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Is anyone in Cambridgeshire who owns an electric vehicle, or who is simply passionate about them, able to spare 20-30 minutes for a short interview?

I am a 3rd year student at Royal Holloway University of London completing a dissertation under the working title "An investigation into the role of environmental values in the adoption of electric vehicles". Your participation would involve the completion of a very short form followed by a short interview lasting 20-30 minutes. If you wish to participate or simply want to find out more please either comment on this thread or email me at [email protected].
 

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Ah I did my undergrad at RHUL :)

I live in Herts and I don't get my EV till October/November, otherwise would have been happy to help as an alumni member!
Thank you anyway!
Ah I did my undergrad at RHUL :)

I live in Herts and I don't get my EV till October/November, otherwise would have been happy to help as an alumni member!
 

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.............................. under the working title "An investigation into the role of environmental values in the adoption of electric vehicles".
An interesting subject. For what it's worth I think that quite a few early adopters of EV ownership would fall into the category where an interest in 'green' issues was a part of their lives as well. As EVs became gradually more capable of emulating normal fossil fuel cars a few more would get on board. Especially ones who had already invested in solar from a mix of environment and economic reasons. They would like the idea of filling their car rather than sell the spare electricity to the company. So the EV was partly environment and partly cheap motoring. Over time, as these cars become capable of driving 250 miles from an overnight charge, and as the infrastructure moves to enable distance travel by 15-minute boosts, most owners will be just buying a car - and will have little or no interest in any environmental benefits. I think that you will have to take care when evaluating today's environmental role because within a few years the initial strong green influence in the buying decision will change rapidly. Even today, there are a lot of early adopters who fall into the category of 'innovation nerds' and have no over-riding desire to save the planet that would influence their buying decision.
 

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An interesting subject. For what it's worth I think that quite a few early adopters of EV ownership would fall into the category where an interest in 'green' issues was a part of their lives as well. As EVs became gradually more capable of emulating normal fossil fuel cars a few more would get on board. Especially ones who had already invested in solar from a mix of environment and economic reasons. They would like the idea of filling their car rather than sell the spare electricity to the company. So the EV was partly environment and partly cheap motoring. Over time, as these cars become capable of driving 250 miles from an overnight charge, and as the infrastructure moves to enable distance travel by 15-minute boosts, most owners will be just buying a car - and will have little or no interest any environmental benefits. I think that you will have to take care when evaluating today's environmental role because within a few years the initial strong green influence in the buying decision will change rapidly. Even today, there a lot of early adopters who fall into the category of 'innovation nerds' and have no over-riding desire to save the planet that influenced their buying decision.
This is an extremely interesting and insightful perspective. I had not considered it in this way before and so I will be sure to consider this going forward! Thank you for your comment, and should you have any further comments on the topic I would gratefully receive them.
 

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So the EV was partly environment and partly cheap motoring.
That describes us. We also got our first EV (Feb. 2014) to show that even an '80 mile' car is practical.
 

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An interesting subject. For what it's worth I think that quite a few early adopters of EV ownership would fall into the category where an interest in 'green' issues was a part of their lives as well. As EVs became gradually more capable of emulating normal fossil fuel cars a few more would get on board. Especially ones who had already invested in solar from a mix of environment and economic reasons. They would like the idea of filling their car rather than sell the spare electricity to the company. So the EV was partly environment and partly cheap motoring. Over time, as these cars become capable of driving 250 miles from an overnight charge, and as the infrastructure moves to enable distance travel by 15-minute boosts, most owners will be just buying a car - and will have little or no interest any environmental benefits. I think that you will have to take care when evaluating today's environmental role because within a few years the initial strong green influence in the buying decision will change rapidly. Even today, there a lot of early adopters who fall into the category of 'innovation nerds' and have no over-riding desire to save the planet that influenced their buying decision.
I agree with this (which makes me feel all strange as I rarely agree with hitstirrer :) ). When we first bought our leaf all the interest came from people with green leanings. Nowadays people are more likely to be interested in running costs. I was a bit of both - I'd been interested in EV's for a long time and bought (used) when the price dropped to a level that I was comfortable with.
The other thing you could look at is the influence of tax costs/BIK/capital write downs. I know a couple of people who have gone ev on the back of company car financials.

It is interesting to see the way that the different manufacturers have already built quite a segmented market to cater to the different consumer drivers.
The big thing that I think Tesla did was make EV's techno-cool.
 

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As @another mentions, there is also a strong social engineering element involved where gov't policies aim to comply with world directives by carrot and stick measures using taxation to steer buyers away from air-polluting cars towards cleaner solutions. By giving tax breaks to business users as he says, a very large shift can be engineered towards EVs. And we all see the ordinary VED changes with that same aim. All of these are environment driven measures but individual buyers who go along with the incentives are not necessarily greenies themselves.

He also introduces the Tesla effect. That alone has been hugely influential in the public perception of EVs. But whilst Elon Musk will openly admit that his worldview is to move from the oil age into the renewable energy age he is achieving that by stealth using the high tech approach where an EV is now seen as 'the way forward' by modern thinking people. I am quite sure that hardly any Tesla owners are also rabid environmentalists. They just love the EV experience and all the toys provided to them. But Elon has also moved his vision forward as well. Using that tech approach falls well inside your dissertation remit. Just by a different route.
 

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That describes us. We also got our first EV (Feb. 2014) to show that even an '80 mile' car is practical.
You said first EV, may I ask if you have had more than 1 since this time? If so, did your motivation for purchase differ at all after the purchase of your first EV? Could I also ask the models of the vehicles. Thanks.
 

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I agree with this (which makes me feel all strange as I rarely agree with hitstirrer :) ). When we first bought our leaf all the interest came from people with green leanings. Nowadays people are more likely to be interested in running costs. I was a bit of both - I'd been interested in EV's for a long time and bought (used) when the price dropped to a level that I was comfortable with.
The other thing you could look at is the influence of tax costs/BIK/capital write downs. I know a couple of people who have gone ev on the back of company car financials.

It is interesting to see the way that the different manufacturers have already built quite a segmented market to cater to the different consumer drivers.
The big thing that I think Tesla did was make EV's techno-cool.
Another really useful insight! Would you mind expanding on what you mean by building a segmented market to cater to the different consumer drivers? I would be extremely interested in hearing more of your perspective on this. Thanks.
 

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As @another mentions, there is also a strong social engineering element involved where gov't policies aim to comply with world directives by carrot and stick measures using taxation to steer buyers away from air-polluting cars towards cleaner solutions. By giving tax breaks to business users as he says, a very large shift can be engineered towards EVs. And we all see the ordinary VED changes with that same aim. All of these are environment driven measures but individual buyers who go along with the incentives are not necessarily greenies themselves.

He also introduces the Tesla effect. That alone has been hugely influential in the public perception of EVs. But whilst Elon Musk will openly admit that his worldview is to move from the oil age into the renewable energy age he is achieving that by stealth using the high tech approach where an EV is now seen as 'the way forward' by modern thinking people. I am quite sure that hardly any Tesla owners are also rabid environmentalists. They just love the EV experience and all the toys provided to them. But Elon has also moved his vision forward as well. Using that tech approach falls well inside your dissertation remit. Just by a different route.
Thank you, this is definitely something that I will be considering within my dissertation. It is an interesting concept, the Tesla effect. It will be interesting to investigate whether there are differences in the value sets between those who own Teslas and other EVs. I will also be looking at government policies within my dissertation so another useful insight and aspect to consider. Once again, thanks.
 

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You said first EV, may I ask if you have had more than 1 since this time? If so, did your motivation for purchase differ at all after the purchase of your first EV? Could I also ask the models of the vehicles. Thanks.
Sure --

We bought a Nissan LEAF Tekna in Feburary 2014. We bought the car on a 37 month PCP contract. At the time, I didn't want to purchase the car outright incase owning an EV didn't work out. I also knew EV technology was changing and the car would be depricated by the end of the contract.

At the end of the contract I handed the car back to Nissan finance. It was worth far less than the optional final purchase price.

After 3 years of living with an EV, I found that yes we really did save money and cut pollution. Our fuel savings were around £100 per month. On top of that we don't have to queue for fuel every few days. LEAF is very quiet and relaxing to drive. We did make compromises but they were all ones I could live with. With the first car, we shopped both electric and petrol cars. When it came time to replace the 2014 LEAF, we only looked at EVs.

In the end I got a 2017 LEAF 30 on a bargain PCP contract. Choosing LEAF over other EVs was based entirely on price. Nissan had a very compelling PCP offer in the first 1/2 of 2017. The updated 2017 LEAF is easier to live with than the old car. It has about 25 miles more range (100 winter, 125 summer) and it rapid charges faster than the older model. That makes medium distance trips much easier.

I don't know what I'm going to do when the current PCP contract ends in April 2019. Cars due to be on sale then are substantially better than the early adopter LEAF I'm driving now. The problem is they no longer have the huge discount we got in 2017 or even the modest one from 2014. I want to trade up to one of the latest and far better electric cars but they will all be at a much higher monthly payment.


Many people that got a Nissan EV on the 2017 bargain deals just for the savings are going to go back to combustion engine cars. I've already seen the grumbling on the forums. I'm commited to staying electric if at all possible. I might be trading down to a older used car to stay in budget.
 

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Rebecca, I'm not sure if this comes under "environmental values" I suspect that term relates to external environment as experienced by those outside the EV. But you could also consider the environment the EV driver is in. Having driven a silent EV for 3 years now, I've noticed 2 benefits that I'd never remotely considered when I was researching an EV.

1) I've found that the way the car goes means that I'm a lot more relaxed & less stressed when driving than I used to be. I think this is due to less noise inside the car as no revving/clutching/gearbox activity required, and the rapid acceleration available instantly means I can leave a longer gap between me & the car in front, as I can instantly closethat gap right down if needed, e.g. approaching a traffic light I htink is about to turn red!

2) I suffer from tinnitus, not badly, but it's a constant low-volume whistle in my ears, and being in a conventional noisy car doesn't help. I actually find normal petrol cars unpleasantly loud, nt havign access to luxury models which may well be much quieter. My EV is super silent, and I like that a lot.

So I consider my personal environment to be far more pleasant in an EV, than in an ICE. Whether this is a huge sales-promoter I don't know, but I think it's worthwhile people knowing about it.
 

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[QUOTE="andrew*debbie, post: 2359678, member: 416"I don't know what I'm going to do when the current PCP contract ends in April 2019.[/QUOTE]

It sounds like buying your current Leaf may be a good option for you? It's a used car but used by you, so you know its foibles and treatment. One thing I hope the move to EVs brings us longer term is breaking the cycle of treating cars as a three year throw-away consumable. Obviously this is encouraged by the manufacturers. I realise interiors and things will still wear out but maybe we'll get to a position where it's normal to keep a car for closer to ten years instead of three.
 

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It sounds like buying your current Leaf may be a good option for you?
Perhaps. The contract has a heavily subvented final value. Nissan deliberately set the guaranteed final value(GFV) unrealistically high to reduce the monthly payments.

If RCI (Nissan Finance) will let me buy the car at CAP instead of GFV, I might keep it. The battery has almost all of the original capacity and the car has no significant issues. Even if we can buy the car for CAP, keeping the LEAF will mean more money per month from us. We would be off the PCP merry-go-round and still in an electric car.

What else?

I'm watching i3 prices. There are occasionally good personal lease offers.

Watching new LEAF prices with little hope of the car coming down to a price I'm willing to pay.

I doubt I can get Debbie to agree to a Soul EV at any price.

Another possibility is a used Kangoo Z.E. 33 van. We drove the original phase one Kangoo Z.E. and both liked it. The is a low milage ex-demo on Autotrader for 8,400 + VAT + battery rental. Lack of rapid charging is a big minus though.

With eNV-200 allocation sold out well into next year, Nissan have no reason to offer a discount.

We both would like a Model 3. Doubt we can make it fit in the budget.

Kona is not for us, especially at current prices.

Waiting for details on the Peugeot 208 BEV.
 

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I agree with this (which makes me feel all strange as I rarely agree with hitstirrer :) ). When we first bought our leaf all the interest came from people with green leanings. Nowadays people are more likely to be interested in running costs. I was a bit of both - I'd been interested in EV's for a long time and bought (used) when the price dropped to a level that I was comfortable with.
The other thing you could look at is the influence of tax costs/BIK/capital write downs. I know a couple of people who have gone ev on the back of company car financials.
.
Thats what I"m finding as well (cost, not the bit about agreeing with hitstirrer :ROFLMAO:), the initial q's i got were the usual "how long long does it take to charge" and "how far will it go" but I'm also getting "how much does it cost to run? Wow?" and i think the latter (and company car tax) will be a key reason to buy over the next few years.

That and I suppose the ULEV reason, ie buying one because you can run it in a city either at all or without huge penalty, and whilst at root the reason is environmental, thats not coming from the buyer, who would likely buy a car that was fuelled by chopped up fluffy kittens spewing novichok from the exhaust if that was what the regulations required to drive in the city.
 
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