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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have fitted many dashcams to different vehicles since driving a taxi in Perth WA in the early 2000's. While I was the training manager for the largest taxi company there, monitoring cameras were introduced to all taxis Australia wide in the late 1990's. The benefits for both drivers and passengers became immediately apparent and as a result many drivers started to use personal dashcams for their own peace of mind.

I give this outline to illustrate that I have some expertise in this area, although my background as a former tv engineer was mainly electronics, which also has a bearing on my expertise level on this topic.

When purchasing a new dashcam, look for a device which has in order of importance:
1) Built-in GPS. This is absolutely essential as it records your speed and position. This eliminates 90% of dashcams on the market.
2) Time/Date/Speed stamp
3) At least 720 resolution, preferably 1080 or >2400, the higher the better (but more expensive)
4) A good quality sd card for recordings at least 32gb, higher for higher resolutions, do not skimp on this item.
5) A polarising filter. If you cannot bring yourself to buy a commercial one, cut down the lens from a pair of cheap sunglasses and glue on to camera lens.(I got some cheapie polaroid flip type add-ons that fit to your normal glasses and cut down the lens to fit-commercial ones are anything upwards of £30)

I use an Eborn camera now a couple of years old, but there are a few on the market now with built-in GPS-without GPS you are wasting your time, money and effort.

Installation


The Leaf was the easiest vehicle to fit a dashcam I have ever owned.
Firstly, obtain a ciggie power to USB adaptor, Poundland has them by the bucketload, but it's probably better to get a named brand one. Remove the PCB from the casing and trace from the sprung pin at the sharp end the location to which it is attached on the PCB. The earth location is obvious.
Use a heavy-duty fuse holder tap piggy-back to solder to the PCB, making sure you wire to the positive spigot solder pad. Use a heavy-duty cable to connect to the earth, see my fuse-box illustration.
Get a piggy-back mini or micro fuse holder like this:HEAVY DUTY MICRO 2 PIGGY BACK BLADE FUSE HOLDER TAP 12V MICRO2 | AUTOBEAM | eBay
Wire the tails to the PCB and after throwing away the spring spigot bit in the bin use the entry hole to bring your tails through.
This is where it goes:

dashcam_install_Fuses.jpg

I fitted it to the acc fuse.
With a plastic pry tool I was able to easily thread the cable through from the headlining, down the door pillar and then used a wire coat-hanger into the fuse box.
It was amazingly easy when compared to many other vehicles. dashcam_install_inside_windscreen_wiring.jpg dashcam_install_Front_windscreen_Outside.jpg dashcam_install_Front_windscreen_In_garage.jpg
 
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Unless I am mistaken, there is an airbag in the door pillar, just under the cover. I suggest it is not wise to use a coat hanger to draw cables through there.


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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Msmuir-Yes you are right-it was not the door pillar that I used the coat-hanger on, it was from the door pillar to the fuse box that I used the coat-hanger as a draw-wire. I will modify the original post if the site will allow it.
 

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Many thanks for the detailed description and information about the dashcamera installation Barfly. That spured me on to install a front/rear camera in my 2015 24kW Leaf. While I was at it, I also added a USB charging cable, off the same fuse connection, so my phone can charge while it is on it's holder on the right of the steering wheel. The only amendment to your installation guide would be to check the piggy back fuse holder type in your own vehicle before ordering one. The one in the guide didn't fit my car, so I needed to order another one, still very cheap but a pain not to be able to finish the job in one go. Very happy with the final result.
 

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So the fuse in the picture is from my Leaf, and the connector on the right was what was delivered from the eBay link in the installation guide. I've no idea if the fuse sizes are different between different Leaf model years. You can see in the second picture the correct fuse piggy (on the left) next to the one delivered from the same company using the link in the guide.
IMG_20200719_103010580.jpg
IMG_20200726_175737582.jpg
 

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I did almost exactly this on both my X-Type and Z3 but my cameras have separate GPS aerials stuck to the windscreen outside the heated screen mesh footprint (X-Type only). A Viofo camera is wedge shaped and fixes to the top of the screen quite unobtrusively, and the circular polarising filter (optional but essential) makes it even harder to spot. This thread (thanks Barfly) has reminded me to look at an installation in my Good Lady's Leaf.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I also installed a rear camera. I used an SQ11 available from multiple sellers Amazon or Ebay. I bought four for £8.95 each. This is my install method:-
From the 12volt fuse tap for the front dash-cam take another feed and thread it through under the door sills and the rear nearside wheel arch to the rear boot locker, where the tyre gunk and compressor are stored.
133633

This is a real piece of cake, this car is super easy for adding wiring. Terminate in a ciggie lighter socket, any motor accessory store or ebay/Amazon has them.
133634


Affix the tiny camera to the centre of the rear window, I tried various methods, velcro, double-sided tape but by far the best method which has worked for me and has stayed put for over six months is a hot-melt glue gun.
133635


The lead that comes with the camera is not quite long enough so I used a longer one from an old nokia mobile 'phone. The socket on my cameras were different to the Nokia's standard micro usb (naturally these cameras use a proprietary termination) so I joined the + and - 5 volt cables with the 5volt charger from the Nokia. It has been working well for over six months.
Feeding this cable through the concertina cable conduits proved more trouble than it is worth so I just poked it into the lining and allowed six inches of the cable to show but only when the boot lid is up. If you want to completely hide the cable on yours be my guest.....
133639


This is how it looks when the boot lid is down, it is very unobtrusive except at night when there is a red led glowing.
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Total cost about £15 plus 3 hours work.

One tip- if you use the SQ 11 or clone cameras, if you want the correct date you have to create a text file in the root directory of your SD card.
This is how except the manual is wrong. The text file MUST be called TIMEREST.txt not TIMERSET.txt
• Setting the date and time
Connect the mini video camera to the computer. Setting the time is
done by creating a text file named «TIMERSET.txt» in the root
directory of the device's memory card, with the following content:
«YYYYMMDDHHMMSS» «Y» (or «N», if you do not want the date
and time stamp displayed on video files)
For example, «20170625140003 Y»
After saving the file, disconnect the video camera from the computer
and turn it on.

Attached is my attempt to write a more English manual rather than the Chinglish with which it comes.....
 

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@Barfly dispite your thoughts on the colour of your car my other half LOVES it and wishes we also had a “chestnut” car!

I personally never trust 12v plugs and sockets, I think it’s something else to go wrong.

I got a kit from amazon for £12 that is great. Just watch how they terminate as some kits use an adapter near the item that’s a usb to mini/micro , I made sure I bought one with the correct adapter hard wired as I think adapters look ugly.

I took my rear through the big rubber thing and it was difficult but looks neat. I would recommend a wire coat hanger and lots of lube, either coat the wire in washing up liquid or give it and the tube a good squirt of silicone spray.

oh and DONT remove the side trim of the back door as mine got a hairline crack, all you need to remove is the trim in the middle.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
@Barfly dispite your thoughts on the colour of your car my other half LOVES it and wishes we also had a “chestnut” car!

I personally never trust 12v plugs and sockets, I think it’s something else to go wrong.

I got a kit from amazon for £12 that is great. Just watch how they terminate as some kits use an adapter near the item that’s a usb to mini/micro , I made sure I bought one with the correct adapter hard wired as I think adapters look ugly.

I took my rear through the big rubber thing and it was difficult but looks neat. I would recommend a wire coat hanger and lots of lube, either coat the wire in washing up liquid or give it and the tube a good squirt of silicone spray.

oh and DONT remove the side trim of the back door as mine got a hairline crack, all you need to remove is the trim in the middle.
John- Thanks for your input, it is appreciated. With regard to 12v plugs/sockets, the reason I went that route is because Nissan skimped on so many areas with the Leaf. There is no 12v socket at the rear, the light in the boot is a waste of space, no puddle lights, all just mean penny-pinching in my opinion. When a car is nearly £38,000 new, these things are expected.
I attached a dual-12v socket to my outlet in the back so I had the convenience of a 12v socket in the boot. This is more convenient for blowing up my bicycle tyres and other things such as my laptop and battery shaver.
Good on you for going through the bellows tube, maybe one day I'll get around to it.........
Cheers Tony.
 
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One advantage of bringing the power cable down to the 12v socket is that you can then also power it from battery box - sometimes useful if you are parking up for a few hours.
 
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