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Just an impression: When I use Instavolt or Polar rapid chargers it seems that my battery temperature indicator collects an extra bar compared to a similar charge on an EH charger. Anyone else notice this?
 

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Entirely possible - EH chargers only run at 42-44kW, whereas Instavolt chargers can run at the full 50kW. The additional speed could well push the battery temperature higher.
 

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Entirely possible - EH chargers only run at 42-44kW, whereas Instavolt chargers can run at the full 50kW. The additional speed could well push the battery temperature higher.
Which is what I thought, and wondered about implications for battery life.
 

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Cars are rated for 50kW so I wouldn't worry about battery life.

At the global level, EH with their 7/8ths Rapids are the exception to the norm.
 

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Entirely possible - EH chargers only run at 42-44kW, whereas Instavolt chargers can run at the full 50kW. The additional speed could well push the battery temperature higher.
I've not come across one that has delivered more than 47kw peak to my leaf since I've been using them every now and again
 

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Tried one in Bristol, skem, Guildford or such I think it was, and one in the Midlands on the way back from Bristol as well and all at or below 50% and not a hot battery
 

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Below 50% your battery voltage will only be about 360V, which at the max current of 125A is 45kW. I tried when my battery was warm, meaning it was willing to go full pelt up to about 90%. At that point the voltage was close to 400V, giving the 49kW.

Instavolt chargers max out at 125A. DBT chargers max out on Chademo at 106A.
 

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42k miles on public charging. Am I an expert yet?
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The new chargers do deliver power faster, yes, which does result in temperature increasing faster.

The big thing that forces temperature up though is running the battery right down to a low SOC and then rapid charging up to a high SOC.

The best approach to avoiding excessive heat build up in a long journey, that I have found, is to keep the battery between 25-80% and stop more frequently. The tricky thing is that with the newer chargers being faster, it’s much harder to judge getting back to the car in time to do so!
 
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