short comeing is usualy inline loss as in the way it passes though the cars charger and any thing thats running at the time,
 

·
Registered
Ioniq 38kwh 2020
Joined
·
608 Posts
Newbie Ioniq driver (2020 model) and a total newbie in charging. Today was the first time I charged using a public charger. It was a Plug-N-Go Type 2 (22kW AC capable) that had no display. It all worked fine, although at 30p/kW was more than I'd have liked!

Anyway, when I got back after 1.5 hours, the app said 10.299kW had been provided and I was charged accordingly.
That fits with what I'd expect from the car's built-in charger (6.6kW, IIRC)

But the car's SOC gauge didn't seem to show the expected 25% increase afterwards. Maybe my man-maths is bad, so I was hoping that somewhere I can check against a display of what the Ioniq thinks it received during that charging period.

Anyone know if this is available and where I should look in the Ioniq's menus?
There isn't any way as far as I know. How far off expected were you?
There will be losses of maybe 10%-15% just in conversion.
Also, if the battery is cold the battery heater will kick in (you can actually hear it if you aren't in a noisy location, it's a whirring and occasional faint popping sound) If you charged first thing this morning the battery could have been surprisingly cold due to the low overnight temperatures.
The battery heater is 2.2kW and I believe operates at battery temperatures below 20C. It heats at around 0.5C per minute, so it's possible the heater ran for 20-40 minutes or so, which could account for 1kWh or more.
Charge below 3.7kW and apparently the heater doesn't operate, unless it is very cold (ie sub zero).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks both. My man-maths said that as I was about 70% charged when I parked up, I expected quite a bit over 90%, but the car said 86%. This was at about 11am and about 11C, after a 40 mile drive at 60mph or so, so I'd assume the battery was at a decent temperature.

Stupidly, I hadn't checked the actual percentage before charging, but for sure, the blue LEDs on the top of the dash showed over 66% (two solid, one blinking at the point I started charging).

It's no biggie, and I don't feel 'cheated', but I should really try to understand it, so I don't 'under-plan' my recharging stops in the future.
 

·
Registered
Ioniq 38kwh 2020
Joined
·
608 Posts
Thanks both. My man-maths said that as I was about 70% charged when I parked up, I expected quite a bit over 90%, but the car said 86%. This was at about 11am and about 11C, after a 40 mile drive at 60mph or so, so I'd assume the battery was at a decent temperature.

Stupidly, I hadn't checked the actual percentage before charging, but for sure, the blue LEDs on the top of the dash showed over 66% (two solid, one blinking at the point I started charging).

It's no biggie, and I don't feel 'cheated', but I should really try to understand it, so I don't 'under-plan' my recharging stops in the future.
Driving 40miles at 60mph probably wouldn't have added a lot of heat to the battery to be fair. Especially after a pretty cold night.
But if you are paying 30p a kWh, you may as well find a rapid imo, Eg quick stop at a Lidl for 25p a kWh or instavolt at 35p.
 
  • Like
Reactions: goldtop

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
You were charged what the charger used (ie 10.299kw) not what your battery received, which would be somewhere between 8.5kw & 9.3kw (not exact math). There's a conversion liss of 10 -15% that you pay for.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
You can check it easily with elm327 adapter. Cumulative energy charged (kWh) and Cumulative charge current (Ah) since the car was new are shown in Car Scanner Elm Obd2 app (iOS and Android). So just compare values at the beginning and at the end of charging.


Screenshot_20210419-085333.jpg



Screenshot_20210419-085423.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,780 Posts
I've just partially charged my Kia Soul overnight and back of a *** packet maths says theres a 10% loss from what's going in to what's getting into the battery.
As said by others the charger reports what its putting in and the car what it receives, the difference is the efficiency loss.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Driving 40miles at 60mph probably wouldn't have added a lot of heat to the battery to be fair. Especially after a pretty cold night.
But if you are paying 30p a kWh, you may as well find a rapid imo, Eg quick stop at a Lidl for 25p a kWh or instavolt at 35p.
Yes - something to bear in mind for the future. In this particular location, it was Hobson's Choice at the destination where we wanted to be. So en route charging didn't factor into my thoughts.

As an ICE-car driver I always fill to the brim, and then forget about fuel for 3+ weeks, until I fill up again at the same petrol station on the way to/from work. I've got to adapt my brain for EV refuelling.

Later this week, I'll try out a rapid somewhere.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
You were charged what the charger used (ie 10.299kw) not what your battery received, which would be somewhere between 8.5kw & 9.3kw (not exact math). There's a conversion liss of 10 -15% that you pay for.
I've just partially charged my Kia Soul overnight and back of a *** packet maths says theres a 10% loss from what's going in to what's getting into the battery.
As said by others the charger reports what its putting in and the car what it receives, the difference is the efficiency loss.
OK - useful to know. I'd a vague notion that EV charging efficiency was around 95%.

Thanks all. :)
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top