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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I mean driving tips specifically related to the car, not snow driving tips. I’m used to driving around on wintry roads, but am new to both automatic and EV cars (other than the test drives).

From what I’ve read, eco mode is a good place to start to dampen down the acceleration of the sports mode and to prevent wheel spin. I’m looking forward to engine regeneration to help with the breaking (I assume it’s like using engine breaking).

Is there anything else that could be useful to know. The roads are kept pretty decent, with snow ploughs working hard, but I have one short steep hill (with a bend halfway up 🤦‍♀️) between my garage and the cleared main road, and I have to say it’s going to be nerve wracking the first time. We all normally do an aeroplane style back up and acceleration up the hill. I’m not sure how the kona will react compared to my diesel engined car!
 

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My prime recommendation would be get some winter or at least all-season tyres on the car. Your location market shows you're in NOrway so I'm sure it will come on winter tyres. That's a good thing!

You need to be fairly sympathetic on the accelerator pedal at the best of times. On snow I'd just let the car pull itself away from standstill. Don't touch the throttle if possible. But as a Norwegian I suspect you have more snow experience than the rest of the forum put together!

And sadly, regenerative braking really needs to be disabled as much as possible because it just locks up the front tyres and the ABS doesn't engage because your foot isn't on the brake. This is a known issue on all EVs - even all wheel drive Tesla's.

Compared to a diesel it'll drive like the diesel was in it's maximum pulling revs - but all the time. It's ludicrous. I've even once managed to spin the wheels at 60mph on the motorway pulling out from behind a slower vehicle while not being careful with the accelerator.

You soon adapt though. It's a really lovely driving experience.
 

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2020 Hyundai Kona Premium SE 64kWh, Ceramic Blue
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The e-Kona accelerates like a bat out of hell - be gentle with the pedal at all times is the only real thing to beware of, and yes the driving mode button on the centre console allows you to scroll through the three modes to eco mode - the mode you have chosen is briefly displayed on the screen to the right of the speedometer for conformation of which mode your press of this button has just changed into. Do not press this button whilst driving until you have driven the car for a while. Some people always drive in eco mode.

Regen is like quite like engine braking, just better, and with three levels it is something to play with over time.

As for hill climbing near your garage, accelerate slowly, don't back up or anything, EVs have instant tourque so backing up won't help. You will notice that the e-Kona climbs hills as effortlessly (and as silently) as it drives on the flat, if you accelerate too hard you will spin the wheels and potentially slide out of control. That solid low slung battery makes the whole car heavier which helps the grip level too.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you. Good advice already. I’m English in Norway and, while I do have experience in the snow, I don’t have EV experience. Very good to know about ABS/ not backing up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ps winter and summer tyres are required by law and very much recommended (even in the UK). It’s not always about the snow, but about the way the rubber behaves at low temperatures.
 

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Ps winter and summer tyres are required by law and very much recommended (even in the UK). It’s not always about the snow, but about the way the rubber behaves at low temperatures.
Indeed. I'm running Michelin CrossClimate+ in the UK. They're good enough for the little bit of snow we get and a country mile better than the stock Nexens in cold temperatures.
 

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I mean driving tips specifically related to the car
From what I’ve read, eco mode is a good place to start to dampen down the acceleration of the sports mode
Just accept the default (normal/comfort?) modes for power and regen, and drive it like any ICE automatic that has a fairly powerful engine - ie. just be careful of using too much throttle. Though with a new car in Norwegian winter you'll probably be doing that anyway because ... well, flying off the first corner - not great.

People love to make a big thing about EVs being 'so different', but although it's a nice quiet experience you really don't have to change your behaviour just to get around town.
Over time you can develop EV specific behaviours but they are entirely optional.

Don't overthink it :)
 

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Otherwise Kona is good in winter, but getting up (steep) snowy/icy roads is not it's strength. I had this problem just a week ago and only getting the car up to speed before attacking the hill helped, so I succeeded on a third try. So you might consider studded tyres if you are driving on snow/ice a lot. I have Continental VikingContact 7 studless winter tyres. And as others have said be gentle with the acceleration pedal - if you get wheelspin on a climb the ESC will kill the speed and it is easy to get stuck.
 

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Snow socks can work well. I always carry a set though I have never needed them. They take up very little space under the boot floor.
When I switched to the Kona I sold the old set on EBAY. The guy who bought them lived in Scotland, had a steep drive and a van. An empty van on snow can be tricky in snow. He reckoned snow-socks were the answer. In fact he bought up several sets from EBAY.
 

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This thread may be interesting. It's in Germany, but the same sort of rather neat super-grippy snow-socks may be available if you like these? ID.3 is rear-wheel drive, not front, but even so there may be something relevant.
Driving on snow in the ID.3
 

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Wow! Never heard of snow socks before, but they do the job. Not sure I need any as I live by the coast and the terrain is flat, Also, we don't get much snow.
 

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The e-Kona accelerates like a bat out of hell - be gentle with the pedal at all times is the only real thing to beware of, and yes the driving mode button on the centre console allows you to scroll through the three modes to eco mode - the mode you have chosen is briefly displayed on the screen to the right of the speedometer for conformation of which mode your press of this button has just changed into. Do not press this button whilst driving until you have driven the car for a while. Some people always drive in eco mode.

Regen is like quite like engine braking, just better, and with three levels it is something to play with over time.

As for hill climbing near your garage, accelerate slowly, don't back up or anything, EVs have instant tourque so backing up won't help. You will notice that the e-Kona climbs hills as effortlessly (and as silently) as it drives on the flat, if you accelerate too hard you will spin the wheels and potentially slide out of control. That solid low slung battery makes the whole car heavier which helps the grip level too.
I had a problem with an extremely steep slope about 300 yards long (a proper mountain road) that was also a bad surface (gravelly). I drove up it steadily at low speed, but got nothing but wheel spin no matter how gentle I was. With the guidance of someone who'd driven up that road lots, we tried a few different things.

I ended up taking a run up, and essentially rallyed my way up at speed, using momentum and the natural bumpiness, and curves in the road giving me occassional better grip which I took advantage of whenever I felt the suspension dip.

Bizarrely, I had also gone into sports mode and turned off traction control. None of that made any sense to me whatsoever - but it all seemed to work. It might have been that Sports mode simply helped me get better speed up quicker, and that the lack of traction control made me just be more tuned in to how I used the accelerator.

Also - with hindsight, I made the mistake of asking everyone to get out (four people) - thinking just as if i was in an old car, that it was struggling with the weight, which was obviously wrong as there is no shortage of torque, and actually the extra weight would have helped with grip.

Better tyres, and more weight would both have helped much more than my rallying driving style!

Also, as Ian said,Re-Gen can be increased or decreased as you drive - in snow on a downward slope, you might well need to lower it using the paddles (right to lower, left to increase) as the maximum level is pretty much the same stopping power as soft braking, which in extreme no-grip conditions on a downwards slope might be too much and could possibly lock the wheels ( assuming there is no ABS equivalent for re-gen... which there might be!)
 

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For anyone in the UK reading this, the answer is “get the train instead”.
 
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The e-Kona accelerates like a bat out of hell - be gentle with the pedal at all times is the only real thing to beware of, and yes the driving mode button on the centre console allows you to scroll through the three modes to eco mode - the mode you have chosen is briefly displayed on the screen to the right of the speedometer for conformation of which mode your press of this button has just changed into. Do not press this button whilst driving until you have driven the car for a while. Some people always drive in eco mode.

Regen is like quite like engine braking, just better, and with three levels it is something to play with over time.

As for hill climbing near your garage, accelerate slowly, don't back up or anything, EVs have instant tourque so backing up won't help. You will notice that the e-Kona climbs hills as effortlessly (and as silently) as it drives on the flat, if you accelerate too hard you will spin the wheels and potentially slide out of control. That solid low slung battery makes the whole car heavier which helps the grip level too.
Backing up will have the traction advantage of more weight over the driven wheels.
 

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Ah yes, I forgot I was on a car forum 😉
 

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Ah yes, I forgot I was on a car forum 😉
All of my comments are based on actual reasons that I've had a train cancelled/delayed when I used to commute by train - basically they don't work when it's snowy (tracks blocked), raining (tracks and tunnels flooded), leafy ("leaves on the line"), or sunny (tracks warped). Which is why I wasn't too bothered about moving to the middle of nowhere with no train station ;)
 

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All of my comments are based on actual reasons that I've had a train cancelled/delayed when I used to commute by train - basically they don't work when it's snowy (tracks blocked), raining (tracks and tunnels flooded), leafy ("leaves on the line"), or sunny (tracks warped). Which is why I wasn't too bothered about moving to the middle of nowhere with no train station ;)
I wonder if Eurostar has ever been cancelled because of fish on the line? :)
 
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