Speak EV - Electric Car Forums banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi all,
i've been having a true first world dilemma which car to go to next, and id.3 is among them.

Does anyone here have the heat pump option - is it worth £1260 ? how much more efficient is it ?
 

·
Registered
ID3 life
Joined
·
171 Posts
hi all,
i've been having a true first world dilemma which car to go to next, and id.3 is among them.

Does anyone here have the heat pump option - is it worth £1260 ? how much more efficient is it ?
Personally I think as batteries get bigger a heat pump becomes less important. I certainly don't regret it on my ID3, battery heater seems to be the big consumer.
 

·
Registered
2018 e-Golf
Joined
·
901 Posts
Ive driven the egolf with and without heat pump and it probably only made a few % difference in winter. Prob be the same on the ID's
 

·
Registered
VW eGolf
Joined
·
361 Posts
If you're driving well within the range of the car, it doesn't matter.

If you're driving far enough to need to charge anyway, it doesn't matter.

If you're trying to squeeze out every bit of range to make it to a destination without charging, it might give you the extra few % to achieve that.

I wouldn't bother personally.
 

·
Registered
VW ID.3 1st Edition Manganese Grey - called Heidi Flowerpot
Joined
·
79 Posts
In the mild south-west climate where I am, I'm not often driving in very low temperatures. The extra cost of a heat pump wouldn't have been worth it for me. Others (in Scotland?) will decide differently.
The ID.3 has two heaters, one to warm the battery, the other to warm the cabin. Both work hard to bring the car up to temperature and then tick over keeping the car at the required temperature. If you do very short journeys in very cold weather, the range drops alarmingly because the journey is not long enough to get the car up to temperature. On longer journeys the impact is less because once the battery is warm enough the heater cuts out, the battery will keep warm on its own because of the current passing through it. And the cabin once up to temperature requires less power to keep it that way.
You can look at the power draw when you stop at traffic lights. In summer it'll be a few hundred watts, but at the beginning of a very cold winter journey you might see 5kW or even 7kW. You can also try turning the cabin heating off and see what difference that makes.
The heat pump is supposed to be 30% more efficient, so those winter figures would be that much less. But it's only at the start of the journey. My rationale was that range is only important to me on a long journey, which is also when the range is less affected by the heater's consumption. So I didn't opt for the heat pump.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
the car will be mostly used for 20-30 mile short trips during the week, all year round. I'm in East Anglia so rather mild, too.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top