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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

Whilst attracted by the idea of the intrinsically lower maintenance of an EV due to the fewer moving parts, i have just been hit by the flip side - when a part goes, it is a big ticket item. Happy with my 2013 ZOE for 4 years, an despite sticking to the service schedule it started to have 'Impossible to charge' problems. I dropped £570 with the dealer to diagnose the issue and 3 weeks later was told it was on the 400V system, would cost a potential additional £2000 to isolate and if it was the traction motor, just the part would add £5500 to that. So basically twice the price of the residual value.

I appealed to Renault Customer Services (as advised by the dealer) and after a merry-go-round of asking what I wanted (a working car!) they suggested I get a new one and offered a £500 voucher towards a new £19k car. I kind of feel, as an early adopter, that I have been beta tested on, that Renault should show more interest in getting to the bottom of the issue (to avoid recurrence). It all fell on deaf ears and I got an increasingly repetitive script parroted back to me. I feel I have no choice but to junk the car and walk away (permanently from Renault).

Customer services then refused to help me sort out terminating the battery lease and disposal. The dealer has offered to help but thought removing of the battery before scrappage could itself be costly. I ma struggling with the mentality of Renault here. Scrapping a car after less than 6 years with only 30k on the clock sees the antithesis of the 'green motoring' that I thought they wanted the ZOE to represent. As an engineer, if I had a product suddenly failing in such a costly fashion I'd want to get to the bottom of it, for my internal quality management, if not for the customer.

It is a sad end as I liked the car itself.

Does anyone have any suggestions before the car gets taken away (and I end up with the bill)?

Tom
 

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˙ǝןƃƃnɹʇs ןןıɥuʍop ɐ sı ǝɟı˥
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160 Posts
You might have recourse under what used to be The Sale of Goods Act 1979 which has now been replaced by the Consumer Rights Act 2015.
Basically, if it could be shown that the fault - be it in manufacturing or design - was present when the car was produced then you could have a claim for up to 6 years after manufacture.
Here is more info:
Guarantees: repairs, replacements, refunds



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Take it to the press and social media. It's hardly environmentally friendly to scrap such a young car. The battery lease removal costs may go against the E.U. end of life vehicle directive so that's worth investigating.

These failures with zoes aren't that unusual unfortunately.
 

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Speak, Eevee!
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Yeah honestly for that scale of loss, it's probably worth taking them to court, going to the press etc if all reasonable avenues have been tried
 

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A car should last for more than 6 years, especially as you have maintained it in line with the manufacturers guidelines.

Therefore I’d say it’s not fit for purpose and any “warranty period” is irrelevant

Kick off

Nothing to lose

Speak to your local CAB first

JJ
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hi Folks,
Firstly, thanks for the sympathy - its not just me thinks this is too young to be scrapped and environmentally counter productive!
I have spoken to my car insurance legal helpline who agree with Philip Pronto that this is under the 1979 Sale of Goods Act. Responsibility is on the retailer (dealer, not Renault directly) and my first step is to ask for their help. If they refuse then I need an expert statement to say that a well maintained EV should last more than 6 years / 30K. With that report my car insurance legal cover may appoint a solicitors to take on negotiations with the Renault dealer.
I should reasonably expext a partial refund i.e. the current residual value + my costs for diagnosis.

Here is the catch though, my servicing dealer probably won't count as an expert. So does anyone know an EV expert who could write an expert witness report that would stand up in court (if necessary)?

Thanks again, I'll keep you posted on developments this end...

Tom
 
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