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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Eco-vehicles fill air with deadly toxins - sadly behind the Times paywall, so cut and pasted below.

Original paper here - ScienceDirect - Choose Organization

The Times said:
Scientists have found electric, hybrid and other supposedly eco-friendly cars produce as much toxic particulate pollution as the “deadly diesels” they are meant to be replacing.

The tiny particles are produced by tyre and brake wear. This happens in all cars, including diesel and petrol, but eco-vehicles produce more because they are heavier, owing to the batteries and other parts needed to propel them. The extra emissions are roughly equal to the particulates saved by reduced engine use.

The added weight of eco-cars means that when they accelerate or slow down, the tyres and brakes wear faster, producing more particulates. The weight also whips up more particles from the road surface.

“We found that non-exhaust emissions, from brakes, tyres and the road, are far larger than exhaust emissions in all modern cars,” said Peter Achten, whose research is published in the journal Atmospheric Environment.

“These are more toxic than emissions from modern engines so they are likely to be key factors in the extra heart attacks, strokes and asthma attacks seen when air pollution levels surge.”

Achten, who runs a scientific consultancy in Holland, and his co-author Victor Timmers, of Edinburgh University, used technical data from the motor industry and government research agencies, including direct tests of brake, tyre and road wear rates, to show that the non-exhaust emissions produced by a vehicle are directly related to its weight. They also built a database of vehicle weights.

“We found that electric and eco-friendly cars typically weigh 24% more than conventional cars,” said Achten.

The findings fit with anecdotal complaints from electric and hybrid car owners that their tyres wear out faster than on conventional vehicles.

The impact of non-exhaust emissions has long been suspected but is hard to measure. Scientists at Hertfordshire University overcame this problem by installing particulate air pollution monitors in the southbound Hatfield tunnel on the A1(M), which carries up to 49,000 vehicles a day.

They found each vehicle produced 34-39 micrograms of particles per kilometre but only a third came from the engine.

The rest comprised mainly tiny pieces of bitumen whipped up from the road, rubber from tyres and brake dust. In towns — where cars brake and accelerate more often — this proportion may reach 90%.

Such findings are a problem for policy-makers whose anti-pollution efforts have been focused on regulating engines. Professor Ranjeet Sokhi, of Hertfordshire University, who led the study, said: “This highlights the significance of non-exhaust emissions and a need for legislation.”

The Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders said the industry was working to make eco-friendly cars lighter. “Such vehicles have zero or ultra-low tailpipe emissions and have energy recovery systems, which limit the need for active braking, reducing brake and tyre friction that may contribute to particulate emissions.”

Toyota, a market leader in hybrid, plug-in hybrid and fuel-cell cars, said the firm had no data on particulate emissions from brakes and tyres but added: “An advantage of hybrid cars over diesel is that nitrogen dioxide and hydrocarbon emissions are incomparably better.”

Frank Kelly, professor of environmental health at King’s College London, said one hope lay in changing the composition of tyres and road surfaces. “Non-exhaust PM [particulate matter] emissions are greater than exhaust and we do not have regulations to deal with these emissions.”

A Department for Transport spokesman said eco-vehicles still had huge benefits in cutting CO2 emissions.

@jonathan__leake
Interesting, but sadly a false, attention grabbing headline and a dubious study.

The air quality complaints are all generally about air quality in towns, where speeds are lower and most pollution is in fact from vehicles idling.

Yet these guys decided to do the analysis on the A1(M) with vehicles doing higher speeds with higher wear on tyres etc.

I wonder who funds this research... ?
 
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The bias is obvious in the first sentence.

"Scientists have found electric, hybrid and other supposedly eco-friendly cars produce as much toxic particulate pollution as the “deadly diesels” they are meant to be replacing."

Not only that but the brakes on my Leaf have lasted considerably longer than any other car I own thanks to regenerative braking, which doesn't consume any brake pad material. The tyres seem about the same so no difference there. If it smells like something, and looks like something, it usually is that something ;-)
 

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Always good to have research done. Hopefully it will be good factual peer reviewed papers (they seem to be running a consultancy as well so not sure of any conflict of interest). I would question the particles from the brakes. The vast majority of slowing down in my Leaf is regenerative braking. This is not mentioned in the above. There is also the possibility of having pure electrical braking. This also points to more research needed for all car tyres not just EV's.

Richard
 
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I'm not crazy, the attack has begun.
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This is a very odd paper.

It seems to have falsely conjoined two correct statements together to conclude a false corollary.

Namely;
- Heavier vehicles produce more non-emissions particulates.
and
- EVs are heavier than conventional cars

What is missing is;-
- Heavier vehicles that are otherwise identical produce more non-emissions particulates.

Obviously, an EV has the potential for (and as we know often achieves) virtually no brake wear.

What concerns me is that I cannot find any academic listing for a Victor Timmers in Uni Edinburgh's list of academics, and it is atypical for a 'scientific paper' to have only one further, industry, author. If it was a sponsored project you'd expect a gaggle of principal and junior researchers.

I'll make some enquiries ......
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
The paper is included in this article collecting many together.

"EVs were the best alternative to diesel and gasoline vehicles across all categories. EVs have no exhaust emissions and reduced non-exhaust pollutants as well as low electricity generation associated emissions. Hooftman et al.concluded that EVs tend to emit up to eight times less non-exhaust PM than diesel vehicles and at least two times less than gasoline powertrains—findings at opposition with some of the earlier studies on the topic."

http://www.greencarcongress.com/.../20160502-nonehaust.html
 
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Discussion Starter #8
What concerns me is that I cannot find any academic listing for a Victor Timmers in Uni Edinburgh's list of academics, and it is atypical for a 'scientific paper' to have only one further, industry, author. If it was a sponsored project you'd expect a gaggle of principal and junior researchers.
You don't have to enquire far.

LinkedIn will tell you that Victor Timmers is doing a BEng at Edinburgh graduating in 2017.
He did an internship at this consultancy company in what would have been his second year when this paper was produced.

Hmmm...
 
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I'm not crazy, the attack has begun.
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Yes, I noticed there was a linkedin behind a login (I've been meaning to join linkedin for the last decade).

OK, I will report.
 

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Hmmm, yes, more particulates from the breaking. That'd be the regenerative breaking, would it? My last Prius had to have its break pads replaced... after 75,000 miles. Would an Insignia or a Passat manage that?

Wonder who commissioned this survey.
 

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Such silliness, disappointed in the Times, seems more Daily Mail?

It's spin / almost trolling as it makes no technical sense - everywhere I read about EV's people are suggesting their brakes never wear due to regen braking. Regarding the tyres I enjoyed the "anecdotal complaints from electric and hybrid car owners" reference - the cornerstone of every robust academic theory that is anecdotal evidence ....

When I ordered my Tesla I was surprised that it actually only weighs 150kg more than my current Audi A6 so I doubt in my case the tyre wear will be significantly different unless I drive it like a maniac .........

From what I can see this was written by the Faculty of Stupid for the consumption of people who are in Denial.

I'm still driving a diesel while I wait for my EV to be delivered, but at least I feel guilty about it ... lol

Cowabunga,

Jolltax
 

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Hi this is something I discussed on Twitter a few days ago. One user pointed out the company behind the research is a developer of internal combustion engine technology and I checked and they are also from Holland which is looking to ban the sales of diesel and petrol cars from 2025. Hardly unbiased research. It was about the fact that EV vehicles are generally heavier than the ICE counterpart leading to extra tyre wear and scrubbing off the road of particle matter, but as I pointed out the particle matter comes from Diesel engines. And usually EV's are fitted with low resistance tyres anyway
 

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Clearly this is important and well researched information and we need to address this with an equally solid scientific fact-based response.


I am sure we are all horrified by the vast amounts of rubber and brake dust we are emitting from our EV’s.


Anyone will surely soon understand that a 1500kg EV will emit say 90% more rubber than a 2 ton diesel 4x4, and as such will be lethal to following traffic.


In order to prevent further damage to the environment I have immediately changed my lethal braking system to a go-kart style stick of wood that I poke through a hole in the floor-pan to interface with the tarmac responsibly. My brake dust emissions have since dropped to zero!


Further to this, after consulting the scientist who performed the particulate analysis (Arfur) I have now acted upon his recommendations and wrapped my polluting tyres with 10mm of sausage-meat. Although expensive and time-consuming, this has replaced the rubber pollution with environmentally friendly pork and beef (quorn on the spare).


The brakes take a little longer to stop the car from 30mph (about 3km) but are just ok. The sausage-meat tyres though are a revelation. Quiet and energy efficient, as they warm up they leave behind a wonderful aroma as well as no rubber.


My only problem is that when driving around town I am now followed by 20 or 30 various dogs who seem to be inexplicably attracted to the car.


Please, like me, make sure that any solutions you implement are, like mine, as well researched as the original article.
 

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LinkedIn will tell you that Victor Timmers is doing a BEng at Edinburgh graduating in 2017.
He did an internship at this consultancy company in what would have been his second year when this paper was produced.

Good grief.
 

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The End Times are fast approaching, the last desperate arguments flung out in a pathetic attempt to forestall the inevitable.
 

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LinkedIn will tell you that Victor Timmers is doing a BEng at Edinburgh graduating in 2017.
Fair play then, I wrote all kinds of cobblers when I was at University - the difference being my drunken ramblings didn't end up in the press, lol

EDIT : Wait ....we use square brackets for the bbcode, wtf, lol
 

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Anyone on here signed up to the Times willing to write a letter to them pointing out what a load of cobblers this article is? Or can we not be bothered?
 

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I'm a tad confused by the conclusion here.

Would I be right in saying that they've measured the non-exhaust particulate emissions from various cars, calculated how weight affects these numbers, and then concluded that as EVs and hybrids are on average '24% heavier' they must produce 24% more of these emissions?

Seems a bit of a jump...

Or have they actually got figures for a range of vehicles and a range of fuel types?
 
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