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[Mod - feel free to move if in wrong section]

Interesting article from 2011 - http://www.sae.org/mags/aei/10440/
I didn't know that EV motors used a rare metal (every day is a school day) I assume this applies to Ampera
It also mentions another GM hybrid system.
 

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Discussion Starter #2

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Militant EV driver!
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The so-called rare metals aren't that rare, and pop up in lots of stuff.

There has been a lot of debate over whether the Volt used this or not. Squirrel cage type induction motors, as used by Tesla, don't. There is conflicting information out there about Volt. I wonder if we have one of each?

The point is, as Tesla proves, you don't need it for lightweight, high power motors.
 

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Clearly from the GM presentation the Ampera/Volt uses PM. If the costs of the materials is rising then it won't help bring EV prices down, unless more move to induction, but there appears to be some limitations.

Edit: It appears Tesla S also uses induction.
 

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Seems GM is committed to PM

General Motors will become the first American automotive manufacturer to build its own electric motors when production begins in White Marsh, Md., in late 2012. In promoting this capability, GM has released details of the first motor to be built there, the 85 kW (114 hp) permanent magnet motor to be used in the 2013 Chevrolet Spark EV.
 

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I've also seen GM material that says it uses induction. Go figure. I knew Spark uses PM though.

Other rare earth supplies are coming on stream now, just before the Chinese were undercutting everyone.
 
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