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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New to this forum. I cannot DC charge my car. Do I need settings and what should they be. Recently tried to connect to Instavolt charger and AC charger was out of service. Could not get DC charger to work.
 

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Have you tried another charger to rule out the possibility that the Instavolt you used was faulty? Try and visit a different charger and give it another try. Ideally a non-Instavolt location to rule out user error with their chargers too.

Make sure your car is switched off, tap your card or use the app, plug in and it should just work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Have you tried another charger to rule out the possibility that the Instavolt you used was faulty? Try and visit a different charger and give it another try. Ideally a non-Instavolt location to rule out user error with their chargers too.

Make sure your car is switched off, tap your card or use the app, plug in and it should just work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for reply. On same day tried DC on Electric Highway it still did not work. Changed to AC and worked, slow but it worked. On the car EV settings the AC icons are both lit but the DC appears blank, even when I set the limit low. Do not know if that is a clue.
 

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GOLF GTE PHEV
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Did you select the CCS connector on the charger if it also supports chademo.

Did you use the large CCS connector and not use a type 2 cable used only for AC charging? (google will show the different types) (sounds like you may have used the AC cable)

There should be a green plug icon illuminated if the car & charger have established a connection.
This will flash whilst charging is taking place.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Did you select the CCS connector on the charger if it also supports chademo.

Did you use the large CCS connector and not use a type 2 cable used only for AC charging? (google will show the different types) (sounds like you may have used the AC cable)

There should be a green plug icon illuminated if the car & charger have established a connection.
This will flash whilst charging is taking place.
Have to reply this way as I’m struggling with forum site. I used the large rapid tethered lead. Rapid: CCS

Max DC rate: 77kW

Then changed to the AC connector.

Replied once on site but cannot remember how. Cheers This was my email reply.
 

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Kia Soul EV 2020 64KWh
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New to this forum. I cannot DC charge my car. Do I need settings and what should they be. Recently tried to connect to Instavolt charger and AC charger was out of service. Could not get DC charger to work.
There must be some confusion. Instavolt chargers don't do AC charging, as far as I am aware.

Was the Electric highway one you tried one of the old units or one of the replacement new units? You can tell the old ones because (a) they need an app to work and (b) they have the old 'Green Union Jack' logo on them. If it was one of them, then the fact it didn't work is not likely to be a reflection of an issue with your car or how you used it but more likely a reflection of the state of the charger. They don't tend to work for anyone. Hence why they are in the process of being replaced. I suspect it was one of these because the vast majority of the replacements (all of them?) are DC only as well, like the Instavolts.
 

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Kia e-Niro 4 MY20, Zoe Z.E.50 GT Line
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If you’re not using it already, it’s worth getting Zap-Map and using this to help plan charge stops. The data from users isn’t perfect but if a charger has a problem it will likely have been reported by someone. Very few of the old ecotricity chargers still work, especially the CCS connector.
 

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Also… should it be helpful…. The distinction between how AC and DC charging works: AC charging provides mains power to the car’s onboard charger. There is some simple signalling that instructs the charge point to switch on the supply and informs the car how much current it can draw. Whether using a granny charger, 32A home charge point, supermarket AC charge post or the type2 socket on a rapid, it will work the same way. On the Niro 2 I believe you’re limited to 7kW, which is single phase 32A. Although many charge points can supply more, 11/22/43kW, your car will max out at 7kW.

DC charging uses the large pins at the bottom of the combo connector to connect the rapid charger to the car’s battery. There is more sophisticated signalling between the car and charger that allows the car to control the charge delivered and report state of charge to the charger. The speed of a DC charge will depend on the capability of the charger, the capability of the car and the battery’s current state of charge. The charge rate will drop in steps as the state of charge increases. See the fastned graphs for the Niro.

On the Niro (not sure if this applies to the 2), for both AC and DC you can set the max target state of charge, referred to as the charging limit. Slightly confusingly Kia use the terms standard and fast whereas in the UK we’ve adopted fast and rapid. If, in your test, your car was at 90% SOC and the charge limit was set to 80% the car would not charge.

Additionally for AC you can set charge timers and reduce the maximum current the car will use, regardless of what’s announced by the charge point. These settings have no effect on DC charging.
 

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Where are you based? Maybe someone who has some more experience could have a quick look with you and determine if it's an issue with the car.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
There must be some confusion. Instavolt chargers don't do AC charging, as far as I am aware.

Was the Electric highway one you tried one of the old units or one of the replacement new units? You can tell the old ones because (a) they need an app to work and (b) they have the old 'Green Union Jack' logo on them. If it was one of them, then the fact it didn't work is not likely to be a reflection of an issue with your car or how you used it but more likely a reflection of the state of the charger. They don't tend to work for anyone. Hence why they are in the process of being replaced. I suspect it was one of these because the vast majority of the replacements (all of them?) are DC only as well, like the Instavolts.
I thought the Instavolt had a type 2 tethered plug so I asummed, maybe incorrectly that it was AC.
The Electric Highway said you needed an app but we found out it was free, so I tried the DC but it did not work so had to use the AC which was slow. I don't remember see the Green Union Jack logo, but it was dark and 1:00 am in the morning. The Niro 2 64 is capaple of charging with DC is it not? Is there a limitation on the Kw you can charge at. Also concerned that in the EV car set-up the icon next to the DC does not seem fully lit like the AC set ups. Thanks for your help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Also… should it be helpful…. The distinction between how AC and DC charging works: AC charging provides mains power to the car’s onboard charger. There is some simple signalling that instructs the charge point to switch on the supply and informs the car how much current it can draw. Whether using a granny charger, 32A home charge point, supermarket AC charge post or the type2 socket on a rapid, it will work the same way. On the Niro 2 I believe you’re limited to 7kW, which is single phase 32A. Although many charge points can supply more, 11/22/43kW, your car will max out at 7kW.

DC charging uses the large pins at the bottom of the combo connector to connect the rapid charger to the car’s battery. There is more sophisticated signalling between the car and charger that allows the car to control the charge delivered and report state of charge to the charger. The speed of a DC charge will depend on the capability of the charger, the capability of the car and the battery’s current state of charge. The charge rate will drop in steps as the state of charge increases. See the fastned graphs for the Niro.

On the Niro (not sure if this applies to the 2), for both AC and DC you can set the max target state of charge, referred to as the charging limit. Slightly confusingly Kia use the terms standard and fast whereas in the UK we’ve adopted fast and rapid. If, in your test, your car was at 90% SOC and the charge limit was set to 80% the car would not charge.

Additionally for AC you can set charge timers and reduce the maximum current the car will use, regardless of what’s announced by the charge point. These settings have no effect on DC charging.
Hi Have just seen your comprehensive reply, many thanks appreciated.
 

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Kia e-Niro 4 MY20, Zoe Z.E.50 GT Line
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I thought the Instavolt had a type 2 tethered plug so I asummed, maybe incorrectly that it was AC.
The Electric Highway said you needed an app but we found out it was free, so I tried the DC but it did not work so had to use the AC which was slow. I don't remember see the Green Union Jack logo, but it was dark and 1:00 am in the morning. The Niro 2 64 is capaple of charging with DC is it not? Is there a limitation on the Kw you can charge at. Also concerned that in the EV car set-up the icon next to the DC does not seem fully lit like the AC set ups. Thanks for your help.
The ChargePoint units Instavolt use are DC only, much to the chargrin of Zoe owners. Instavolt offer CCS and CHAdeMO. They're a good choice for anyone with a CCS capable car like the Niro.

The new Gridserve Electric Highway chargers don't generally have AC either, although some units with an type 2 socket are being installed, so it was definitely one of the older Ecotricity chargers. It seems these have always had unreliable CCS and they're pretty much all bust now, not much longer for this world. Right now a good tip is to avoid Welcome Break services because they haven't been upgraded. Many Moto services have. A gotcha with the Gridserve chargers is they can only charge one car at a time at the moment. That will fixed at some unspecified point in the future.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The ChargePoint units Instavolt use are DC only, much to the chargrin of Zoe owners. Instavolt offer CCS and CHAdeMO. They're a good choice for anyone with a CCS capable car like the Niro.

The new Gridserve Electric Highway chargers don't generally have AC either, although some units with an type 2 socket are being installed, so it was definitely one of the older Ecotricity chargers. It seems these have always had unreliable CCS and they're pretty much all bust now, not much longer for this world. Right now a good tip is to avoid Welcome Break services because they haven't been upgraded. Many Moto services have. A gotcha with the Gridserve chargers is they can only charge one car at a time at the moment. That will fixed at some unspecified point in the future.
Thanks. I'm running the battery down and then will try locally. Will stick with DC charging as this appears the way of the future. However I did read in one of the manuals that you should not charge the Niro too many times on DC. Is this overcome by limitation of the charge rate you mentioned "your car will max out at 7kW" ?.
 

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However I did read in one of the manuals that you should not charge the Niro too many times on DC.
"Battery performance and durability can deteriorate if the DC charger is used constantly.
Use of DC charger should be minimised in order to help prolong high voltage battery life"
It's not that bad. You'll shorten the life if you charge it up to 100% every day on DC, but normal use will do no harm.
It is better to AC charge for everyday use if you can, of course.
Far more important is
1 - to avoid charging the car beyond 80% unless you are immediately about to embark on a long trip
2 - Never leave the battery fully charged (or over 80%) for long periods.
Those guidelines apply to both AC and DC charging: it's not the charging rate but leaving the battery in a high state of charge that does most of the damage.
Is this overcome by limitation of the charge rate you mentioned "your car will max out at 7kW" ?.
That was in the context of AC charging - the Niro 2 won't charge at more than 7kW because the AC charging circuit is single phase, and 11kW or more needs 3 phase. It has nothing to do with limiting the rate for battery damage. DC charging can go over 70kW in the e-Niro, and the battery management system limits the charging current depending on state of charge and temperature, always to a safe level, and also cools or heats the battery if needed for best performance.
 

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Is this overcome by limitation of the charge rate you mentioned "your car will max out at 7kW" ?.
Perhaps I should have added that, to the extent that excessive DC charging can cause any battery deterioration, yes, in general the reason why is because DC charging does involve much higher charging rates than AC charging.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks to you all, my first experience of this forum is very good. I will let you know how my next experience of charging goes. Driving an electric car has really been all about charging especially public charging, however thoroughly enjoying the experience, thanks again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I ran the battery down, found a Instavolt charger. There were two chargers, one was faulty. Plugged into other one and it only took about 23 minutes. Charger iniatially at 44kw and eneded at 23Kw. There was no limiting to the 7.4Kw as mentioned.Only got my car about 4 weeks ago do you think they have upped the DC charge rate. Only charged to 80% of capacity. Hope I haven't done anything wrong.
 
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