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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone had any joy convincing work it would be a good idea to install a charge point?

I have approached HR to get the ball rolling but they were worried about Benefits in Kind (BIK) and said it could not be done as the administration would be too much. I said I was happy to pay for the electricity but they still said the administration would be too difficult!

I have checked out the grants available and although £300 is helpful it still leaves the company to pick up a fairly hefty bill which they can not see any benefit for.

My next thought is to look at how this may help their green credentials to see if this could justify the expense, but I'm not sure how to convert this into a benefit for the company so they are willing to install a charge point.

I would be really interest in hearing anyone's experience or advise.

Will
 

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If the car is a company car then the easiest solution is to pay at least cost of electricity so no BIK. It also avoids colleagues complaining that "s/he gets free fuel". I got socket installed at serviced office we had and other tenants complained on that basis. Management company agreed I would write cheque every 3 months to their charity for what I had used, so they could say "I paid".

Maybe your PR/marketing department may help as should be lots of free PR locally and in industry specific magazines to show company is green.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Proddick. The car will be mine so if I get free electric it is defiantly BIK so I am happy to pay. I like the idea of just giving them a check (Not sure if I still have a check book :unsure: ) I guess I could do it on tinternet. Best option would be a charger that is PAYG

I sit next to marketing so I will ask them if they would be interested in the PR.

Cheers
 

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My company said no.
Main reason was that electricity is included in the rent and it would be complicated to get landlord approval.
Other reason was that it was over two grand to install a fast charger.
There are 4 of us with BEVs here, maybe 300 employees. Some PHEVs.

Unless a decision maker has an EV then they wont even begin to understand the situation and they have zero incentive to carry the flag on this project to give you free/cheap fuel.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
My company said no.
Main reason was that electricity is included in the rent and it would be complicated to get landlord approval.
Other reason was that it was over two grand to install a fast charger.
There are 4 of us with BEVs here, maybe 300 employees. Some PHEVs.

Unless a decision maker has an EV then they wont even begin to understand the situation and they have zero incentive to carry the flag on this project to give you free/cheap fuel.
I think you have it in one . It is all about the attitude of the decision maker.
Our Quality Manager is responsible for our green credentials and I think I have him on our side. :)
 

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It is a difficult one to justify on cost grounds, I've just done the research to install one at my office. I'm a director, but still have to justify it to the FD :) Pricing ranged from around £2k from Charged EV (not impressed with the guy who did the survey, and several bad reviews online) to around £3k from Podpoint. Podpoint offered a leasing option, but it was really expensive. Those are before the £300 per socket grant.

Interestingly Chargemaster quoted me £1,800 for the kit, but wouldn't quote for the install as it was too small a job and so they said it would be far too expensive.

Landlord was happy, but it had to be post mount as there's a small walkway between the wall and the parking spaces.

At the moment it's only me with a company EV, and another guy with a personal Zoe. The company does need to charge for use by personal vehicles to avoid BIK, which means going for one of the more sophisticated ones (like Podpoint) where it's all tracked.

The only thing that might help is if you've been claiming mileage for a personal ICE vehicle and could then do a deal to say you won't claim mileage in the EV in return for the company providing a charging point. At the moment there's no advisory fuel rate for EVs. That doesn't mean you can't claim, it just means that to claim you need to record (and potentially provide evidence to HMRC) what the cost is per-mile, rather than using an agreed advisory rate.

If you were doing 5000 miles per year and claiming 25p per mile that's £1,250 per year, so it'll have paid for the charging point in a couple of years.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
It is a difficult one to justify on cost grounds, I've just done the research to install one at my office. I'm a director, but still have to justify it to the FD :) Pricing ranged from around £2k from Charged EV (not impressed with the guy who did the survey, and several bad reviews online) to around £3k from Podpoint. Podpoint offered a leasing option, but it was really expensive. Those are before the £300 per socket grant.

Interestingly Chargemaster quoted me £1,800 for the kit, but wouldn't quote for the install as it was too small a job and so they said it would be far too expensive.

Landlord was happy, but it had to be post mount as there's a small walkway between the wall and the parking spaces.

At the moment it's only me with a company EV, and another guy with a personal Zoe. The company does need to charge for use by personal vehicles to avoid BIK, which means going for one of the more sophisticated ones (like Podpoint) where it's all tracked.

The only thing that might help is if you've been claiming mileage for a personal ICE vehicle and could then do a deal to say you won't claim mileage in the EV in return for the company providing a charging point. At the moment there's no advisory fuel rate for EVs. That doesn't mean you can't claim, it just means that to claim you need to record (and potentially provide evidence to HMRC) what the cost is per-mile, rather than using an agreed advisory rate.

If you were doing 5000 miles per year and claiming 25p per mile that's £1,250 per year, so it'll have paid for the charging point in a couple of years.

Thanks for that TheMewster that is really interesting. We to have a walk way between the building and the car park spaces so we would need a post installation too. It is really helpful to get an idea of costs. We would need at least 2 points as another guy has a Leaf (I have been considering an Ampera)

I rarely do company miles and the last time I did I cracked a rim when I hit a pothole. It was quite expensive to repair and so I will use a pool car next time I have to go out. So claiming fuel is not an option.

I will be looking at the carbon saving by switching from diesel to hybrid to see if there is an environmental angle I can take.

I know our FD will want to know the 'margin', 'pay back',' future price rises' 'Interest rate changes due to Brexit' and all that crystal ball stuff which FDs use to delay or stop projects (cynical???No!):rolleyes: I'm sure you know what I mean.
(Apologies to the good FDs out there)

Cheers
Will
 

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The only thing that might help is if you've been claiming mileage for a personal ICE vehicle and could then do a deal to say you won't claim mileage in the EV in return for the company providing a charging point. At the moment there's no advisory fuel rate for EVs. That doesn't mean you can't claim, it just means that to claim you need to record (and potentially provide evidence to HMRC) what the cost is per-mile, rather than using an agreed advisory rate.
I'm not sure that's right - see:
EIM31240 - Employment Income Manual - HMRC internal manual - GOV.UK
EIM23900 - Employment Income Manual - HMRC internal manual - GOV.UK

My understanding is that you can claim the full AMAP for a car (45p) regardless of the fact that it's an EV (the rates already make no distinction between a gas-guzzler and a super-frugal diesel).

It's also not clear to me that it's essential to have accurate recording of the individual electricity usage. If you have a meter on the supply so that you know what the total usage is, and divide that between the users in some equitable way, that would seem to meet the "pays the cost to the employer" requirement. Certainly if all the users were private cars then it would be clear that there's no tax being lost regardless of which way it's sliced up; in your case with one company car and one private car you might find it harder to make the argument.

This sort of thing would break down in a large organization where the users might argue between themselves, but in a small organization with only a few EV drivers it might pay them to, say, just take the (small) cost and divide it by the number of users (so some end up overpaying and some under), rather than paying the price of having equipment to divide it accurately and all of them paying the exact right amount but all ending up worse off.
 

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I'm not sure that's right - see:
EIM31240 - Employment Income Manual - HMRC internal manual - GOV.UK
EIM23900 - Employment Income Manual - HMRC internal manual - GOV.UK

My understanding is that you can claim the full AMAP for a car (45p) regardless of the fact that it's an EV (the rates already make no distinction between a gas-guzzler and a super-frugal diesel).
Ah, I've just been looking at the company car stuff, rather than personal car used for business. I'm sure I read something a few days ago about HMRC doing some work to simplify things for EVs (an advisory fuel rate would be a good start!).

I suspect that the guidance being so open to interpretation is another barrier to adoption of EVs. Fingers crossed they'll get some clear guidance sorted soon, but I'm not holding my breath...
 

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I just wish my company would let us use the 3 pin sockets. We have some in the underground car park but they actually turned them off at the RCD when they saw EVs charging there. This seems the simplest solution, almost free. If the company wants to reclaim the electricity cost then they could just charge an arbitrary amount to each EV user based on how often it is actually being used. In my case I would only use it when I want to go on to London etc in the evening, maybe once a month. I think this might have been an option for us if we paid our own electric bill but as mentioned in previous post the electric is included in our rent so they use this as a reason to stop us using the 3 pin sockets.
 

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Ah, I've just been looking at the company car stuff, rather than personal car used for business. I'm sure I read something a few days ago about HMRC doing some work to simplify things for EVs (an advisory fuel rate would be a good start!).
Ah yes, the situation of a company-owned car with the driver providing the fuel is more problematic for EVs (with the need to show actual costs rather than there being an approved rate). But on the other hand there's the exemption that anything directly paid by the company is considered not to provide a benefit to the employee. So company-paid charging at work is highly beneficial here.
 

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I just wish my company would let us use the 3 pin sockets. We have some in the underground car park but they actually turned them off at the RCD when they saw EVs charging there. This seems the simplest solution, almost free. If the company wants to reclaim the electricity cost then they could just charge an arbitrary amount to each EV user based on how often it is actually being used. In my case I would only use it when I want to go on to London etc in the evening, maybe once a month. I think this might have been an option for us if we paid our own electric bill but as mentioned in previous post the electric is included in our rent so they use this as a reason to stop us using the 3 pin sockets.
I wonder if in a case like yours doing a deal directly with the landlord would be a way around things? If you get a simple meter put in at the point they are switching off, and the group of EV owners get together to directly pay the landlord for the power, there would be no possibility of a tax charge.

It does beg the question of whether the supply to the 13A sockets is actually suitable for charging however.
 

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But on the other hand there's the exemption that anything directly paid by the company is considered not to provide a benefit to the employee.
Not sure what you mean. When I was full time employee my company paid directly for private health care and that was definitely a BIK...
 

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