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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just wondering what the recommendation is for driving in snow in an EV. In an ICE is drive slowly in a high gear, but you can't do that when you don't have any gears! Any tips?
 

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Just wondering what the recommendation is for driving in snow in an EV. In an ICE is drive slowly in a high gear, but you can't do that when you don't have any gears! Any tips?
Drive slowly with a light foot.
The high gear thing is to limit the torque applied by people with lead feet. They will struggle with EVs unless the traction control can handle it.
 

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Maybe select Eco (in a Leaf) to limit the power. I've found mine to be very stable in snow, mainly due to the weight balance, I'd have thought.
 

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Drive carefully, don't try and get clever with modes or you'll trip over yourself. You're too busy concentrating on what you're doing that at some point you'll have forgotten you've changed modes or gear settings and you'll catch yourself out right when you don't want to.

The narrower tyres fitted to most EV's will cut through lying snow better than most modern cars.

I'd suggest that if you're that concerned that you'll find yourself out in the snow with no options, get some snow socks from Amazon and throw them in the boot. Or get snow rated all season tyres like Michelin Cross climates. Not sure if they do them in EV car size or not or if you'll like the effect on the range.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·

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2018 Nissan Leaf 40kWh Tekna - love it
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Don't drive a rwd in the snow, and yes, the leaf handles very well.
 

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I'd avoid B mode altogether in snow. Secret is leave huge spaces in front (& behind if poss), accelerate & decelerate super slowly, never brake or accelerate round bends, do all braking on the straights before arriving at a bend, and when braking, if I have cars behind me, I'll touch the brakes without actually applying them, to get the brake lights on & warn the guys behind to do the same, then a couple of seconds later I apply the real pressure to slow myself down. With luck they'll do an actual brake, earlier than I do, and so increase the gap between them & me which is often on the small side to begin with!. Reduces the chances of them rear-ending me. If you've ridden a motorcycle in rain & snow, you'll know the general plan!

And I run winter tyres from Nov to March appx, even in south of England. I see we have snow today, not that I'm going anywhere this year!
 

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Well I have just discovered that my Model 3 Performance is crap in the snow. The ABS works well and AWD helps but the wide, low profile tyres have very low traction, even worse than I expected. It is the first car I have had for many years for which I do not have a set of winter tyres on spare rims. Time to rectify that I think.
 

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They have difficulty going in straight lines. Ask BMW drivers?
My 3 series was surprisingly good in snow the stability control kept everything point the right direction very well. I was genuinely surprised how well it worked the first time I had to drive it in snow. The rub is that it did such a good job it's a real surprise on the few occasions when it doesn't cope. I could understand that might lead to overconfidence followed by a nasty surprise for that subset of the population who seem to feel immortal as soon as they climb inside a motorised steel box.
 

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Echoing the winter tyres thing. I've always invested in a cheap set of wheels off eBay for any car I had and put winter tyres on. Even if my car is crummy (my current one is) I have a thing for immaculate wheels so I'd always take them off for snow and put cheap alloys or steels on with winter tyres. Never struggled even with RWD automatics (Vauxhall Omegas)
 

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Good winter tyres and gentle acceleration/braking makes a massive difference to keeping control of your own car.

Assume all the drivers around you are on summer tyres and going to drive as if the road is dry and grippy. That encourages you to keep very big gaps, so giving you time to react safely when they lose control.

There are lots of other winter driving tips, but they are mostly finessing around the edges or learning how to get yourself out of trouble.

Learning how to get yourself out of trouble is also very important, but not quite as easy to learn without a demonstration followed by practice in a safe place. I'm very grateful to my dad for taking me to a big empty car park in the snow to learn about skid control when I was still a learner driver. It certainly saved my bacon both times I've been headed for the ditch in wintery weather (the first time was barely a week after our practice session) but learning from a professional instructor in an appropriate setting would have been much safer, and something I'd still like to do one day because I'm sure there's lots more I could learn from them.
 

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Make sure you use one that has the kit that the instructor can use a control on hydraulically controlled trainer wheels to lift corners of the car to reduce grip.

 

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Make sure you use one that has the kit that the instructor can use a control on hydraulically controlled trainer wheels to lift corners of the car to reduce grip.

A bit complex.

You don't need this kit to lose grip - merely enough speed and turning angle. :)
 
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