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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have fitted many dashcams to different vehicles since driving a taxi in Perth WA in the early 2000's. While I was the training manager for the largest taxi company there, monitoring cameras were introduced to all taxis Australia wide in the late 1990's. The benefits for both drivers and passengers became immediately apparent and as a result many drivers started to use personal dashcams for their own peace of mind.

I give this outline to illustrate that I have some expertise in this area, although my background as a former tv engineer was mainly electronics, which also has a bearing on my expertise level on this topic.

When purchasing a new dashcam, look for a device which has in order of importance:
1) Built-in GPS. This is absolutely essential as it records your speed and position. This eliminates 90% of dashcams on the market.
2) Time/Date/Speed stamp
3) At least 720 resolution, preferably 1080 or >2400, the higher the better (but more expensive)
4) A good quality sd card for recordings at least 32gb, higher for higher resolutions, do not skimp on this item.
5) A polarising filter. If you cannot bring yourself to buy a commercial one, cut down the lens from a pair of cheap sunglasses and glue on to camera lens.(I got some cheapie polaroid flip type add-ons that fit to your normal glasses and cut down the lens to fit-commercial ones are anything upwards of £30)

I use an Eborn camera now a couple of years old, but there are a few on the market now with built-in GPS-without GPS you are wasting your time, money and effort.

Installation

The Leaf was the easiest vehicle to fit a dashcam I have ever owned.
Firstly, obtain a ciggie power to USB adaptor, Poundland has them by the bucketload, but it's probably better to get a named brand one. Remove the PCB from the casing and trace from the sprung pin at the sharp end the location to which it is attached on the PCB. The earth location is obvious.
Use a heavy-duty fuse holder tap piggy-back to solder to the PCB, making sure you wire to the positive spigot solder pad. Use a heavy-duty cable to connect to the earth, see my fuse-box illustration.
Get a piggy-back mini or micro fuse holder like this:HEAVY DUTY MICRO 2 PIGGY BACK BLADE FUSE HOLDER TAP 12V MICRO2 | AUTOBEAM | eBay
Wire the tails to the PCB and after throwing away the spring spigot bit in the bin use the entry hole to bring your tails through.
This is where it goes:

dashcam_install_Fuses.jpg

I fitted it to the acc fuse.
With a plastic pry tool I was able to easily thread the cable through from the headlining, down the door pillar and then used a wire coat-hanger into the fuse box.
It was amazingly easy when compared to many other vehicles. dashcam_install_inside_windscreen_wiring.jpg dashcam_install_Front_windscreen_Outside.jpg dashcam_install_Front_windscreen_In_garage.jpg
 

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Unless I am mistaken, there is an airbag in the door pillar, just under the cover. I suggest it is not wise to use a coat hanger to draw cables through there.


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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Msmuir-Yes you are right-it was not the door pillar that I used the coat-hanger on, it was from the door pillar to the fuse box that I used the coat-hanger as a draw-wire. I will modify the original post if the site will allow it.
 
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