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Are most owners using the above if charging at home?

I've done a small amount of research but, it mentioned higher day tariffs. Also suggested using everything with timers i.e. washing machines, tumble dryers etc so they switch on during the 7 cycle. Lastly I've checked my meter and that would also need replacing. Just seems like so much hassle to maybe save not a lot:confused:
 

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I am, but already had it (sort of got it by default). Don't bother with timers on appliances - am not tight enough to bother!
 

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Yes, we switched to E7 when we got the Leaf. We also put everything we can on timers. I think it is worthwhile doing as much as possible overnight.

Wouldn't go back.
 

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My day rate is only 12p so not that much more expensive than single rate. Night is 5p. as I now have solar panels the day usage is minimal now anyway but doesn't stop us using washing machine etc in day as even with that 75% of my usage is at night due to driving about 30 miles a day and charging at night.
 

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Hi, being a new EV owner, I have also thought about switching to E7, when you read through the literature on the Eon website, it advises to only proceed if you have Storage Heaters, is owning an EV the equivalent of Storage Heater or worse? As luck would have it I am currently on the Eon v9 1 year standard tariff which reading I believe is the cheapest E7 tariff by a mile and even the high rate tariff on this is only 0.5p more expensive then the standard one.

Questions I have,

do you think Eon would let me to switch to E7 version as I'm on it already? (have a feeling the answer might be no)

next year if I wanted to return to standard tariff, I have been told by someone at work that energy company would then just switch of one of the clocks, so it would be quite easy.

The other question is, if I have Solar PV wouldn't that interfere with the daytime tariff?
 

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You need a multi rate meter. You can ask your current supplier to install one and switch you to e7 tariff. Npower have happily done this for me.
They try taking you through calculations and tell you it won't save you money but they don't have electric cars in their cost models.
My annual usage is about 3000 kwh night and 2200 kwh day. That's driving 10k miles per year. Put that into uswitch and specify you have e7 meter to find best supplier for pricing that usage. Some have lower night but higher day and you need to find best balance.
Also they rarely know what times the e7 will apply as that's down to the DNO when installing your multi rate meter. They like to vary times to balance out demand
 

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This is the E7 map with times I extracted from my Scottish Power web site.

Economy 7 timings vary depending on supply area, which is why we encourage customers to contact their local meter operator to check the exact timing for their supply. The map shows timings dependant on the area you live in.


Area Area Name Normal E7 off peak times (GMT)
10 Eastern England 23:00 - 07:00
11 East Midlands 00:30 - 07:30
12 London No standard off-peak, but off-peak will normally run for 7 hours at some point from 23:00 - 07:00
13 Merseyside and North Wales 00:30 - 07:30
14 West Midlands 00:00 - 07:00
15 North East England 00:00 - 07:00 or 00:30 - 07:30
16 North West 00:30 - 07:30
17 North Scotland 23:30 - 07:30
18 South Scotland 23:00 - 07:30
19 South East England 22:30 - 00:30 and 02:30 - 07:30
20 Southern England 23:30 - 06:30 or 00:30 - 07:30
21 South Wales Can vary
22 South West Can vary
23 Yorkshire 00:00 - 07:00 or 00:30 - 07:30
 

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I switched to E7 with a meter change just over a month ago. Meter change cost 66.15 with my provider, but the savings have worked out about 50p/day to date. I thought originally the payback would be 8-9 months (didn't have seperate EV metering so guessed), but it's looking more like under 5 now.
 

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I switched to E7 with a meter change just over a month ago. Meter change cost 66.15 with my provider, but the savings have worked out about 50p/day to date. I thought originally the payback would be 8-9 months (didn't have seperate EV metering so guessed), but it's looking more like under 5 now.
Which supplier was that... I would have switched supplier and the requested e7 if that was their cost!
 

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Questions I have,

do you think Eon would let me to switch to E7 version as I'm on it already? (have a feeling the answer might be no)

next year if I wanted to return to standard tariff, I have been told by someone at work that energy company would then just switch of one of the clocks, so it would be quite easy.

The other question is, if I have Solar PV wouldn't that interfere with the daytime tariff?
Most companies will let you switch to E7 on the rates that were on offer when you entered your contract. That would be very favourable for you on the Eon v9 tariff. (They pulled it before I could sign up).

If you want to return to standard tariff, that's straight forward – you still supply two readings but they are both charged at standard rate.

Solar PV wouldn't interfere with your daytime rate. It works to your advantage because you use your self-generated power first, saving you from buying more expensive kWh from the grid. You receive your feed in tariff and export payments just the same, regardless of which tariff/supplier/etc. you're with.
 

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Coop Energy. I went into a 12 month tie-in before deciding to buy an EV. Personally I didn't have a problem paying if I could see definite savings.
 

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In answer to the OP, I'm in the process of switching to E7, waiting for the meter board to be replaced before they can fit the new two rate meter.

Our washing machine and dishwasher both have delayed start timers, which we will use when we have E7.

We will charge the car at the off peak rate. Unfortunately our EV doesn't have a charging timer so I will have to go out to the garage and plug it in when the off peak rates start. :(
 

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In answer to the OP, I'm in the process of switching to E7, waiting for the meter board to be replaced before they can fit the new two rate meter.

Our washing machine and dishwasher both have delayed start timers, which we will use when we have E7.

We will charge the car at the off peak rate. Unfortunately our EV doesn't have a charging timer so I will have to go out to the garage and plug it in when the off peak rates start. :(
May I suggest you have a timer to save you the bother. It is possible to have the supplier switch on off peak circuits in many areas but the disadvantage is that you could only use your charge-point at night.
 

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Which supplier was that... I would have switched supplier and the requested e7 if that was their cost!
Why not switch to one that does it for free. I was with SSE and no mention made of paying for meter swap after all they charge you a higher daily charge on E7. Npower used to be free, not sure now.
 

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I'm looking to switch to BG off peak savers tariff as i won't always be able to charge at night. It will save me money and I'll get the new smart meters installed.
 

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May I suggest you have a timer to save you the bother. It is possible to have the supplier switch on off peak circuits in many areas but the disadvantage is that you could only use your charge-point at night.
Thanks for the suggestion. That would require getting a contactor wired in, like for night storage heaters. I wouldn't want to lose the ability to top-up charge in peak hours – it could be too big a limitation some days.
 

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I've been on E7 for two weeks now. Cost £80 to get the meter changed, so will need to factor that into any savings.

Price-wise, my commute is now costing around £1.50/day, instead of around £4.00/day before E7 (or £17/day on diesel...). The day rate has gone up by 3p/kwh +VAT, but that has been offset by overnight savings.

Overall, it looks like the annual electricity costs will remain at the same level or slightly lower than they were before I got my EV. So, in that respect, I get a year of "free" miles.
 

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I inherited E7 hardware at my present address. It has a separate circuit for a storage heater that no-longer works. I think EDF were confused why my off-peak was so low. That said, the metering applies to all electricity used. The old fashioned electro-mechanical timer provides the switching for the storage heater circuit and the trigger for the meter to change rate.

Now, my lifestyle is very much timer-based so lots of things operate overnight. The car will use more than the storage heater used to but at the low rate that is fine. Just remember that you take a hit if you need to charge during the daytime rate. That will be down to individual circumstances.

Also it is possible to get too obsessed with E7 charging. If you occasionally want to do the washing or any other consumption activity during the day it is only pence. it only adds up when done on a regular basis. Of course the next goal is to put solar on the roof. Being only 1/4 mile from the sea the power of the sun is quite intense.

Enough for now. Must go and set the timer on the tumble dryer
 

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I am on Economy 10, with SSE. I get lower rates during the afternoon and evening as well as at night. My present bill, including sun power from the roof , works out at £1.30p per day. plus standing charge of 15.7ppd. . Washing machine and dishwasher already have timers built in so no effort there.
A small amount of effort can save a lot.
 
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