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The E-Niro-First Edition has battery cooling via the heat pump.

Does the heat pump also warm the battery in cool conditions (NOT winter mode) to keep the battery pack at an optimal temperature and what is that temperature?
 

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Not that I'm aware of.
 

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I doubt it's needed. Soon as you start drawing current from large batterys they do generate their own heat (and a lot of it). I believe winter mode only kicks in somewhere below -5 anyhow (and how often do we get that in UK outside of Scotland?). The only thing you'll notice is the BMS protecting itself and limiting max power until it gets to temperature which will happen as you drive it (obviously motorway better!). A better question is will the heat from the motor (excess) go to the batterys too, and yes, I understand that is in the cooling loop in both models. The battery heater in the 4's main benefit is that in cold temperatures it'll allow faster "rapid" charging as it can heat the battery whilst charging to allow it to take more electrons earlier in the cycle (I think there are videos on this, but you'll see (in cold conditions) a peak of around 55kw on a FE and 76 on a 4 when it's cold). This is based on my reading/much reading of manuals.

The other thing is on preheat in "cold" below -5, it'll allow you optionally (winter mode) to have full power quickly after startup.

I will report back when I see the 4 using the winter mode this winter, I suspect I won't see it !
 

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Kona Electric, EU base with heat pump
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The 2kW electric-resistance battery heater in the similar Kona kicks in any any battery temp under 15°C when DC charging, a condition where energy is relatively plentiful. I'm not aware of the heat pump being used instead, or in addition to that. You can hear the coolant pump running if you listen carefully. The data can be tracked on Torque Pro.

As for battery losses heating the battery, I've estimated that to be 2% of the charging power, so for example at 47kW it's 940 watts.
 
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