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Discussion Starter #1
When it became apparent the e-golf was real I started to get quite excited as life long VW owner. I love the leaf, but have been thinking about what next, and with rumours of 130 or even 150 miles the possibility of more range makes the golf attractive.

Originally I read somewhere the golf was to have a 25 or maybe even a 27 kWh battery. Now it's here, we know it has a 24.1 kWh battery and VW are claiming 12.7kWh/100km and 118 mile range.

No chance.

I think this is going to be VWs '124 miles' number!

Firstly, if you do the maths, at 12.7kWh/100km 118 miles is *all* of the battery. That won't be allowed! Also, as the battery beds in, 24.1kWh won't be available for long. So the 118 number is look less and less likely.

If you compare some of the other numbers... (golf / leaf)
Weight : 1510kg / 1493kg
Drag : 0.28 / 0.28
Tyre size : 205/55/16 / 205/55/16

... The cars appear equals. So where is the magic?

OK, to be fair VW are saying 80 to 118, but it's the big number that catches people's eye. In the real world, I would guess that people will achieve more-or-less the same mileage in the e-golf as they can in a leaf.

Bit of a shame really.
 

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I remember looking at the stats from the RAC future car challenge back in 2011 and being impressed how much more efficient the VW Golf electric prototype seemed to be compared to the Leaf.

There were two prototype golf electrics doing the route. 1st one used 10.1 kWh over the 57 mile route and the other used 12.1 kWh. Compare this to the four 1st gen leafs doing the route using 14.1, 14.3, 14.9, 15.6 kWh over the 57 miles and the Golf prototype seemed quite a bit more efficient.
Data from http://www.greencarguide.co.uk/features/see-2011-full-results/

Calculations based on the golfs with 24.1 kWh battery capacity would have managed to go 136 and 113 miles before running out whereas the Leafs with 24kwh battery capacity would have managed 97, 95, 91 and 87 miles before running out.....
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well, I look forward to getting behind the wheel of one to see. Currently I just don't see the difference. The cars are more-or-less the same weight, drag, power and battery size.

I generally have a round commute of 76 miles. It's far from flat, pretty much all motorway or A dual, and I usually average (with the heating off) 0.20kWh/mile. I can get it as low as 0.18kWh/mile if I concentrate. So on paper, if my leaf was new and I drove it like that until it stopped, I could have a real life range approx 130 miles, in a leaf 1.

There also the issue of battery ageing. This is fairly well understood now for leafs, but not VW. Will we see the same bedding in of the pack an loss of capacity?

What will be interesting to find out is where 12.7kWh/100km comes from and in what conditions it was recorded. I watched Fully Charged the other evening and Robert Lewelyn was heading down to this figure in town fairly easily it seemed. If it is a combined figure (which is fairly typical for them) it should be possible to shave 10-20%, and get down to 10kWh/100km or a theoretical range of all but 150 miles.... I may get 2 days out of a charge! ;-)

But... What have VW done? As I said, same size / weight / drag / battery / tyres etc. Better wheel bearings?
 

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I think that VW may be onto something with the paddles allowing you to select a 'coasting' option. HGV manufacturers have been adding this system for the last 10 years with something many call 'eco-roll', to make the most of the momentum of the vehicle. It has massively improved the fuel efficiency of these vehicles, so I imagine that this could be of great help in improving the range of a car too. Whether it works for all drivers is a different question entirely, as hypermiling is still going to be the best way to get the higher range, and that doesn't always work with 'normal' drivers.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
@Lee Dalton - yes, perhaps. Previously I had a VW Lupo '3L'. It was an import I registered over here as it was never a UK car.

It's was a 1.2 3cyl TDi with a automatic manual gearbox. In 'ECO' mode when you lifted off the throttle the ECU automatically depressed the clutch so the car would glide.

In ECO mode the car could achieve a combined economy figure of over 90 mpg, even at 10 years old and with over 100,000 miles on the clock.

I've not yet driven the e-up (or the XL1!), but looking at Charged Up episode the e-up has a zero regen glide mode.

This will help the golds economy but I would expect it to be perhaps 5%, not the 25%+ the golf is claiming on VW figures.

We will see!
 

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It's certainly interesting to watch the manufacturers add on these developments from years gone by to eek out every possible extra mile. 25% or 5% increase! it's still all down to the way you drive it at the end of the day.
And if you believe the Nissan leaf guys, their on board software has some of them doing 60 miles per kWh of electricity used, that's over 600 miles on a charge :D
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I'd be interested to know how some people are hacking the stats / figures in Carwings...

What I do know is on a 75 mile round trip commute I can average 5 miles / kWh on a good day in my leaf 1, and not hit Low Battery Warning. That's a lot better than 'book' and the Nissan official figures.

I look forward to trying the golf... ;-)
 

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I love the challenge of hitting, or beating the official figures. It's what makes driving fun for me, you can't speed anywhere these days, so this is my new fun :)
As for hacking car wings, they must do journeys down hill, then tow/trailer it to the top again. Otherwise I really don't see how it's possible.
 
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