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This will be a controversial thread. However, the onus on protecting road users lies with road users. Good design helps, but the only reason for cyclists to be unsafe in those examples is that they, or more likely other road users, put them(selves) in danger. Not safe to pass? Then wait.
 

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So the cyclist is merely supposed to trust their life in that no one else will be “in a hurry?”
Top photo, there is a perfectly safe cycle path to the right, completely screened from the cars and lorries. They just need to share nicely with people on foot. The chances of a bicycle killing someone on foot in a collision are very low.
 

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Puma GTE > Suzuki Jimny > BMW Z4 > Cupra Leon ST
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This will be a controversial thread. However, the onus on protecting road users lies with road users. Good design helps, but the only reason for cyclists to be unsafe in those examples is that they, or more likely other road users, put them(selves) in danger. Not safe to pass? Then wait.
City planning is a crutial and often overlooked part of traffic safety.

And that goes to pedestrian, bicicle and car safety.
Cars, bicicles and pedestrians have their place on the city and I never understood the hate that the 2 wheels get...
 

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Most people are considerate, but there are always the idiots who disregard all rules on the road (whether on foot or wheel) and walk, ride or drive with no care for anyone else. No amount of planning will solve the problem of people being nobs. E.g. pedestrians not looking where they walk, headphones on unaware of surroundings. Cyclists jumping red lights, riding on paths. Vehicle drivers not giving adequate space to pedestrians or cyclists, jumping red lights. The list is likely endless. Short of not permitting people outside their dwellings I can't see how all the problems can be solved.
 

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On a rural road with no pavements near me, there is stretch of road with a right-hand bend with the right-hand edge of the road surface up against a steep bank. If a pedestrian is walking (as directed in the Highway Code) on the right-hand side of the road to face any oncoming traffic, they are hidden from any oncoming traffic until the very last moment, and because of the steep bank they cannot move to the side if an oncoming vehicle suddenly appears. As a result, the oncoming vehicle has to swerve into the middle of the road, directly into the path of any vehicle travelling in the same direction as the pedestrian.
 

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On a rural road with no pavements near me, there is stretch of road with a right-hand bend with the right-hand edge of the road surface up against a steep bank. If a pedestrian is walking (as directed in the Highway Code) on the right-hand side of the road to face any oncoming traffic, they are hidden from any oncoming traffic until the very last moment, and because of the steep bank they cannot move to the side if an oncoming vehicle suddenly appears. As a result, the oncoming vehicle has to swerve into the middle of the road, directly into the path of any vehicle travelling in the same direction as the pedestrian.
We have similar situations near us. When we're walking SWMBO insists that we walk on the 'wrong' side of the road, as she feels it is safer - there's no point in being legally correct if you're dead.

Having said that, I was always taught to adjust my speed so that I could easily stop within my line of sight, so if the motorist is speeding, then it's their poor driving that's at fault. Still doesn't help if someone's dead, though.
 

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In my city the council generously decided to install cycle and bus lanes on some main roads during the pandemic. Except that they only marked them on sections of road where there was deemed to be sufficient width, so in several places the lane just ends and the unsuspecting rider is now thrust back into motor traffic, at least some of whom will be furious that 'their' territory has been taken and given to 'the enemy' who haven't paid for the right to use it. This isn't by any means a universal attitude: I would say overall there are a lot more people cycling vs pre-pandemic and the general level of patience and actually obeying the law regarding interacting with cycles on the road have noticibly improved. What has been less edifying is the fast cyclists who go past stupidly close to me when riding a cargo bike.

The new council have as practically their first act vowed to remove at least one of these lanes and a pedestrianised area of a streeet used as outdoor seating for restaurants, and considering cancelling future cycleway schemes that were already funded and planned. Removing evening parking charges and putting in more parking spaces are also on the plans. They clearly think actively hindering active travel and encouraing inner city car use will go down well with their voters.
 

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So the cyclist is merely supposed to trust their life in that no one else will be “in a hurry?”
You do that every time you go through a junction where other traffic is on red light. Or everytime you traffic waits before joining a roundabout (that's a traffic device beyond the intellect of many Americans). Or when you use the brake pedal and the person behind doesn't hit you.

It's sort of how roads work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
You do that every time you go through a junction where other traffic is on red light. Or everytime you traffic waits before joining a roundabout (that's a traffic device beyond the intellect of many Americans). Or when you use the brake pedal and the person behind doesn't hit you.

It's sort of how roads work.
Oh? All your examples cite the safest course of action… so does cyclist taking the lane in the top picture fit the pattern?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
The consequences to the law-abidingly lane-following cyclist can be much more injurious than those consequences awaiting a motorist delaying briefly at a green light.
 

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The consequences to the law-abidingly lane-following cyclist can be much more injurious than those consequences awaiting a motorist delaying briefly at a green light.
Of course. But that wasn't the discussion, was it? We all have to place trust in complete strangers when we're on the road. That's whether driving through a traffic light junction, cycling through a pinch point, or using a pedestrian-priority crossing. That's life.
 
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