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Discussion Starter #1
Evening chaps, spot of bother... my zoe text me to let me know that the charge has unexpectically stopped. When i went out to check the car alerted me to check the charge plug at the front.. when i touched it the plug was boiling hot, now i know they get warm but it was roasting hot! Me being me i opened to plug to find the the neutral wire connection (pictured om the right) has a crack / fracture on the outside of the pin. The inside looked a bit more shaded than the others also.

Please see pics, any electrically minded person could be of great help!

Thanks very much :)
 

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Corsa-e Elite Nav 70 reg
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Someone with a suitable soldering iron (and skills) could swap the Neutral pin for one of the unused Lives. If you're anywhere near Fleet in Hampshire, I could do it for you. The wires are originally crimped into the pin, but I doubt if you'll find someone with a suitable crimp tool, so solder is the next best alternative.
 

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I'm not crazy, the attack has begun.
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These are hydraulic crimp only.

I don't understand why folks think you can safely solder a 32A core to a receptacle. It's not safe for a host of reasons.

The technical term for this lead is 'fooked'. It was never of satisfactory quality if it can split like this. A latent fault waiting to fail. Return to maker. It is a safety issue.

What make of connector is it? Are Renault still using those awful quality FCI products?

Also to note, you need to check the plating on the socket pin on your car. Looking at the way the internal part has become damaged, it may have damaged your car socket. If so, require a car socket replacement from the lead manufacturers.If you don't where the plating is damaged, over time the pin will degrade until it needs replacing.

TBH, this has't happened over night. People.... I know we are lazy beings but take a good look into your lead receptacles as often as you can. Who knows what sort of problems you might spot in there, before you connect it to your lovely car and wreck it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the reply and cheers for the offer Andy! Sadly i live in south wales but really nice to offer!. It would appear that you can solder the wire out and replace it with a spare pin which i reacon I can do. One thing on my mind however is why would this of happened in the first place?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
These are hydraulic crimp only.

I don't understand why folks think you can safely solder a 32A core to a receptacle. It's not safe for a host of reasons.

The technical term for this lead is 'fooked'. It was never of satisfactory quality if it can split like this. A latent fault waiting to fail. Return to maker. It is a safety issue.

What make of connector is it? Are Renault still using those awful quality FCI products?
Cheers for the opinion Donald, this is the chargemaster plug. Only problem i have is about 18 months ago i extended the box further down my garden which has voided the warrenty sticker at the bottom :(
 

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Co-author of CanZE. Q210 nov 2013
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Those pins have quite a heat capacity and on top of that quite some surface area. I doubt anything but a massive soldering iron could do it.

I did a few and I used big pipe pliers to crimp the end of the pin as best as I could and then soldered it using a plumber gas torch on a low setting heating the pin, then remove the flame and let the residual heat melt and wick up the solder.

As to why? Either the shit happens or lousy quality plug. I reckon a bit of both. It's NOT good. Glad the car decided to quit. I am not aware of a temperature sensor, so maybe it was even voltage drop because of this bad contact. Brrrrr.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Cheers for the help and advise mate, when i swap the pins ill do a guide so hopefully it may help someone else one day :).


Those pins have quite a heat capacity and on top of that quite some surface area. I doubt anything but a massive soldering iron could do it.

I did a few and I used big pipe pliers to crimp the end of the pin as best as I could and then soldered it using a plumber gas torch on a low setting heating the pin, then remove the flame and let the residual heat melt and wick up the solder.

As to why? Either the shit happens or lousy quality plug. I reckon a bit of both. It's NOT good. Glad the car decided to quit. I am not aware of a temperature sensor, so maybe it was even voltage drop because of this bad contact. Brrrrr.
 

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I'd echo Donald, please don't try soldering a new pin on, it must be crimped.

Physically moving the unit shouldn't have affected the pins in the socket, I think you should contact chargemaster to tell them what's happened. You haven't had a fire, and that's good, but if they have a faulty batch of pins someone else might, with a worst case scenario that it kills someone. Please tell them!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hi Edd thanks for your advise also, Looking at the bottom of the pins they look just soldered in however I may be wrong as they are wrapped in heatshrink. I will investigate further tonight.
 

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Co-author of CanZE. Q210 nov 2013
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Soldering is second best to proper crimping, but it's very acceptable. You need very specific tools for proper crimping these pins, them being pushed in from 4 or 6 sides at the same time. Just crimping with plyers is a very, very bad idea and I did it only to stabilize the wire and have less space to fill up with solder, not to kid myself into thinking it would be a good contact.

Having said that, a bad soldering job does not compensate a bad crimping job. 32 amps is a lot and just one volt voltage drop (a lousy 30 milliohms!) on a bad connection generates 32 watt there. So do take it seriously and inspect your work. (y)
 

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I'm not crazy, the attack has begun.
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Soldering is second best to proper crimping, but it's very acceptable. You need very specific tools for proper crimping these pins, them being pushed in from 4 or 6 sides at the same time. Just crimping with plyers is a very, very bad idea and I did it only to stabilize the wire and have less space to fill up with solder, not to kid myself into thinking it would be a good contact.

Having said that, a bad soldering job does not compensate a bad crimping job. 32 amps is a lot and just one volt voltage drop (a lousy 30 milliohms!) on a bad connection generates 32 watt there. So do take it seriously and inspect your work. (y)
TBH, suggesting solder is risking fire damage, and voiding your house insurance when it eventually burns down.

I hate being the old grump that 'always has to be right', but I am. Period.

The problems are as follows:-
a) solder creeps - with continual heat load and pressure, the solder will slowly 'creep' out of the connection. This is Extremely Bad for the particular stresses of a high current connection at the end of a cable flex.
b) if it doesn't creep then it is likely to crack instead,
c) it will not form proper intermetallics, which is a fundamental part of soldering else you get what is known as a 'dry joint', because the heat sink formed by the cable run will keep the connection cool and will not heat up to the proper solder liquidus temperature,
d) the solder will not flex like cable core strands normally will, and will therefore fatigue quickly after a series of flexing operations, leading quickly to the above,
e) the metallic connection between cable core and receptacle is NOT JUST AN ELECTRICAL CONNECTION. The cable is actually the heat sink to the connection. Heat will not escape from the pin coupling properly if you solder, the thermal conductance of solder is rubbish. If you introduce a thermal impedance on the cable side then the connection will overheat, the receptacle will relax and open up, and the plug will enter thermal runaway with your solder melting and an 'uncontrolled thermal event' happening soon after because now the thermal detection systems that might stop this happening don't work because you don't have the normal thermal paths to the cable core in place.

DON'T DO IT. DON'T DO IT. DON'T DO IT.

... If I said anything else, or failed to say that, I would be failing in my ethical duty as a Chartered Engineer and under the IEEE code of ethics, of which I am a long time member of several societies.

But, hey, if you want to insist you know best because your house has not yet burned down and you want to believe your own BS rather than a professional opinion, go ahead, I will laugh to see the charred remains of your car and house. Just make sure you and your family have suitable escape routes.

[/angry-rant-at-professional-competence-ignored]
 

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@donald can be a bit ranty at times, but sometimes he's really justified.
Please, please spend the cash and get a proper replacement.
It's cheaper than car flambé.
 

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I'd be inclined to go back to the manufacturer. The warranty sticker should just be for the internals of the unit, the connector and cable are external and would not have been affected by the move.

As the proper replacement cable wouldn't be cheap then it's worth trying to get them to replace it, plus you have the peace of mind that it should have been tested at the factory.
 
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