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Discussion Starter #1
I am seriously considering getting a full EV car, preferably below £40k, and would like the best range that I can.

The two front runners are not surprisingly the Kia E Niro and the Nissan Leaf e+ with the 62kwh battery.
I have a Note to trade in so the Leaf might have an advantage but I have found that the Leaf battery has no in built cooling system and that there have been battery problems in the past due to overheating. Being that the increased battery power has been fitted into the same size enclosure this seems to be potentially a bigger problem than before to remove the heat.
Can any of you with past experience and greater knowledge please give me any advice on the Leaf being a safe purchase?
Thanks in advance for your thoughts.
 

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The Leaf e+ with its 62 kWh battery suffers from the same underlying flaw as the Leaf 40 - that if repeatedly Rapid charged the cells, particularly those at the rear, get hotter than ideal and will degrade. The Kia (amongst others, but the only one in your comparison) has liquid cooling that avoids this. The question is slightly more complex with the Leaf e+, for example how often will you need to Rapid charge given the size of the pack, will you own the car long enough for what is a theoretical problem to become your problem rather than that of a future owner, and how are you comparing two cars from different sectors in terms of interior size/layout etc?
Other things to consider - the Leaf is getting very long in the tooth now hence the heavy discounting. Based on lease costs the Leaf should cost you less, but if you want an SUV then it is the wrong car for you.
 

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The Leaf e+ with its 62 kWh battery suffers from the same underlying flaw as the Leaf 40 - that if repeatedly Rapid charged the cells, particularly those at the rear, get hotter than ideal and will degrade. The Kia (amongst others, but the only one in your comparison) has liquid cooling that avoids this. The question is slightly more complex with the Leaf e+, for example how often will you need to Rapid charge given the size of the pack, will you own the car long enough for what is a theoretical problem to become your problem rather than that of a future owner, and how are you comparing two cars from different sectors in terms of interior size/layout etc?
Other things to consider - the Leaf is getting very long in the tooth now hence the heavy discounting. Based on lease costs the Leaf should cost you less, but if you want an SUV then it is the wrong car for you.
Pretty much all covered by this reply.

If you see yourself doing journeys where back to back motorway driving and rapidxharging is required, forget the leaf and go with the other better choice.
 

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I am seriously considering getting a full EV car, preferably below £40k, and would like the best range that I can.

The two front runners are not surprisingly the Kia E Niro and the Nissan Leaf e+ with the 62kwh battery.
I have a Note to trade in so the Leaf might have an advantage but I have found that the Leaf battery has no in built cooling system and that there have been battery problems in the past due to overheating. Being that the increased battery power has been fitted into the same size enclosure this seems to be potentially a bigger problem than before to remove the heat.
Can any of you with past experience and greater knowledge please give me any advice on the Leaf being a safe purchase?
Thanks in advance for your thoughts.
Quite right to go for the best range you can afford, winter temperatures kill battery range, so more is better. But bear in mind if you can manage with less range, it reduces the weight of the vehicle and increase efficiency. The NISSAN Leaf 40KWh weighs 150 Kgs less than the 62KWh And 10% more efficient as a result.

The Question you need to ask yourself is: Will I be regularly making 300 mile or more trips in a day?
If the answer is yes then go for an EV that has active battery cooling such as the excellent, efficient KIA NIRO.

If the answer is no, then an EV with no battery cooling such as the excellent Leaf 62KWh will be very capable. The battery in the 62KWh has a different battery chemistry and internal layout which means that it heats up at half the rate of the 40KWh. This means it can be driven at 70 mph for 160 miles and a rapid charge of say 50 minutes can add 100 miles range, another rapid would then over heat the battery, so would not be advised on a regular basis.

Also battery’s with no cooling are less complicated therefore less to go wrong and less maintenance.

Historically battery’s with no cooling suffer slightly more battery degradation than those with cooling but it really depends on how often excessive heat is suffered, example battery’s in hot climates suffer badly, but not really an issue in the UK.

I would say that the KIA is probably the better buy as it is more modern and efficient, the problem is the year long waiting list to get one, or pay a premium inflated price.

The Leaf 62KWh is capable, reliable and very well bolted together, it is available now and can be had at discount prices.

I had a 40KWh Leaf for 2 years, an excellent vehicle but the battery overheated on 300 mile journey’s, so had to draft lorries most of the time. Now have a Leaf 62KWh which is a good 70 mph motorway vehicle but you do feel the extra weight.

That said I only do such trips 6 times a year so it’s a balance to justify the extra financial out lay.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks dk6780.freddym, Ian McVey and Gosport Dave.
Those are comprehensive and reasoned replies. Thanks for taking the time and trouble.
I should say that my wife has had two knee replacements which have not been the miracle cure that might have been anticipated and this means that getting into a higher set car is a problem and we cannot sort this question until we can visit showrooms.
I will try and keep my Jaguar XF Sportbrake for our occasional long trips, so I don't think too many rapid charges will be a problem.
Thanks again for the thoughts.
 

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Thanks dk6780.freddym, Ian McVey and Gosport Dave.
Those are comprehensive and reasoned replies. Thanks for taking the time and trouble.
I should say that my wife has had two knee replacements which have not been the miracle cure that might have been anticipated and this means that getting into a higher set car is a problem and we cannot sort this question until we can visit showrooms.
I will try and keep my Jaguar XF Sportbrake for our occasional long trips, so I don't think too many rapid charges will be a problem.
Thanks again for the thoughts.
Hi OP, really hope you find a car that your wife can easily enter and exit and is comfortable. That sounds like Number One criteria.
 

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I will try and keep my Jaguar XF Sportbrake for our occasional long trips, so I don't think too many rapid charges will be a problem.
So why is long range important? Also have you physically looked at Niro - the boot is quite small, no bigger than Zoe IIRC.
 

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Being that the increased battery power has been fitted into the same size enclosure this seems to be potentially a bigger problem than before to remove the heat.
Point of fact - the case of the 62kWh LEAF battery is bigger than before, but the point is the same as the surface area hasn't increased in line with the increase in capacity.
 

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So why is long range important? Also have you physically looked at Niro - the boot is quite small, no bigger than Zoe IIRC.
Zoe is 338 litres, e-Niro is 451 litres. e-Niro boot is larger than the hybrid or plugin hybrid, as their batteries are in the boot rather than under the cabin.
 

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I am seriously considering getting a full EV car, preferably below £40k, and would like the best range that I can.


Car / battery / WLTP range / MSRP after PICG



MG eZS 44.5kWh liquid cooled 163 miles £25,495

Hyundai Ioniq EV 38.3kWh 193 miles £30,950

BMW i3 120Ah 42.2kWh refrigerant cooled 193 miles £38,555 often big discounts on PCP or PCH

Peugeot e208 50kWh liquid cooled 217 Miles £28,715 - £32,965

Nissan LEAF e+ 64kWh passive cooled 239 miles £33,295 there may be discounts

Renault Zoe 52kWh(usable) 245 miles £26,195 - £29,695 there may be discounts.

Tesla Model 3 SR+ ??kWh liquid cooled 254 miles £40,490



I've owned or leased LEAF 24, 30 and i3s 94Ah.

LEAF 30 is perhaps the optimum size for the passivly cooled battery. It doesn't suffer from rapid charge heating issues nearly as much as any of the other sizes. Several reviewers mentioned the e+ weight impacting handling. On the other hand the e+ has enough range that a single rapid charge will cover most journies.


BMW have the best cooling system. Interior feels premium compared to LEAF or Zoe. MSRP is absurd but there are often very good discounts. I like my i3 but I'll be the first to say it is a city car at heart. Car is very quirkey. It certainaly isn't for someone wanting an SUV or crossover.

i3 and M3 are are 100% clean sheet pure EV designs.


Our next EV will be a M3 if we can afford it. If we end up moving back to America (Montana) I'll get a Cybertruck.
 

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Zoe is 338 litres, e-Niro is 451 litres. e-Niro boot is larger than the hybrid or plugin hybrid, as their batteries are in the boot rather than under the cabin.
Interesting, I think it was the PHEV version I had seen a while ago and it didn't look that big.
 

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FTFY. To be fair, the LEAF e+ is a limited update on a very old design.
LEAF EV platform is derrived from Nissan-Renault alliance B and B0 platforms although Nissan don't talk about it. You can see it in the way the car is layed out like an petrol car.

Renault Zoe is also on the B platform. Under the skin it is more or less it is a Clio with the suspension parts out of a Megane

Renault ZOE is based on the “B” platform already used by around twenty Alliance models
 
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