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In London they started off with the 507/521 “Red Arrow” routes which are short and operate most frequently at peak times (and not at all on Sundays). The home vase is at Waterloo which is also the terminus for both routes.
They seem to have been a considerable success so you can now find similar BYD/Alexander Dennis vehicles on the 360 and 153. The first double decks have just entered service on the 43 which is a major trunk route through North London so they must be fairly confident now!
 

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Welcome back to the future the Trolley-bus!



Clearly this is the way forwards - a combination of batteries for the majority of the route but overhead power in areas of high concentration to allow recharging. Surely modern technology can automate the connection of the pantograph / trolley-poles?

Germany are trialling a similar system for electric hybrid battery/overhead power lorries:

 

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Welcome back to the future the Trolley-bus!



Clearly this is the way forwards - a combination of batteries for the majority of the route but overhead power in areas of high concentration to allow recharging. Surely modern technology can automate the connection of the pantograph / trolley-poles?

Germany are trialling a similar system for electric hybrid battery/overhead power lorries:

Definitely an efficient way forward. You can have overheads on some straight bits of the bus route and use railway type pantographs like those trucks have and you can connect on the move.

Batteries only need to be enough to power the bus over the remainder of the route between overheads i.e. not all day. So each vehicle is much cheaper. Also you need less busses since you can run each one continuously if you have to.

Also no high power chargers needed to ultra rapid charge the bus in 6 minutes. Lots of fixed infrastructure in the overheads though.

All existing technology and easily doable.
 

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Proterra's highest-spec 40-seater Catalyst bus has a 660kWh battery rated at 232-328 miles, and can be replenished by 397kW overhead chargers at bus stops, delivering 31 miles' range in 10 minutes.

That sort of spec would be viable for a lot of routes. Don't necessarily need wires all over the place, just put them at the bus stops.
 

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That sort of spec would be viable for a lot of routes. Don't necessarily need wires all over the place, just put them at the bus stops.
The more buses on a given stretch the more it will be worth spending on infrastructure rather than big batteries; possibly to the extent of having no battery for some (per the trolley buses).
On very lightly used routes a long range battery bus might make better sense than having any on route charging.

A mix is almost inevitable, much as on the railways where electrified lines still host diesel powered trains.
 

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Quite simply, who will pay for the infrastructure? In the UK we have a deregulated market and there is no one to provide it, just lots of people to use it. On the railways they suffer huge issues with a very limited number of heavily regulated users (in terms of rail operators) damaging the infrastructure and preventing the rest using it - imagine the bus / HGV market of chancers messing up the infrastructure for the rest. If the overhead lines come down on the M1 what happens? It might work in London with TFL maintaining its own network and taking over all freight traffic (sounds like a Corbin wet dream), but out in the rest of the country .......? One itinerant vehicle from Outer Zongoland could banjax the network for the rest of the users creating total chaos.
 

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Actually, maybe a combination of old & new technology would be best:

How about a Giro bus which recharged the flywheel from an inductive pad under each bus stop?
 

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If you go to York and catch the bus from the city centre to Monks Cross chances are it'll be an electric bus. They charge them on CYC Chademos. They've had them several years now, but I have seen them parked up going nowhere and good old diesels running the service!
 

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However I am not yet convinced that electric buses are the way forward for a fleet of vehicles on fixed routes, likewise I am sure (not) that the policy has been thought fully through.
Why ever not? With fixed routes and known mileage the range of an EV bus can be matched to the needs of that route and since in general they don't run overnight, or at least there are far fewer running, then recharging from a central depot overnight (on cheaper electricty as well) is easy to plan.
 
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