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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Moving house later on this week. Only going to be a temporary move for a year or so. LL doesn't want a charge point to be installed, so I'm left using a 3-pin charger.

Yesterday, we got the electrical condition report, shown in the photos below:

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I'm clueless with this stuff. Is there anything here to suggest it's not safe to use a 3-pin charger long-term?
 

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There's red things on there so the LL ought to get those fixed.

It's not easily readable. Can you have another go at photographing the report but with the pages flat and near a window so it's better lit?
 

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Seems to me that if someone has decided "Supplementary bonding conductors" are inadequate (last pic), the very least they could do is state where these are needed. Kitchen? Gge? Bathroom? Shower? Where? Same goes for the rest of the report, how on earth are you to know which particular items need the RCD fitting/improving/whatever?
 

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My guess is that the person doing the report would also do the work as well, Get the landlord on the case and find out when it will be made safe.
As an aside ask them if they would be willing to allow an external plug socket to be fitted if you paid the electrician for the parts while they are there doing the work anyway.
 

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There are significant safety failings highlighted on that report. You can ignore the C3s, they are primarily advisory, but the C2s are thing that need to be put right as soon as possible. Having said that, the person coding that EICR is somewhat of a zealot, as there are C2s that frankly should be C3s, in my view. For example, there's nothing in BS7671:2018, amendment 1, that stipulated that two way switching is even required, let alone a major defect if it's not working. At best that should be a C3.

Clearly the house has little or no earth leakage protection, not unusual for an older property. Although it's very desirable to have RCD protection on bathroom lights, there are millions of UK homes that don't have this, as it was perfectly legal to wire homes like this until the regs changed in about 1991, IIRC. There's never been a requirement to update an older installation to meet the latest standards, either, only ever a recommendation that this be done for enhanced safety. There used to be a category on the EICR specifically for this, C4, which was defined as an installation that was compliant with the regulations that applied at the time. Nowadays, C4s need to be coded as C3s, and I personally think that's wrong.

A new outdoor outlet, if one needs to be fitted, for charging an EV needs to comply with the requirements in BS7671:2018, amendment 1, though, and I would strongly recommend ensuring that there was some form of resettable RCD protection on any other outlet used for running a portable charge point, simply to provide a trip that needs to be manually reset, as an indicator there may have been a fault.

As it looks as if this installation may well be thirty or more years old (from the absence of RCD protection), and as drawing 10 A from an outlet for a long period of time can cause problems with older outlets and wiring, it would be wise to keep a wary eye on the plug for a time. Some portable charge points include plug temperature sensing, because of this concern, but a useful check is to monitor the plug temperature after the car has been charging for a few hours. It will get warm, perhaps to around 30°C or so, but if it shows signs of getting hot then that is an indication that all is not well with the outlet. Often, this sort of issue with an older outlet may not show up on an EICR. R1 +R2 will be measured, and that should give an indication of any plug connection that has a high resistance on the line pin, but equally, it's commonplace for the test plug to be inserted and removed a few times during testing to try and get the resistance down, and that practice can mask a contact spring that isn't making as reliable connection as it might.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'll try and sort some clearer photos later.

The property was built in 2000 or 2001, so some of the above is a little concerning :oops:

No chance of having a proper charger fitted; I already asked and the response was along the lines of "We don't see why we would want one fitted, as EVs aren't selling and it won't be of any use to future tenants".

The granny charger would be plugged in to a socket in the garage, possibly needing an extension lead (already know the score with these though). I'm just a little concerned that I might cause a fire...
 

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RCD protection came in with the 16th Edition of BS7671 around 1991, IIRC, and was then made more stringent with the 17th Edition around 2008. I don't still have a copy of the 16th Edition to hand (must have binned it when we moved house), but I thought that it included partial RCD protection, covering any outlet that was likely to be used to power something outdoors. RCD protection wasn't required on lighting circuits back then, I'm sure, so the absence of it on an EICR being done now can only be classed as a C3, not a C2.

In practice, 16th Edition consumer units usually had most, or all, of the power circuits protected by an RCD, and the lighting circuits not, although strictly speaking there was no requirement to use RCD protection on all power outlets, I think.

The fire risk is very low as long as the circuit and outlet used is in good condition. Warning signs that an outlet may already be starting to fail are when the area around the line socket (the one on the right looking at the outlet) shows signs of discolouration. It's almost always the line terminal that suffers, because of the heat from the fuse in the plug that gets conducted down the pin. This then causes the spring contact to lose some of its springiness, which in turn increases the contact resistance that in turn makes the pin hotter. As above, just monitoring the temperature of the plug for the first few hours is a good indicator as to whether there may be a potential issue.
 

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The ring final circuits 10+11 do have RCD protection according the table of test results.

more to point as the EICR was in January the C2, should be already corrected and a new EICR issued, consumer unit labelled with new test date etc

Remedial work
If the report shows that remedial work or further investigation is required, as set out above, landlords must complete this work within 28 days or any shorter period if specified as necessary in the report. Landlords must then provide written confirmation that the work has been carried out to their tenant and to the local authority within 28 days.
 

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It sounds like your LL is stubbornly in 'no' mode, but if you wanted to try one last time, you could push for a Commando socket or even just a 13A socket in the garage. At least a 13A would be of value to future tenants.
 

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My concern with a commando would be that, in order to be safe for use with a portable charge point that supports higher current charging, like the Tesla UMC or the Ohme, it needs to be an interlocked commando (don't want sparks and the risk of associated damage from pulling out a connector under heavy load) and also needs to comply with the requirements in Section 722 of amendment 1 to BS7671:2018. That's about as costly for the landlord as installing a charge point, and if one was installed that didn't comply then it would possibly get picked up at the next EICR (as well as possibly being an offence, as a breach of building regs if it was a new circuit).

A new 13 A outlet in the garage seems a reasonable request, and although, strictly speaking, it should also be installed in compliance with the requirements of Section 722, there is no real need to define it as an EV charging outlet - there are any number of good reasons for wanting power in a garage.
 

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If the place burns down 1) it’s not your house and 2) the landlord is insured anyway. There’s always another rental to move to, I see no problem here.
 

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If the place burns down 1) it’s not your house and 2) the landlord is insured anyway. There’s always another rental to move to, I see no problem here.
If I was asleep upstairs at the time I might consider it a problem - if I ever woke up.
But each to their own I guess :rolleyes:
 

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Assuming said landlord has installed a functional smoke alarm may actually have been a stretch, given the state of the wiring...

I think the conclusion is move out to somewhere that isn't a fire hazard run by a d*ckhead?
 
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I get the feeling that the standard of electrical installations in the rented sector isn't great. Over the past year, with the rush to get mandatory EICRs done on rented properties, some real horror stories have emerged about the state of some places. Not always the fault of the landlords, either. Much of the time the problems have been created by DIY work done by tenants, that the landlords haven't been aware of. Disconnecting smoke alarms is a common issue I've heard of, where tenants have disabled them just to stop them going off as a consequence of smoke from other activities in the house.

TBH, I think that what's being uncovered in this wave of mandatory EICRs is probably almost as bad, but largely unseen, in the non-rented domestic sector. The handful of EICRs I've done in the last year or so (fewer now because of the plague) have revealed some pretty dire installations, and these were all homes owned by EV owners in the main, and not at the cheapest end of the market, where things may well be worse.

Perhaps I shouldn't be surprised, but some of the worst installations have been in fairly new houses. Some have made me wonder how on earth the house was ever signed off in the first place, they were that bad.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks for the advice from everyone. Much appreciated.

Managed to get the car in to the garage today and did half a charge. Everything seemed fine, so I'll order an extension and crack on for now.

Re: the other stuff, I will chase the letting agents about the remedial works. I won't hold my breath though; they're the most useless bunch of lemons going. I'm already arguing with them over a bunch of other things which should have been done before hand-over, but haven't been (and now, apparently, won't be done).

And yeah, I'm not keen on the idea of a house fire. It's a three story town house, and we sleep on the top floor. Long. Way. Down. 😂
 

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Managed to get the car in to the garage today and did half a charge. Everything seemed fine, so I'll order an extension and crack on for now.
I've mentioned them a couple of times on here before. Highly recommend Toughleads. Much better quality than the rubbish you'll find in Wilko or similar, and plenty of helpful information on the website. You can order one with a waterproof socket (if needed). Recommend you get the RCD protected version if the house doesn't have one.

 

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Another vote for Toughleads, pretty much the only company I know of that understands the need for heavy duty extension leads that can accommodate the often larger plug top fitted to many portable charge points.
 
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