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Leo once had a number of fuel-guzzling vehicles, including a Land Rover. But when he bought a 30kWh Nissan Leaf three years ago – in a conscious effort to improve his energy efficiency – he was surprised by how fun it was to drive.

“I enjoyed driving the electric car so much, not to mention the dramatic reduction in running costs. I got rid of the Land Rover and Alfa Romeo, neither of which had moved out of the garage in a year, followed by the motorcycle a year ago.”

When Leo bought the updated 40kWh Nissan Leaf two years later, he decided to make the car work for him as more than just a way to get around. Through V2G (vehicle-to-grid) technology, Leo now makes money from his car when it’s sitting in the garage.

“I had my V2G charger installed in the garage. As well as a £75 credit for initial sign-up, I get 30p for every kWh I export to the grid, which is a profit of more than 10p for every kWh.”

Leo’s taking part in the V2G trial – a collaboration between OVO Energy, Nissan and 2 other companies. With the trial, Nissan Leaf owners can export energy stored in their vehicle back to the national grid – and get paid for it, too. Current energy plans pay 26p/kWh (solar) and 30p/kWh (non-solar) for people’s energy exports. So it’s a good deal for the grid, and for V2G trial participants like Leo.

“The improvements to household efficiency reduced my running costs by a third. However, I was continuing to pay my old rates. This meant that I was overpaying, so I now have a tidy sum in credit – which OVO Energy pays me interest on.(1) Also, at the end of the trial, I can pay just 1p to keep the £5,000 charger.”

More cash in your pocket

Earning money through your car might sound too good to be true, but Leo’s been pleasantly surprised about the financial perks of V2G.

“The credit for the energy you export is paid a month in arrears. Last month, the credit exceeded the amount I spent in gas and electric for the house and car – this meant I received a credit of £28. The credits and interest will leave my payments over a year in advance, so my gas, electricity and fuel bills for the car will all be free.”

Want to know how much you could save by taking part in our V2G trial? Our team can take you through our savings calculator to help you estimate how much you could save based on your current energy use. If you want to learn more about the trial and how we calculate your savings, give us a call on 0330 102 7423 or email [email protected].

V2G couldn’t be simpler

Using your new vehicle and V2G charger is a doddle. Take it from Leo.

“When I’m not using my car, it’s in the garage and plugged into the grid. This means electricity can flow both ways – topping up when there’s lots of electricity and exporting to the grid when there’s not.”

Your V2G charger gives you total control. You can personalise how much energy you want to export, and how much energy you want to keep in your battery. It’s easy to set up and change anytime with the Kaluza web app. Leo uses the app to set when he needs to have 100% battery charge available.

“The charger software calculates how long it will take to charge to 100%, and stops exporting at this point.”

Leo’s also discovered a hidden benefit of charging the electric vehicle.

“The heat in the battery not only gives me a warm and toasty garage to work in throughout the year, but also ensures the car is both warmer in winter and at the optimum temperature for efficiency. My consumption has improved from 3.5 miles per kWh to 4.5 miles per kWh.”

One big concern of V2G critics is the potential impact of cycling the battery charge level on such a regular basis. However, Warwick University research suggests it actually has a positive effect. Leo’s been keeping close tabs on his car battery health.

“I’ve monitored the battery daily (initially – I soon got sick of it!) and compared with previous running, the battery appears to be degrading at a slower pace. The constant charging and discharging seems to be good for the battery’s health.”

Just plug in

Although V2G is a planet-saving technical marvel, your part is simple. Just plug in.

“There’s nothing else to do other than plug the car in every time you get in and unplug it when you go out. Everything else is done for you.”

If you’re a Nissan Leaf owner and interested in joining our V2G trial, head to ovoenergy.com/v2g and we’ll set you up. It’s your chance to join Leo and over one million OVO members on their journey to zero carbon – simply by charging your car.

(1) Interest Rewards are paid on credit balances of customers paying by monthly Direct Debit. It is calculated at 3% in your first year, 4% in your second year and 5% in your third year (and every year thereafter) if you pay by Direct Debit. Interest Rewards are paid monthly based on the number of days you’re in credit and the amount left in your account after you’ve paid your bill. Full terms apply.
 

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Im no battery technical expert but charging and discharging at 6kw via V2G has to be less stressful on the battery than normal driving where you can pull 80kw over short periods of time or rapid charging putting back 50kw. The V2G will all take place within the 20-80% range, there not going to pull all the power from you battery down to 0% and leave it there.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hi @husoi - in addition to the data from the Warwick University study, the following comments were made in the Public OVO V2G Facebook Group. We're very excited to see the long term data, whilst Nissan's decision to honour battery warranty in the 30kWh+ variants is another vote of confidence in the technology.

Trialist 1:

I recently put on here that I found the V2G might have been lowering my SOH but NOW it has gone from 94.21 to 94.95, just a few points off 95%. So I have to COMPLETELY retract what I said. Currently eating humble Pie.
Trialist 2:
(Their Leaf Spy data can be seen in the OVO V2G Facebook Group)

Wow astonished I would say, it’s early days but I don’t really follow my leaf spy as it can fluctuate usually +\- 1%, however, to combat this I only look on the first of every month, and comparing previous results since starting the V2G trail my SOH has increased, and well take a look at this, I do some mileage in the car these days, I didn’t in the past, but a baby now means I am travelling all over dropping her off at nursery picking her up from grand parents and going for days out, I mainly use V2G as the main form of charging however I do use public charging, This is the best SOH I have seen on leaf spy this year, so are the claim that V2G can help you battery? Who knows but this certainly looks positive....
Trialist 3:
(Their Leaf Spy data can be seen in the OVO V2G Facebook Group)

...my 30kw (66 plate) which is the one that gets plugged in to V2G every day. Showing a rise in SOH from 1st December to 1st January. Interesting that my 24kw (which only gets on the V2G once 30kw is fully discharged, and usually gets recharged on a granny) has seen a 1.5% drop in the same period, subject to the same environmental changes etc.
 

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Also dont forget, you have an 8yr warranty on 40/40/62kwh leaf battery packs. This is limited to 100,000miles but i would expect that no leaf ever does more than 1 full charge/discharge cycle in a day on V2G so a lot less than some taxi vehicles have.

And I've never seen a warranty claim where discharge/charge cycles have mattered, even if a pack did wear/fall below the threshold, then it would still be an upheld claim.
 

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Hi @OVO Energy
Thank you for the information. It is interesting that SoH improves with frequent "movement" of energy.
Will have to investigate this further because I use the car every day making a min of 100 miles Mon-Fri and not unusual to have a weekend day trip for a full day going for 200 to 400 miles journeys.
This because I now have a Leaf 62 e+ LE so I can travel further away ;)
My concern will be that periods of V2G will be limited and I will need a minimum of 55% at 6:30 am
 

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Hi @OVO Energy
Thank you for the information. It is interesting that SoH improves with frequent "movement" of energy.
Will have to investigate this further because I use the car every day making a min of 100 miles Mon-Fri and not unusual to have a weekend day trip for a full day going for 200 to 400 miles journeys.
This because I now have a Leaf 62 e+ LE so I can travel further away ;)
My concern will be that periods of V2G will be limited and I will need a minimum of 55% at 6:30 am
Not that I have any relationship with OVO, but surely if OVO leave you with say 80% at 6:30 then you'd finish the day with 25% extra left above that currently that OVO could take back then. And that assumes that they need it at that point - if not they could charge you further until taking it later.
 

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Hi @OVO Energy
Thank you for the information. It is interesting that SoH improves with frequent "movement" of energy.
Will have to investigate this further because I use the car every day making a min of 100 miles Mon-Fri and not unusual to have a weekend day trip for a full day going for 200 to 400 miles journeys.
This because I now have a Leaf 62 e+ LE so I can travel further away ;)
My concern will be that periods of V2G will be limited and I will need a minimum of 55% at 6:30 am
The setup means that generally the battery only drains upto about 9-10pm and then after that can start filling up again.
 

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The setup means that generally the battery only drains upto about 9-10pm and then after that can start filling up again.
that could work.
The downside is the ludicrous standing charge for both gas and electric. 28p a day???
Using last year usage you would be a lot (and I mean A LOT) more expensive than my current supplier
 

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The punchline should have been that Leo has bought himself another EV to drive around in while his Leaf is in the garage plugged in 24/7. And that he's maxed-out his monthly payments to benefit from the credit interest.
Yes, it does sound too good to be true! Maybe after the trial period there'll be more government money on the way to keep it going.
 

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that could work.
The downside is the ludicrous standing charge for both gas and electric. 28p a day???
Using last year usage you would be a lot (and I mean A LOT) more expensive than my current supplier
Standing charge is irrelevant if you basically are charging your car for free though is it not?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Not that I have any relationship with OVO, but surely if OVO leave you with say 80% at 6:30 then you'd finish the day with 25% extra left above that currently that OVO could take back then. And that assumes that they need it at that point - if not they could charge you further until taking it later.
Minimum and maximum charge levels are due to be introduced shortly, whilst the Kaluza app allows you to schedule - if you need 80% at 6.30 then set it via the App and the V2G Unit will cease the exports to the grid, and charge to meet your requirement.

@OVO Energy
Any news on LEAF24s being able to sign up?
The 24kWh LEAF is accepted once out of warranty,and a number of trialists have waived the last remaining months of their warranty in order to join the trial.

The installation of the V2G Unit requires approval from your DNO, and this can lead to longer installation times. If your LEAF is coming up to the end of the warranty in the next 3-4 months then you may want to consider starting the process shortly.
 

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Leo once had a number of fuel-guzzling vehicles, including a Land Rover. But when he bought a 30kWh Nissan Leaf three years ago – in a conscious effort to improve his energy efficiency – he was surprised by how fun it was to drive.

“I enjoyed driving the electric car so much, not to mention the dramatic reduction in running costs. I got rid of the Land Rover and Alfa Romeo, neither of which had moved out of the garage in a year, followed by the motorcycle a year ago.”

When Leo bought the updated 40kWh Nissan Leaf two years later, he decided to make the car work for him as more than just a way to get around. Through V2G (vehicle-to-grid) technology, Leo now makes money from his car when it’s sitting in the garage.

“I had my V2G charger installed in the garage. As well as a £75 credit for initial sign-up, I get 30p for every kWh I export to the grid, which is a profit of more than 10p for every kWh.”

Leo’s taking part in the V2G trial – a collaboration between OVO Energy, Nissan and 2 other companies. With the trial, Nissan Leaf owners can export energy stored in their vehicle back to the national grid – and get paid for it, too. Current energy plans pay 26p/kWh (solar) and 30p/kWh (non-solar) for people’s energy exports. So it’s a good deal for the grid, and for V2G trial participants like Leo.

“The improvements to household efficiency reduced my running costs by a third. However, I was continuing to pay my old rates. This meant that I was overpaying, so I now have a tidy sum in credit – which OVO Energy pays me interest on.(1) Also, at the end of the trial, I can pay just 1p to keep the £5,000 charger.”

More cash in your pocket

Earning money through your car might sound too good to be true, but Leo’s been pleasantly surprised about the financial perks of V2G.

“The credit for the energy you export is paid a month in arrears. Last month, the credit exceeded the amount I spent in gas and electric for the house and car – this meant I received a credit of £28. The credits and interest will leave my payments over a year in advance, so my gas, electricity and fuel bills for the car will all be free.”

Want to know how much you could save by taking part in our V2G trial? Our team can take you through our savings calculator to help you estimate how much you could save based on your current energy use. If you want to learn more about the trial and how we calculate your savings, give us a call on 0330 102 7423 or email [email protected].

V2G couldn’t be simpler

Using your new vehicle and V2G charger is a doddle. Take it from Leo.

“When I’m not using my car, it’s in the garage and plugged into the grid. This means electricity can flow both ways – topping up when there’s lots of electricity and exporting to the grid when there’s not.”

Your V2G charger gives you total control. You can personalise how much energy you want to export, and how much energy you want to keep in your battery. It’s easy to set up and change anytime with the Kaluza web app. Leo uses the app to set when he needs to have 100% battery charge available.

“The charger software calculates how long it will take to charge to 100%, and stops exporting at this point.”

Leo’s also discovered a hidden benefit of charging the electric vehicle.

“The heat in the battery not only gives me a warm and toasty garage to work in throughout the year, but also ensures the car is both warmer in winter and at the optimum temperature for efficiency. My consumption has improved from 3.5 miles per kWh to 4.5 miles per kWh.”

One big concern of V2G critics is the potential impact of cycling the battery charge level on such a regular basis. However, Warwick University research suggests it actually has a positive effect. Leo’s been keeping close tabs on his car battery health.

“I’ve monitored the battery daily (initially – I soon got sick of it!) and compared with previous running, the battery appears to be degrading at a slower pace. The constant charging and discharging seems to be good for the battery’s health.”

Just plug in

Although V2G is a planet-saving technical marvel, your part is simple. Just plug in.

“There’s nothing else to do other than plug the car in every time you get in and unplug it when you go out. Everything else is done for you.”

If you’re a Nissan Leaf owner and interested in joining our V2G trial, head to ovoenergy.com/v2g and we’ll set you up. It’s your chance to join Leo and over one million OVO members on their journey to zero carbon – simply by charging your car.

(1) Interest Rewards are paid on credit balances of customers paying by monthly Direct Debit. It is calculated at 3% in your first year, 4% in your second year and 5% in your third year (and every year thereafter) if you pay by Direct Debit. Interest Rewards are paid monthly based on the number of days you’re in credit and the amount left in your account after you’ve paid your bill. Full terms apply.
Could you please state "Leo's" usage profile?

It is all very nice earning at 30p/kWh, but when does he do this? Is he retired and does this in the middle of the day, how many hours does he charge for and how many discharge for.

Could we see a graph of Leo's usage, where does he live, a bar table showing each hour of a typical day and how much is being charged and how much discharged?

Then also the cost of those events, /kWh, and the standing charges.

Simply saying what is in that text did does not remotely quantify the scale of monetary benefit. Consumers should know what the up-costs and subsequent benefits are, else it is just confusion-marketing, and we don't want that, do we?
 

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Could you please state "Leo's" usage profile?

It is all very nice earning at 30p/kWh, but when does he do this? Is he retired and does this in the middle of the day, how many hours does he charge for and how many discharge for.

Could we see a graph of Leo's usage, where does he live, a bar table showing each hour of a typical day and how much is being charged and how much discharged?

Then also the cost of those events, /kWh, and the standing charges.

Simply saying what is in that text did does not remotely quantify the scale of monetary benefit. Consumers should know what the up-costs and subsequent benefits are, else it is just confusion-marketing, and we don't want that, do we?
I think you'll find there is another thread which covers all this as a usage example from Mike @ Indra showing it all.
Every user is different so basing anything off another users info is a bit pointless.
 

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I think you'll find there is another thread which covers all this as a usage example from Mike @ Indra showing it all.
Every user is different so basing anything off another users info is a bit pointless.
I did not see that sort of detail in his posts. Maybe I missed it?

I am interested in seeing;
  • the best possible case
  • the 'edge' case (on balance)
  • the worst case
By knowing where you are on that spectrum of possibilities you know whether there is any chance of getting benefit here.

I mean, simple and straightforward, do I get 30p/kWh any time of the day or night and can I export it whenever I want, and for how many years is this guaranteed? What is the rate of electricity purchase? What is the standing charge?

Mike would not know where "Leo" lives, so how could he give figures for Leo's region?

The fact is that the facts just aren't enough to have even the beginning of a clue if the arrangement helps anyone.
 

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Standing charge is irrelevant if you basically are charging your car for free though is it not?
How are you charging 'for free' and how much really is that? My bill is mostly domestic usage, so if I get car charging for free but the rest of the costs double, then it's clearly going to be a shit deal.
 

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Are there really no numbers? Can someone PLEASE just show me how much this thing costs?

I've been to the website and this information just isn't there.

Should I report to OFGEM? I think it is required, isn't it?
 

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Are there really no numbers? Can someone PLEASE just show me how much this thing costs?

I've been to the website and this information just isn't there.

Should I report to OFGEM? I think it is required, isn't it?
I created this little spreadsheet to make my comparison
Feel free to download and adjust to suit
 
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