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Kia E-Niro 2021 4+
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Seen on a thread for Zoes someone mentioned that cruise control isn’t the most efficient way to drive on motorway/fast A roads, because it’s harder to control power use.
How does this apply to a Niro?
I think I’d been taught with ICE cars that a steady speed without lots of accel/decel was most efficient and assumed this applied to all forms of power. Or maybe that was a myth to start with?!
 

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Pretty sure "pulse & glide" is the most efficient method even in ICE vehicles but who can be bothered to do that? Also it's more dangerous when other vehicles are on the road.

Just use cruise control and let the car decide how much power it needs. If you're concerned about range just reduce the speed during uphill sections, or overall.
 

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Pretty sure "pulse & glide" is the most efficient method even in ICE vehicles but who can be bothered to do that? Also it's more dangerous when other vehicles are on the road.

Just use cruise control and let the car decide how much power it needs. If you're concerned about range just reduce the speed during uphill sections, or overall.
Worth noting that pulse and glide works for ICE because engines are at their most efficient at a particular narrow range of revs.
So the pulse is to put the engine into that range and then glide is for no fuel idle.
For electric motors, you want minimal power to avoid heat losses from higher currents (cables/motor/battery).
So just use a steady light foot.

Or just not bother and use SCC @e-nir0 says :)
 

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Worth noting that pulse and glide works for ICE because engines are at their most efficient at a particular narrow range of revs.
So the pulse is to put the engine into that range and then glide is for no fuel idle.
For electric motors, you want minimal power to avoid heat losses from higher currents (cables/motor/battery).
So just use a steady light foot.

Or just not bother and use SCC @e-nir0 says :)
Makes sense.
 

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It depends how anxious you are to increase the range. The adaptive cruise control on the e-Niro is very good - but it will increase the power considerably when going uphill. If range is critical you will probably achieve more efficiency if you turn off the cruise control and slow down on the uphill stretches. However, the e-Niro usually has plenty of range so may not be worth bothering.
 

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Kia e-Niro 4 MY20, Zoe Z.E.50 GT Line
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On the flat there nothing in it. Cruise control maintains speed up hills, which you might not choose to do yourself. It also holds your speed back going downhill where, depending on your speed, you might let the car gain speed and that’s likely to be more efficient than regen holding you back.

however, I’ve always found driving like that to be pretty exhausting. I too use SCC a lot.
 

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VW e-Up! 2020
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Dropping the speed up hills only gains anything if motor efficiency is significantly lower at higher power. Is it in a typical EV, which can sustain speed uphill without even coming close to flooring it? I don't think so.

The other factor is of course that dropping the speed anywhere, including uphill, lowers the air resistance. But that is better done by driving 1 or 2 km/h slower on the whole journey rather than dropping it more significantly just up hills (to compare strategies resulting in the same total journey time).
 

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Kia E-niro 4+
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I also use SCC for about 80% of my driving - and manage 4+m/kWh with ease. Always with regen set to zero, then if I remember, I knock SCC off when going downhill, allow the car to coast until back at SCC speed.. where I reinitiate it…. If I remember! If not at least I get some regen, so it’s not all los

The E-Niro actually has - hands-down - the best CC system in all my cars to date.

My wife and I discuss CC/Regen quite often - but we always just agree that what ever is the most comfortable and easiest drive. This car seems to almost magically hit it’s range so far, so we’re not fussed about eeking out additional miles from a charge.
 

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Dropping the speed up hills only gains anything if motor efficiency is significantly lower at higher power. Is it in a typical EV, which can sustain speed uphill without even coming close to flooring it? I don't think so.

The other factor is of course that dropping the speed anywhere, including uphill, lowers the air resistance. But that is better done by driving 1 or 2 km/h slower on the whole journey rather than dropping it more significantly just up hills (to compare strategies resulting in the same total journey time).
Agreed. Romping up a hill in fine style you're obviously going to have the usual penalty of speed, and the electrical losses will be a tad higher if the motor is working very hard, but you're going to have to put the same potential energy in, fast or slow. However, you then have that kWh credit to use on the way down the other side -- especially at motorway speeds, when you'll not be regenerating much, just spending less on driving forward, courtesy of gravity.
 
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