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My Leaf is fitted with Michelin Eco tyres which I thought were the best low energy tyres available. Imagine my surprise when looking at my favourite suppliers website they are only B rated for economy. The bridgestone http://www.mytyres.co.uk/cgi-bin/rs...m_s=3&rsmFahrzeugart=ALL&search_tool=standard On the other hand is A rated and also A rated for wet grip. If you want winter tyres then nothing better than C for economy.
 

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My friend recently had quickfit swap his wheels around and put nitrogen in them. Quick job except they ripped the exhaust off his MG 260. Two hous later he went out with nitrogen in in tyres. The thought is that the tyres let oxygen through but not nitrogen, so surely after a few pump ups you should have higher concentration of nitrogen in the tyres as the oxygen will have passed through.
I place greater immportance on pressures. I run most of my EVs at 35psi, but the Berlingo electriques, with Commercial tyres I run at 50psi, well within their spec. That makes an enormous difference. The commercial tyres also tend to be stiffer anyway.
For the Citroen C1s most had Michelin Eco and they just dont wear out. Except that the front tracking drifts as the rubber bushes wear and tracking changes. Keeping tracking correct has a big impact, but many tyre shops use over complicated 4 wheel syatems that dont really work well, or should I say the operatives dont relly understand what they are doing. Bring back the use of simple dunlop optical devices. So find a good garage that can check and adjust front tracking well, quickly and reasonably cheaply, and do it regularly.
As with all things its a compromise. I have Conti premuium on my converted Smart and they are brilliant, the car is light and the wear has been minimal. It just has so little weight .
 

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Sorry @Salopian I was being a bit facetious.

As QDOS points out, most of the atmosphere is Nitrogen (78%). So inflating your tyres with pure Nitrogen does little than remove Oxygen. Bulk Nitrogen is very cheap (it's a by-product of making pure industrial Oxygen), so it's a fairly easy money spinner for the tyre companies.

Here are the claims:
http://www.getnitrogen.org/sub.php?view=getTheFacts&subpage=reduceOxygen

I never have noticed the steel belts fail, or alloy wheels oxides away until either the tyres are cracked with age, or the wheels are 10 years old and heavily curbed.

The other thing is a lot of people will drive to a local garage to fill their tyres. Effectively they have heated up the tyres before they even get there, so they are under filled anyway ;)

YMMV
 

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Makes me smile when you think of the number of superheroes who end up underwater, with their cars, and suck on a tyre valve to survive whilst a hail of bullets blazes nearer to the surface...

Their tyres cannot be nitrogen filled ... :p
I carry a scuba cylinder with me for those occasions.

The "footwell" in the boot of a Model S is the perfect size :eek:

Vehicle Trunk Auto part Car City car
 

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When buying tyres I normally check new tread depth as part of the decision process. I found once a 4mm difference between a high price Michelin and a budget brand X. I made the mistake of buying the Brand X, and had to replace them at around half the mileage I had previously covered on the factory fit Michelins.
AS for Nitrogen, I would suggest that only some low quality tyres would benefit, the decent makes are already 'air tight'. A component of tyres since the mid 1960's has reduced oxygen bleed. Remember the red cycle inner tubes that needed pumping up every few days, and the black ones that stay inflated for months. The same change took place in car tyres. Look at a car drivers manual from the 1960's and earlier, it will recommend daily pressure checks. Now they are out to weekly or monthly. A good tyre will keep its pressure for months. Buying Nitrogen top ups is nonsense.
 

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When buying tyres I normally check new tread depth as part of the decision process. I found once a 4mm difference between a high price Michelin and a budget brand X. I made the mistake of buying the Brand X, and had to replace them at around half the mileage I had previously covered on the factory fit Michelins
I used to use A048 semi slicks on my old car (they were OEM supplied). They came with 5mm tread from new, where generally 8mm is normal.

You could easily get through a set of rears in < 4000 miles :eek: They were awesomely sticky when warmed up though :D
 

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Nitrogen inhibits aluminium corrosion of the rim & beading surface where hairline cracks develop in the lacquer with age.
Lack of oxygen inhibits aluminium corrosion ;)

But it does depend how long you keep the car. My dad's Lexus started getting corrosion related slow punctures... saying that it was 25 years old.

I've never had any issues using regular air on cars with alloys. My Lotus is 11 years old, still on original wheels only ever filled with air. Still hold pressure like the day they were new.
 

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A little over inflation never hurt anyone. I used to swear by Michelin energy tyres. They made a big difference to my diesel Renault clclips economy (58 mpg whatever I did to it) and I always put them on subsequent cars. However I found some yokohama blue earth eco ones, and they were excellent too, with the added bonus of being exceptionally quiet.

I find all low rolling resistance tyres have very low wear rates as a feature of their composition.

It also goes on cost. I just had an unrepaorable slow puncture through glass damage to the rear tyre of our czero. A each or normal.eco brands found nothing cheaper than around 60 quid each. Out of interest I googled the original spec tyres - Dunlop Enasave - and found a nearby supplier at 36 quid each !! I quickly snapped up a pair. ......

They may not be the ultimate but at that price.im not complaining
 

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Oddly, tried to order replacement Michelin Energy Saver + tyres from the local dealer I got them from a year and a half ago - no longer available through this dealer!

Seem to have found a local supplier to get them from at £65 fitted. Lasting me 30,000 miles per set

Noticed the new Leaf in the showroom has Dunlop tyres. Is a larger rim , at R17 versus my R16 - any thoughts?
 

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My Leaf Tekna has 17 inch wheels and came with Dunlop Enasaves when new.

Tyres for the 17 inch wheel tend to cost more than double those of the 16 incher.

Almost 22,000 miles now and the two offside tyres are badly worn.

Will replace them with two new fronts, and place the still good nearside tyres on the rear.
 

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The whole issue of tyres is just so complex. Its all about compromise. Decent life/ Decent grip/ decent mileage. Different tyres are made for different markets, ie the same tyre made for hot climates will be different from here or scandinavia, a UK soft compound tyre would be virtually useless in the middle east. But the ones destined for the middle east would probably have no grip and last forever here.
Then factor in driving style and your expectations of ride quality / road noise, and it gets even more complex. Some cars just work better on a certain variation of tyre, and the same tyre on another car will be less than good. Even a few PSI extra can transform the way a tyre works, but then chuck in grandma and the kids into the car and it all changes again.
The original fitment on most cars is driven by supply and price v specification and all makers generally have two or three suppliers to ensure availability.(yes there are exceptions)
Find a tyre version / brand you like for your needs, and go with them. I personally like continentals, and have vehicles with Premium and Eco versions, I hate MIchelin ECO tyres (and light van tyres) because they are so badly impacted upon by UV/ Sunlight, I have seen dozens on cars that are so badly cracked as to need changing, but have only done a few thousand miles. I dont see that on the Continentals.
 
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