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Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV (2015)
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

Can somebody explain what I need to safely charge my Outlander? Seems there are so many different cables, recommendations, advice etc it's very confusing for somebody like me who is electrically inept and a noob PHEV owner.

Currently, I am charging in the evening with the granny charger in the house so I can keep an eye on it and disconnecting before I go to bed. It's not an ideal setup as I only get about 75% charge and then I warm the car up for the toddler in the morning which drops it the percentage. I need a permanent solution.

I obviously want a safe setup but also need to keep in mind it's just a PHEV so doesn't have the demand a full EV has.

What are fellow Outlander owners' setups?

Also, what is a type 2 charger? I see this being mentioned here and there?

Many thanks
 

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The outlander has a 'type 1' inlet for AC charging.
In Europe and most of the rest of the world, the standard inlet is a 'type 2' inlet. They're functionally pretty much the same unless your vehicle is capable of charging from a three-phase (yours isn't).
These connectors carry the power, an earth connection and some signalling cables so that the charger in your vehicle can agree with the charge point how much current it's allowed to draw, and switches on the power once they've agreed it is all safe.
Technically, the charger is in your vehicle, and the charge point (or granny cable) is just a fancy switch with some safety features.
Public charge points that do AC charging tend to have Type 2 sockets. If you want to use those, you'd need to have your own lead to go from a Type 2 socket to your vehicle's Type 1 inlet. These cost a few hundred pounds.
If you want to charge at home (a grand idea, it'll save you loads in petrol), you'll want a charge point properly connected. What's inside these charge points is approximately the same as what's inside the lump on your granny cable, but rated at a higher current (16 amps or higher, instead of the 10 amps that your granny cable can do).
You can get a charge point with a type 2 socket (bring your own cable - like public charging - see above), or you can get them tethered with a plug appropriate for your vehicle inlet hard-wired, so you don't need to get the cable out of the boot every time.
Regardless of what you choose as a home charge point, you'll need it to be installed on a dedicated circuit by a tame electrician who can do the "Part P" paperwork, and if necessary notify your local distribution network operator. Some electricians specialise in EV charge points, and can supply and fit, or you could buy your own and get the electrician to just fit it. Expect to pay between £150-£250 for the installation of the new circuit with appropriate protective earthing, and anything from £200 to £500 for the actual unit.
If you bought or leased the vehicle new, you may be able to claim a grant from OLEV towards the supply and fitting of a home charge point.
Or you could get by with your granny cable and a regular RCD protected outdoor socket on a dedicated circuit. If it's a decicated circuit from the house's consumer unit it's probably quite safe. If you're plugging in through a window onto an existing 13A socket on a ring main, it's less than ideal as you're more likely to trip a breaker.
see also
 

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Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV (2015)
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Wow Simon that’s fantastic thank you for that in-depth explanation. It seems there’s never a situation where the CHAdeMO port is used? In which situations would it be used if most public chargers are Type 2?

So from quickly googling it seems pod point are a strong contender for dedicated installs. How are these rated in the EV business? Would it be wise to get a tethered Type 1? The reason I ask is although it’s more convenient for me, in the long run maybe not so much.

Also, they seem to offer a 3.6kW one and a 7kW one. Is the larger one pointless or will it actually charge faster?

Thanks again
 

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The CHAdeMO port is used for rapid DC charging. DC charging will bypass the on-board charger on the vehicle, and the rapid charger (which are rather big devices) will talk directly to the battery pack controller on the vehicle. The Outlander's battery pack isn't really designed to take charge particularly fast, but if you find a public rapid charger, then you can use it to charge up the Outlander's (relatively small) battery pack in about 30 minutes, which for a plug-in-hybrid is rather fast, but as EVs go, it's rather slow at about 22kW, most pure EVs on the market today can charge at up to 50kW or higher on DC.

For the Outlander, the fastest it will charge using AC (the type 1 inlet) using the on-board charger is about 3.6kW. You can plug into a more capable charge point, but it won't charge any faster than 3.6kW (that's 16 amps). If you're likely to change to a different vehicle in future, you can get a more capable charge point. Typical for a residential install for full-EVs is a 7kW (32 amp) unit. If you get a tethered connector with a type 1 vehicle connector, then it's normally technically possible for a suitably competant person to swap out the tethered cable for a type 2 tethered cable in the future should you change the vehicle, though it's worth asking the question to whoever is selling you a charge point.
 

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As others have said, despite your PHEV only taking 3.3kW (16A) it is worth investing in a 7kW (32A) charging point as you (or a future owner of your home) is likely to get a BEV.

Although installing a commando socket and using the OHME charging point gets a lot of discussion on here, it isn't particularly aesthetic. IMO it is OK inside a garage, but not great if you want to install outside. It also doesn't save as much money as some claim if you install following OHME advice for complete safety. Where people have cut corners, they are likely to have to remove the socket before selling their home, especially if they don't have a certificate for the circuit.

I have Chargemaster and Podpoint units and both are good. Both suppliers have had unhappy customers on here, but I suspect the majority are satisfied. I am not a fan of the Rolec aesthetics, but some like the choice of finish. For a posh and expensive charging point the Anderson is very nice.

I usually recommend tethered, but in your case a socket probably is better as it is unlikely your next car would be Type 1. Socket units are cheaper too. I recommend a dedicated Type 1 cable (maybe used off here) left plugged in rather than faf of putting in and out of car.

A proper charging point isn't cheap, but in a couple of years house buyers will be see one as a key selling feature!
 

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Just to add to add... If not already consider the Octopus Energy Go Faster tariff. Not on comparison sites, go direct. There are a few options, I'm on five hours from 8:30PM till 1:30AM @ 5.5p kWh, ~14p outwith. That way you can plug in manually for cheap charging. Other tariffs would require timers in the car or a smart charger. And of course, you can run appliances etc at the cheap rate. Cheers!
 

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Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV (2015)
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
What would people recommend for a charge point? I'm tempted by a Pod Point but should I have a tethered Type 1 cable? Then I just need a Type 2 to Type 1 adaptor for public charging? Also, would a 7kW charge point use more electricity? Even though it's drawing max 3.6 kW 16 amps? Essentially, would it cost the same in electricity using a 3.6kW charge point compared to a 7kW?
 

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Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV (2015)
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Or would an RCD outdoor weatherproof plug on a separate circuit suffice?
 

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What would people recommend for a charge point? I'm tempted by a Pod Point but should I have a tethered Type 1 cable?
That's down to your personal preference if you're prefer to not have to get a cable out of the boot (or keep one plugged in at home)
Then I just need a Type 2 to Type 1 adaptor for public charging?
It's a cable, not just an adapter. Type 2 plug on one end, type 1 vehicle onnector on the other.

Also, would a 7kW charge point use more electricity? Even though it's drawing max 3.6 kW 16 amps? Essentially, would it cost the same in electricity using a 3.6kW charge point compared to a 7kW?
No. It wouldn't use more electricity in itself. The only difference between the 7kW and 3.6kW models are that the electromechanical switches inside them (contactors) have chunkier contacts, and the tethered cable will be a bit chunkier to safely carry the higher current should the vehicle need it. They also signal to the vehicle that they're allowed to draw more current.
 

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As I said above, I recommend you get a socket 7kW (32A) charging point and a dedicated cable that you leave plugged into it. Used Type 2 to Type 1 cables can be picked up cheap on eBay and often here. Keep the another Type 2 to Type 1 cable (that came with car) in boot for use at pubic charging points.

Podpoint is a good choice, I am pleased with mine. It doesn't have scheduled charging but they say they will add. We have been waiting a while though...
 
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Hyundai Kona Premium SE in Galactic Grey
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What would people recommend for a charge point? I'm tempted by a Pod Point but should I have a tethered Type 1 cable? Then I just need a Type 2 to Type 1 adaptor for public charging? Also, would a 7kW charge point use more electricity? Even though it's drawing max 3.6 kW 16 amps? Essentially, would it cost the same in electricity using a 3.6kW charge point compared to a 7kW?
So, I had a PHEV, but now have a BEV (kona). When I got the Outlander in 2015 I had a Rolec charger installed and opted for the tethered type 1 cable, but had a separate cable chucked in the boot for public charging places. This was all great and I liked the tethered cable as it meant that I could always access it quickly, no matter the weather, no rummaging about in the cold and dark and wet! Then I changed car - now it's a type 2, but I have a tethered type 1. I only got the new one in September, so still in the midst of the pandemic and not doing too many miles and with a 275 mile range its not needed charged very much. So far I have been using a type 1 to 2 adapter with the home charger and tethered cable and that has worked fine to date, but well aware this may not be a permanent solution.
 
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