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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've recently replaced the PTC heater on our 2014 Gen2 (UK built AZE0. I couldn't find any info about how to do the job for right-hand-drive vehicles. Some reports suggested the whole dash may need to be removed*, I managed to do it without removing the whole dash. It was a bit tight, but possible.

*apparently, removing the whole dash is easier than the way I did it! Although, to me this sounds like a lot of extra work.

Here's a video of how I did it, hopefully this could be useful to someone in the future:


Here's a photo album of the job: Nissan LEAF PTC Heater Replacement

This car is a Gen2 AZE0 Acenta which has both a heat pump ant PTC heater, the PTC is used to provide instant powerful heat, while the heat pump is used to efficiently maintain cabin temperature. Only the PTC heater is used during cabin pre-heating and the heat pump does not function very well in sub-zero temperatures, therefore a faulty PTC heater causes significant issues when trying to heat and defrost the car in winter.

I replaced the PTC heater unit with a 2nd hand unit that cost £250.
  • Faulty PTC part number: 27143-3NF0B. Measured 1.9M ohm resistance, indicate fault?
  • Replacement (2nd hand) PTC part number: 27143-3NF1A. Measured 5 Mega Ohms across HV terminals

Knowledge of high voltage DC safe working procedures essential, 400V DC is serious

HV power down procedure:
  • Turn off car - Wait 10min
  • Disconnect 12V battery
  • Remove HV service disconnect using class 0 HV protection gloves
  • Disconnect PTC heater connector from battery pack using class 0 HV protection gloves

I take no responsibility, seek professional advice before undertaking any work
 

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One question I have - why does your 2014 Gen 2 Leaf have the light cream interior ? I thought that was a Gen 1 only thing.
 

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One question I have - why does your 2014 Gen 2 Leaf have the light cream interior ? I thought that was a Gen 1 only thing.
Some of the Acenta transition models had the light interior. Whether it was using up old stocks or intended to be an option which got discontinued I don't know.
 

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One question I have - why does your 2014 Gen 2 Leaf have the light cream interior ? I thought that was a Gen 1 only thing.
There were a few made with the light cream interior, though that wasn't in the brochure. There's also a number of Acenta Leafs built with 'cold weather' option pack which wasn't in the brochures, which had (fabric) heated seats and steering wheel, and heated wing mirrors from the Tekna spec, but didn't have the all-around view, leather seats and subwoofer that that Tekna had. I nearly bought an ex-demo one like that, but it was mis-sold as having a 6.6kW on-board charger, which it didn't have.
Just because it's not in the brochures doesn't mean it can't be ordered, in the dealer ordering system there's codes for all manner of factory-fit options that aren't in the brochures. Typically, each country market might have a set of options that their marketing people think will sell well in that territory, which goes into the brochure for that country, but the factory produces everything to order. Leafs destined for the Irish Republic didn't have Versa/Acenta/Tekna spec designations but SV/SL etc, but they were all built on the same production line in Sunderland. The only issue is that pricing for each option might not be have been defined in certain currencies.
 

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What surprised me about this video is that the foot parking brake says "Push on/Push off" - as if I'm ever going to stick my head into the footwell to read it :ROFLMAO:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
There were a few made with the light cream interior, though that wasn't in the brochure. There's also a number of Acenta Leafs built with 'cold weather' option pack which wasn't in the brochures, which had (fabric) heated seats and steering wheel, and heated wing mirrors from the Tekna spec, but didn't have the all-around view, leather seats and subwoofer that that Tekna had
Yup, this is exactly the spec of my Leaf. It's a bit of a unicorn cream interior, cold weather package, chrome package, privacy package and 6.6kW onboard charger. It was delivered in early January 2014 so one of the first UK built. They were probably just using up parts. I love it, apart from the cream interior, it's impossible to keep clean!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Interesting thanks. Did not know mine had a PTC heater. I guess it does as it a 2013 Acenta.
Yes, all Leafs have PTC heaters a heat pump is not able to deliver a large amount of heat quickly. When my PTC was broken the heat pump alone was not able to melt ice from the screen even after running it on max for over 1hr. The PTC heats ups instantly and delivers a lot of heat...using a lot of energy in the process! But once the cabin is up to temperature only a very small amount of energy is required to drive the heat pump to maintain the temperature.

On your 2013 Leaf you probably only have a PTC heater if it's a gen 1 model. The PTC heaters for the gen1 models are different to this one. They are located under the 12V battery under the hood are are a liquid heating system. The PTC in gen2 (2014+) models is a direct air PTC heater located in the drivers footwell for RHD cars on under the glove box for LDD
 

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Well done on fitting the replacement yourself. It looks like a nightmarish job to me! Really hope this isn’t a common fault to develop as i would guess a dealer would charge in the thousands to undertake the job, and it’s certainly something I wouldn’t have the skills to attempt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well done on fitting the replacement yourself. It looks like a nightmarish job to me! Really hope this isn’t a common fault to develop as i would guess a dealer would charge in the thousands to undertake the job, and it’s certainly something I wouldn’t have the skills to attempt.
Thanks. I've heard £3000 quoted from Nissan. Your best bet would be a HEVRA garage, you would probably also get better service. I've heard of a few PTC failures but it's probably not that common considering how many Leafs are out in the wild. The good news is that good 2nd hand parts from salvage Leafs are easily available. The replacement PTC I fitted was £250 2nd hand, if your lucky I've seen them got for less on ebay. However, I was in a rush and just bought the first one I found, I didn't want to endure any more commuting in a sub-zero temperature car for much longer!
 

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On your 2013 Leaf you probably only have a PTC heater if it's a gen 1 model. The PTC heaters for the gen1 models are different to this one. They are located under the 12V battery under the hood are are a liquid heating system. The PTC in gen2 (2014+) models is a direct air PTC heater located in the drivers footwell for RHD cars on under the glove box for LDD
Mine is a gen 2, one of the first ones. I notice on the energy display that the consumption is low on heating or a/c, like under 2kW but maybe it’s more for first few mins if the PTC kicks in.

As an aside they have just built 8 houses near me that are heat pump heated only. The smaller houses have 1.7kW input and 5 to 6kW output to heat a house that is 3 bed and 1500sq ft. So that is a heat pump that is not hugely bigger than the Leaf to heat a much bigger volume. Shows how well insulated new houses can be. A gas boiler on a similar 20 year old house might be 40kW. Even the larger 4 bed ones only have a 7 to 8kW output pump. OK this is Hampshire but it is still -1C today and dropping lower overnight.
 

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Well done on fitting the replacement yourself. It looks like a nightmarish job to me! Really hope this isn’t a common fault to develop as i would guess a dealer would charge in the thousands to undertake the job, and it’s certainly something I wouldn’t have the skills to attempt.
Yes well done. Looks a bit similar to changing the ventilation fan or fan speed change resistors in a typical car. I've done this on a Renault Scenic. Have to be quite supple to get in under the dashboard. Not sure my age allows this anymore!
 

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Yes, all Leafs have PTC heaters a heat pump is not able to deliver a large amount of heat quickly. When my PTC was broken the heat pump alone was not able to melt ice from the screen even after running it on max for over 1hr. The PTC heats ups instantly and delivers a lot of heat...using a lot of energy in the process! But once the cabin is up to temperature only a very small amount of energy is required to drive the heat pump to maintain the temperature.
Was this with the car turned on or timed/remote preconditioning?

Preconditioning, plugged in or unplugged does not use the heat pump only the PTC heater. So if your PTC heater was faulty, zero preconditioning!
 

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Mine is a gen 2, one of the first ones. I notice on the energy display that the consumption is low on heating or a/c, like under 2kW but maybe it’s more for first few mins if the PTC kicks in.
Even if your PTC is working properly total power consumption of PTC/Heat pump will typically only go above 2kW for a short time. Even in below freezing conditions mine settles down to about 1-1.5kW at most once the cabin is warm.

To see the power split between PTC and Heat pump use Leafspy on the screen with the horizontal bar graph. "Hetr" is the PTC heater, "A/C" is the heat pump. (Even when it is working in heating mode, which Leafspy does not distinguish)
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Was this with the car turned on or timed/remote preconditioning?

Preconditioning, plugged in or unplugged does not use the heat pump only the PTC heater. So if your PTC heater was faulty, zero preconditioning!
This was with the car turned on. It was very cold, about -2 degC. I'm aware that preconditioning only uses PTC.

Mine is a gen 2, one of the first ones. I notice on the energy display that the consumption is low on heating or a/c, like under 2kW but maybe it’s more for first few mins if the PTC kicks in.
Ah cool, my gen2 Leaf is dated January 2014 which I thought was one of the earliest gen2 models, it has a cream interior. Obviously they started the gen2 sometime in late 2013.

Correct, the power draw will be above 3kW when you first turn it on a cold morning. The heat pump can draw a maximum of about 1.5kW, anything above this is the PTC.

Ah yes, that's a good trick if you have Leafspy
 

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This was with the car turned on. It was very cold, about -2 degC. I'm aware that preconditioning only uses PTC.
The weird thing is if reports on other forums are to be believed, US market Leaf's do use the heat pump when preconditioning from battery. (But not AC) That suggests it's a market specific dealer configurable option buried in the diagnostic tool somewhere...
 

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Is it worth using a used part for this job if getting someone to do it for you, since it looks to me like the labour cost takes up most of the cost? (I'd be afraid the used part would go kaput too)

Having googled a bit on this it appears to be a common fault where there are extreme low temperatures like -30 celcius in parts of Canada, USA, so fingers crossed it doesn't become common this part of the world!

Some have the theory it's the extensive use of preconditioning puts the heater under too much strain, so I think I'll stop using that feature.
 

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Is it worth using a used part for this job if getting someone to do it for you, since it looks to me like the labour cost takes up most of the cost? (I'd be afraid the used part would go kaput too)

Having googled a bit on this it appears to be a common fault where there are extreme low temperatures like -30 celcius in parts of Canada, USA, so fingers crossed it doesn't become common this part of the world!

Some have the theory it's the extensive use of preconditioning puts the heater under too much strain, so I think I'll stop using that feature.
Heat pumps don't work at -30C - in temperatures below approx -15C the PTC heater will be providing all the heat! (Which is one reason heat pump EV's still have PTC heaters as well)

So not preconditioning is not going to help you stress the PTC heater less in very cold conditions.
 

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I've recently replaced the PTC heater on our 2014 Gen2 (UK built AZE0. I couldn't find any info about how to do the job for right-hand-drive vehicles. Some reports suggested the whole dash may need to be removed*, I managed to do it without removing the whole dash. It was a bit tight, but possible.

*apparently, removing the whole dash is easier than the way I did it! Although, to me this sounds like a lot of extra work.

Here's a video of how I did it, hopefully this could be useful to someone in the future:


Here's a photo album of the job: Nissan LEAF PTC Heater Replacement

This car is a Gen2 AZE0 Acenta which has both a heat pump ant PTC heater, the PTC is used to provide instant powerful heat, while the heat pump is used to efficiently maintain cabin temperature. Only the PTC heater is used during cabin pre-heating and the heat pump does not function very well in sub-zero temperatures, therefore a faulty PTC heater causes significant issues when trying to heat and defrost the car in winter.

I replaced the PTC heater unit with a 2nd hand unit that cost £250.
  • Faulty PTC part number: 27143-3NF0B. Measured 1.9M ohm resistance, indicate fault?
  • Replacement (2nd hand) PTC part number: 27143-3NF1A. Measured 5 Mega Ohms across HV terminals

Knowledge of high voltage DC safe working procedures essential, 400V DC is serious

HV power down procedure:
  • Turn off car - Wait 10min
  • Disconnect 12V battery
  • Remove HV service disconnect using class 0 HV protection gloves
  • Disconnect PTC heater connector from battery pack using class 0 HV protection gloves

I take no responsibility, seek professional advice before undertaking any work
Hi

Do you still have the failed PTC? we're a company that make aftermarket parts for vehicles and we're looking at providing an aftermarket version of this part which is high quality and low in price. so would be ideal for our research to open a failed one up to see what has failed and why.

Thanks
 
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