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After a successful long trip back from France (about 680 miles) the Niro like us went into quarantine with about 35% charge. Two weeks finally passed and I charged the car overnight to 100% on a 7.5Kw charger. Having been used too seeing a forecast range of 284 miles on full charge since buying it in August, I'm somewhat perplexed it is now showing the range as 254. I guess the temperature might affect it but it hasn't been particularly cold in London - any idea on why there is such a drop?
 

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KIA Soul EV 64kWh
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The displayed range is based on number of factors including battery SOC, recent driving history & ambient. temperature. After a long high speed run your mi/kWh will lower than usual.
Nothing to worry about. Charge & drive as usual.
We never worried about these things in ICE cars because there was no big gauge telli g you how badly they performed eg 30% conversion efficiency if you're lucky!
 

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After a successful long trip back from France (about 680 miles) the Niro like us went into quarantine with about 35% charge. Two weeks finally passed and I charged the car overnight to 100% on a 7.5Kw charger. Having been used too seeing a forecast range of 284 miles on full charge since buying it in August, I'm somewhat perplexed it is now showing the range as 254. I guess the temperature might affect it but it hasn't been particularly cold in London - any idea on why there is such a drop?
Your current range of 254mi indicates 254/64=3.9mi/kWh. That's pretty good.
Your usual mileage is 284/64=4.4mi/kWh
 

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E-Niro 4
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Yeah I’d say that’s about right. It’s what I’m seeing at the moment based on my driving and weather conditions. As finchlean said, nothing to worry about and drive as normal.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks guys. I will see if some round two driving pushes it back up. To be honest, I've yet to get close to 4.4 mi/kWh on long (er) journeys.
 

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My 40 leaf GOM has dropped from 165 miles to 145 on a full charge this week.

It’s got to be temperature, I’ve also noticed that my SOC is lower at the end of a days driving even if I haven’t used the heater much.

And that my first couple of trips in the morning seems to swallow a disproportionately large amount of charge (which I’m guessing is jut because the battery is cold).

Time of year I guess!
 

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After a successful long trip back from France (about 680 miles) the Niro like us went into quarantine with about 35% charge. Two weeks finally passed and I charged the car overnight to 100% on a 7.5Kw charger. Having been used too seeing a forecast range of 284 miles on full charge since buying it in August, I'm somewhat perplexed it is now showing the range as 254. I guess the temperature might affect it but it hasn't been particularly cold in London - any idea on why there is such a drop?
Perhaps a stupid question, but why not top the car up to 50% before putting it into a two week quarantine? That would have been gentlest on the battery, and not especially inconvenient to do, I wouldn't think?
 

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Perhaps a stupid question, but why not top the car up to 50% before putting it into a two week quarantine? That would have been gentlest on the battery, and not especially inconvenient to do, I wouldn't think?
It's a stupid question indeed. Why would charging from 35 to 50% make any difference.
 

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It's a stupid question indeed. Why would charging from 35 to 50% make any difference.
Because lithium ion batteries stored near 50% degrade more slowly than batteries stored at some other number. Hence the off-cited practice of not charging above 80% or draining below 20%. This is true right up and down the scale. The effect gets magnified on the extremes, but it's there at other numbers too. After a ride I'll charge back up to 50%, and then wait until the last convenient moment before the next ride to charge higher than that.

Why do many cars have the option of only charging to only 50% if there's no value in doing so? So your "It's a stupid question indeed" tone is strange to me.
 

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The SOC to store the car is unrelated to the practice of max charging in the normal use case.

It seems almost logical to connect them except one is a SOC to have the minimum degradation during storage, the other is minimum degradation during charge.... similar but different.

Greg
 

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The SOC to store the car is unrelated to the practice of max charging in the normal use case.

It seems almost logical to connect them except one is a SOC to have the minimum degradation during storage, the other is minimum degradation during charge.... similar but different.

Greg
Major electric bicycle brands (Shimano, Bosch, probably others) recommend that e-bike lithium batteries be charged to 60% or so for storage, to allow the charge to drop a little but to nonetheless remain close to the 50% zone. Is the same not recommended for electric cars?
 

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Major electric bicycle brands (Shimano, Bosch, probably others) recommend that e-bike lithium batteries be charged to 60% or so for storage, to allow the charge to drop a little but to nonetheless remain close to the 50% zone. Is the same not recommended for electric cars?
That sounds like good practice. With small batteries the parasitic drain will reduce the SOC to a much lower level. Large car batteries with the same parasitic current will take a very long time to drop a significant amount.
Hence different protocols for different batteries. My ThinkPad has a battery Conservation mode which maintains the SOC at 60%
 

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Instead of getting information from a bicycle company that does not make the batteries, why not get the information from the manufacturer?

There already was a big hullabaloo about the batteries from a different manufacturer, no longer LG, but SK industries..

Different battery, different manufacturer, different amp hours, different packaging, different charging system...

Greg
 

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Instead of getting information from a bicycle company that does not make the batteries, why not get the information from the manufacturer?

There already was a big hullabaloo about the batteries from a different manufacturer, no longer LG, but SK industries..

Different battery, different manufacturer, different amp hours, different packaging, different charging system...

Greg
My understanding didn't come from bicycle manufacturers, it came from lithium-ion battery best practices (as I understood them), and I used e-bike batteries as an example.

Are you saying there's absolutely no value to storing an e-car at 50% vs. 35%? There are e-cars that have the ability to let you charge it up to 50%, and then leave it there. I doubt any car manufacturer would recommend it be charged to 50% and then driven lower, when it could instead be charged a little higher (say 60%). Charging it to 60% and draining to 40% would be better than charging it to 50% and then draining it to 30%, presumably. So I took that 50% charge option as a way to get it to an ideal storage level.

But if you have additional information, I'm all ears.
 

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So why didn't you say that instead of referencing a bicycle manufacturer who did not make the battery?
It was a specific example off the top of my head. Setting my example aside, do you have any information of your own to provide? I just read up on it a bunch on Battery University, and they recommend storage between 40% and 50% for lithium ion batteries in general. If you have specific information to the contrary though, I'd love to read it.
 

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Aww jeeze here we go again... lots of posts and arguments on this.

Read the other threads/posts first, read on the other forums. Read the specific information on this specific battery pack. Read the (awful) Kia manual and see if you can decode some of the specific battery related stuff that is so poorly translated.

Yes I do, but have already gone round and round with the "experts" here and the 3 other Kia forums I frequent.

I'll come back in to give my information after you get done reading.

Let me give you a hint, you will be knowledgeable when you realize that "Battery University" is actually "Battery Kindergarten" and you can point out the errors on that site. When you can do that, then we can go forwards from there, then I have something to add that is not on every single electric car forum.

I completely understand wanting a simple set of rules on how to treat your battery, but the forums are polluted with "well this works on my bicycle, isn't my car the exact same situation"... no it is not.

Greg
 

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Aww jeeze here we go again... lots of posts and arguments on this.

Read the other threads/posts first, read on the other forums. Read the specific information on this specific battery pack. Read the (awful) Kia manual and see if you can decode some of the specific battery related stuff that is so poorly translated.

Yes I do, but have already gone round and round with the "experts" here and the 3 other Kia forums I frequent.

I'll come back in to give my information after you get done reading.

Let me give you a hint, you will be knowledgeable when you realize that "Battery University" is actually "Battery Kindergarten" and you can point out the errors on that site. When you can do that, then we can go forwards from there, then I have something to add that is not on every single electric car forum.

I completely understand wanting a simple set of rules on how to treat your battery, but the forums are polluted with "well this works on my bicycle, isn't my car the exact same situation"... no it is not.

Greg
You sound very triggered. If you're frustrated by this kind of thread, then why reply at all? Especially when your reply is to express your frustration with this kind of thread, and to promise that you have all sorts of great information that is beneath you to share, unless and until everyone in thread has spent however many dozens of hours doing research that you demand they do first?

Honestly, your tone is amazingly and unnecessarily unfriendly. Don't reply at all if you get too frustrated reading us new EV owners trying to figure things out, despite your acknowledgement that the information provided by the manufacturer even is of little help.
 

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New EV owners are great. New EV owners that start arguing about things they know little about is not great.

Read and learn first, read what others have written who have done the research.

Then you can talk about the parallels to bicycle batteries.
 
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