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When i bought the car about 8 months ago I paid for Scott's Safeguard to be applied to the bodywork (after a large discount). I also got a big case of Scott's car cleaning materials. So far I have only used the Scott's Paint Shampoo and Protector which has now run out.
Before this car I used Autoglym products, before that it was Turtle Wax, before that it was probably Fairy Liquid (I am quite old).
So I wonder if you can recommend the best shampoo to use to replace the Scott's one please.
Also I was going to use Autoglym Clean Wheels after I washed the car today but it does say it should only be used on lacquered alloy, painted or plastic surfaces as it contains phosphoric acid. Is it ok to use.
I was sure @Chronos posted an ultimate cleaning guide soon after he joined but I cant find it, or maybe I got this wrong (apologies @Chronos if I have).
 

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Hello @Freebird No apologies needed, It wasn't an ultimate cleaning guide as such it was just a post within a post if you will,
I don't trust anyone cleaning my car just because they would lack the passion that I have towards things I own with that being said here is my cleaning regimen,
Pressure washer and fill up the bottle with a heavy degreaser because you want to take off every bit of wax that Might have been applied to the paint at any given point.
Spray the devil out of the bodywork and let the foam soak for a good 3-5 mins and then use something like thisKent Q2429 2-in-1 Microfibre Noodle Wash Mitt: Amazon.co.uk: Car & Motorbike and rub thoroughly while rinsing in a separate bucket.
you will know when to stop when you will see the sticky road / brake grime that won't come off the bodywork at this point rinse the car and bring your clay bar out, lots of elbow grease and plenty of patience are needed for this step and trust me this is what will make your car look different.
pick a certain area and go with the clay bar on it in straight lines to avoid creating swirl marks and scratching the clear coat when the clay bar gets dirty just fold it over and start again.
Generally speaking you want to stop the claying process when you don't hear any scraping noise as you pass your finger on the paint.
Now rinse again then dry the car very well. I advise you to start this process in the morning on a sunny dayand begin the following mid day.
First I apply 2 coats of PTFE sealant something like this Autobright Super Endurance Zonyl PTFE Paint Sealant 500ml + Super Plush Microfibre and AB Applicator: Amazon.co.uk: Car & Motorbike following the instructions on the bottle.
Then I apply as many coats as possible of my chosen wax Dodo Juice DJDWP30 Carnauba Car Wax, Diamond White, 30 ml: Amazon.co.uk: Car & Motorbike

last but not least get a buffing microfibre cloth and take your time buffing every panel until you get the shine you want.
Sealing and waxing are applicable to the windscreen as well and it makes a great difference if you do a lot of motorway driving.
As for the wheels, I use degreaser + plenty of Acetic acid AKA Vinegar :D
I have personally used the products mentioned above hence I linked them but you can buy anything that resembles them at your convenience.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks very much @Chronos just what I needed, I knew I had seen it on here some time ago. Hopefully with the good weather coming I can try this very soon.
 

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I'd avoid an acidic wheel cleaner, they can be very aggressive. I use Valet Pro Billberry wheel cleaner, generally diluted 5:1 for dirty wheels with stubborn marks. I use in a spray bottle (making sure keep my eyes covered and not breathing in any product mist), and agitate it with a wheel brush (I actually use a product called wheel woolie), leave it for a minute or two then agitate again before rinsing off. If there are any serious marks left after this I'll use a product called Dragons Breath which is designed to removed bonded iron contamination, but rarely need to do this more than once or twice a year at most.

If you really want to get some serious tips on cleaning/protecting your car without damaging the finishes then take a look at the Detailing World forums, you'll get some useful tips and product reviews/recommendations from users there.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks very much @SHL-Kelso for the information, I will now get my equipment organised and wait for a sunny day/weekend. Hopefully very soon.
 

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Don't get me started on a 2 (or even 3) bucket wash method with separate mits for car body and wheels, and various special towels for drying off to prevent water marks (no blades or chamois cloths here) :)

That's before I start obsessing on paint defects and break out the full paint decontamination and correction kit! It's a slippery slope that ends up with washes taking an hour or two, and the odd weekend polishing and waxing/sealing. That said the results are stunning even if it does become an obsessive pastime :)
 

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Just goes to show, each to their own.

A pressure washer is the devil's own work, I would not let my car near one, and nor would I clay-bar it except one every 10 years maybe.

Sounds like a recipe to wear your car out.

Whatever you do, the best bit of advice was something I learned from a RR aeroengine that had become destroyed because someone used tap water instead of deionised water as required. You'd be surprised the ionic content of tap water that sets to work to corrode your car. I don't go to the lengths of buying the stuff, I use rain water collected in a butt and after allowing sedimentation time to avoid any grit in suspension. A drip or two of baby shampoo into a bucket already filled with water, then squeeze one sponge-worth over the body work, then another and wipe very gently, squeeze that out, and repeat, always take a squeezed out sponge to the bucket and suck water up, the water stays clean. You should get through 4 or 5 buckets worth for the car.

'Elbow grease' on paintwork sounds nightmarish, at several levels.
 

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Thanks for the advice and smiles, now I am retired I can find time to do a good job of cleaning the car, something I have always wanted to do but was busy with work. There is of course the added bonus of hiding from the wife. You have to admit that these cars were finished in colours superior to the average motor and they look so good when shining. Mine is Crystal Claret (certainly not plain old red) and its always getting comments on the colour. By the way @donald a few months ago while washing the car an old chap (even older than me) who used to own car sales garages came over to look at the car and he said the same thing. In fact he said I should wash the car when it was actually raining and not use tap water. I haven't gone that far but I do use rainwater collected in a water but with a pump in the butt to a hosepipe which doesn't blast the car as the pressure isn't excessive, and it really does seem to make a difference.
 

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Just goes to show, each to their own.

A pressure washer is the devil's own work, I would not let my car near one, and nor would I clay-bar it except one every 10 years maybe.

Sounds like a recipe to wear your car out.

Whatever you do, the best bit of advice was something I learned from a RR aeroengine that had become destroyed because someone used tap water instead of deionised water as required. You'd be surprised the ionic content of tap water that sets to work to corrode your car. I don't go to the lengths of buying the stuff, I use rain water collected in a butt and after allowing sedimentation time to avoid any grit in suspension. A drip or two of baby shampoo into a bucket already filled with water, then squeeze one sponge-worth over the body work, then another and wipe very gently, squeeze that out, and repeat, always take a squeezed out sponge to the bucket and suck water up, the water stays clean. You should get through 4 or 5 buckets worth for the car.

'Elbow grease' on paintwork sounds nightmarish, at several levels.
I use a very similiar method, rain water but I have a mitt/brush in one hand a watering can in the other with a rose to keep a flow of water while you wash to flush away any grit/particles. The pressure washer is reserved for cleaning patios, not cars.
 

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Thanks for the advice and smiles, now I am retired I can find time to do a good job of cleaning the car, something I have always wanted to do but was busy with work. There is of course the added bonus of hiding from the wife. You have to admit that these cars were finished in colours superior to the average motor and they look so good when shining. Mine is Crystal Claret (certainly not plain old red) and its always getting comments on the colour. By the way @donald a few months ago while washing the car an old chap (even older than me) who used to own car sales garages came over to look at the car and he said the same thing. In fact he said I should wash the car when it was actually raining and not use tap water. I haven't gone that far but I do use rainwater collected in a water but with a pump in the butt to a hosepipe which doesn't blast the car as the pressure isn't excessive, and it really does seem to make a difference.
Red, sorry - Crystal Claret cars always look great with a good shine on them, yours looks great.

I've washed cars in the rain before, partly because I don't like making work for myself.

Must get round to fitting a pump (with ceramic filter) to my water butts, been meaning to do it for years.
 

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Yes, flowing water, agreed, or just while it is raining (which I do if it is raining - i.e. doesn't bother me to wash a car in the rain), is also a good bet. Washing with rain water, or in the rain, leaves zero streaks. There is no need to wipe it over, it simply dries cleanly.

One reason you need to add shampoo and surfactants to tap water is precisely because of the ionics that settle out and leave smear marks. You completely eliminate that issue by using deionised/rain water.

In fact, I'd go so far as to say you never get such a clean car as when you use rain water, because unless you live in some super-soft water area you will spend ages chammying off the tap water and still get streaks.
 

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Chronos has posted some excellent advice and I share his view that you must use the correct products with a modern technique. Gone are the days of a quick cold wash with zipwax and a manky sponge......

I would recommend Autoglym bodywork conditioner car wash, leaves a rain repellant finnish and is excellent at cutting through traffic film and road dirt. For microfibre cloths Costco sell packs of 36 for circa £13 which are handy for wheel cleaning and general interior cleaning as well. Halfords run a "three for the price of two " summer car car cleaning products offer so I tend to pick up my Autoglym car washes in packs of three.

My tips for washing is to use two buckets ( one for cleaning one other for rinsing ) with grit guards in both buckets, pre wash using snow foam, then rinse. Next I wash the car with a microfibre noodle mit ( GTech mits I recommend, look on EBay ). Then rinse again with a final dry down with a specific thick towel microfibre. I then use detailing spray on all the black bits which leaves a protective shine. I also use alloy wheel sealant which repels brake dust plus I will use rain repellant on my windows as well.

As previously mentioned you can also clay bar if needed. Definitely worth fitting a water filter to your hose as limescale can dull the paint. Worth all the effort.

There is a person on YouTube called CarcleaningGuru who posts some car cleaning tips.

Happy washing.....
 

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@HandyAndy Science !!!! :D
@Freebird I'll post a bunch of HQ pictures after getting my car washed, my car is Lithium White and I still am capable of bringing a nice mirror effect out of it, it's safe to say that I must be doing something right :rolleyes:
 
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