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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

The Citroen AMI is out in several countries (EU) and I am a happy owner of one of the first to be sold in Spain. Many people incorrectly try to compare it to a [regular] car -- which it is not and it is not meant to be. It is a great vehicle for what it is and I think it definitely has it's place and it's market. I am very happy with it so far both in functionality and quality (although the purchase process and Citroen's complete lack of customer support definitely was/is a let down).

Now that my sales speech is done....

I wanted to put a feeler out there for anyone who has one and has done any interesting customisations or hacks. I am primarily interested in any battery hacks or OBDC reading or hacking that has been done.

Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Just to start things off, below are a few resources that I have found a for accessories and add-ons. I have no connection to any of them, nor do I have any personal experience with any of them except where mentioned. All sites indicate that they offer international shipping:
  • Mister Auto (ES) - This site is referenced by Citroen directly and sells Citroen OEM replacement parts from aftermarket accessories to mechanical bits to original replacement body parts. The site appears to exist in several countries (replace .es with .it or .com, maybe others), with each country selling the same items, as far as I can tell.
  • Citroen Ami Store (IT) - Sells aftermarket products. The website is a bit odd in that it lists products that are not actually available (/for sale) and at the same time the descriptions for what do exist are very lacking. That said, they have been quick and friendly to answer questions that I have sent by email.
  • ami-more.com (FR) - Sell a good selection of aftermarket products. I have purchased from them and they have been very friendly, helpful and responsive through emails. After some questions back and forth, they provided me personalised info for something I was doing and actually customised an item that I purchased from them.
  • My-Ami.fr (FR) - Sells a range of products including a good selection of impressive looking sticker/decoration kits.
For those with 3D printers, I have also found a few things on thingiverse.com. I have been toying with the idea of getting a printer (for years!), but have not yet taken the plunge.

Any other sites, suggestions or info is appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I like the rental model - but assume you don’t own the car - you have to find one and drive it around the city

what’s RRP?

JJ
I purchased mine outright but there are several options. The prices listed are in Spain. The prices vary in other countries.
  • Paying up front runs €7100 - €8500, depending on the model.
  • There is a monthly payment plan which runs from €20/month, with a €3500 initial payment (and a similar final payment)
  • In limited cities there is the "Free2Move" plan, which is basically the car sharing model that you mention. (And actually seems to also offer many Citroen models). I am not in a city where this is offered, so cant say much about it.
Spain also offers a sizeable electric car rebate on the purchase -- near 20%.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Max speed limited to 30mph - shame

JJ
30mph is 30mph (45km/h), yes, but how important that is depends on each person's environment and use case. Clearly it can be an issue in certain locations/environments, however I think that some of the "knee-jerk" reaction to this speed restriction is similar to what we see with "range-anxiety".

As another thought, why do we not have the same complaints about scooters? Scooters with a yellow number plate in Spain are also limited to 45km/h, and have exactly the same licensing requirements (ie. minimal test, restricted drivers licence, young drivers, etc). To play the devil's advocate, I could complain that scooters have no doors, no protection from the elements, are more dangerous in accidents, less visible on the roads, have no storage, etc.... you get the idea. It is all about setting expectations and finding what fits for each persons needs.

Remember, the AMI was designed to fit into the L6 category and as a "mobility vehicle", using Citroens terms. As such, it doesnt need to conform to L7 or 'car' standards and the related safety and testing requirements, etc. Being an L6, Citroen was able to create and market a viable vehicle with a very reasonable price and still maintain something very functional -- for those who fit the use-case. One cant compare an L6 to a 'car'.
 
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