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Technically this is second impressions but I forgot about the first test drive I did last year and needed to refresh my mind what it was like.

Baring in mind I am test driving this in Scotlands Highlands, and in the driving rain.

In short, the 40kwh ENV-200 is no better (in performace) than a 24kwh 2015 Leaf, in one important case, worse.
Its worse, because you cannot rapid charge it more than three times in a row before it slows down the charging rate to a trickle.

I drove from Aberdeen to Glasgow to Inverness. I set off from Aberdeen at 9.40am and Arrived back in Inverness at 1040pm.
Total mileage was 328.7
I had to charge 6 times.
I was driving in ECO B mode at 55mph or less. I could barely get 105miles from picking up the Van. The subsequent stops had me down to 70miles then 50 per stop
There was no heat turned on and the fan was on slow in a vague attempt to keep the windscreen from fogging.
The speedo is still a guessometer with it being 4 miles under what you are actually doing.

The rear camera is useless as it needs wiping everything you stop and need to reverse around something. The controls are seemingly further away than when I had my Leaf. The seats are hard as Hendersons. The ride is way more top heavy than I remember.
The carrying space in the back is useful though but not double bed sized useful, more 2 seater sofa useful with headroom.

My verdict.
Not buying. In fact I would be better served to buy a secondhand one and and change and upgrade the battery pack to an 80kwh one.
A van needs to have active cooling for the batteries, it needs to be able to do 250miles in one sitting, proper miles not the lie miles they claim it can do.

I am waiting for the Vauxhall Vivaro-E

Sorry Nissan, I loved you once.
 

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I'm sure we can do "Total mileage was 328.7 I had to charge 6 times." in the 24kWh ENV... Sums up how much of a 'close but no cigar' kind of vehicle the ENV is. Everything about it could be improved with only a relatively small amount of effort. Considering the price of the vehicle new. I love mine but that's not the point.
 

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A van needs to have active cooling for the batteries, it needs to be able to do 250miles in one sitting, proper miles not the lie miles they claim it can do.

I am waiting for the Vauxhall Vivaro-E

Sorry Nissan, I loved you once.

Ok i understand what you are saying BUT you have got to put things into perspective

1. You finish of saying "I am waiting for the Vauxhall Vivaro-E"
Yes i know it has longer mileage, 75kh battery 205 miles on one charge ( lets call that 180 shall we?

2. eNV200 = 40kWh battery 21k ish for top range tenka , e Vivaro 75kw ( i have just been quoted £ 38k for mid range version over 17k difference.

3.You don't buy a small electric van for large 3 to 4 hundred mile journeys.

The NV200 is a small city van you just need to remember that!!

Just saying !!
 

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Whilst I agree rapidgate is a massive problem for longer journeys, I managed to do 250 miles yesterday with 2 rapid charges for 50 minutes & 20 minutes respectively, neither of which was throttled, and just about all the driving was on dual carriageway or motorways, driving at between 60 & 65 mph indicated, arriving back with around 15% left on the battery.

I probably would have needed a 3rd rapid (or spend longer charging) had I still been driving like I used to, which was to always have it in Eco & B modes. Although those allow you to regenerate some wasted power, the downside is that every time you do that, it increases the heating effect on the battery, meaning the throttling of the charging occurs quicker. It's far better not to waste the energy in the first place, so accelerating a bit slower and avoiding regen when going downhill.

Of course to avoid that level of faff, as mentioned above, it should have been better designed in the first place.
 

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Nissan E-NV200 Tekna Panel Van, 24kWh Battery, Kia Soul EV 27 kWh, BMW i3 94ah REX
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I bet I could beat Glyn. I have driven my 24kwh Leaf to Sweden, Germany, France, Belgium, Amsterdam and Scotland and most of England. Russia is no sweat.
Blooming' heck, you must be one of the Saints [...as in.."patience of a ..." ]
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Ok i understand what you are saying BUT you have got to put things into perspective

1. You finish of saying "I am waiting for the Vauxhall Vivaro-E"
Yes i know it has longer mileage, 75kh battery 205 miles on one charge ( lets call that 180 shall we?

2. eNV200 = 40kWh battery 21k ish for top range tenka , e Vivaro 75kw ( i have just been quoted £ 38k for mid range version over 17k difference.

3.You don't buy a small electric van for large 3 to 4 hundred mile journeys.

The NV200 is a small city van you just need to remember that!!

Just saying !!
Hiya.

Still waiting to get my hands on a Maxus or the Vivaro.

Thank you for your observations.

I live in a City. Inverness.

Having had a 24kwh Leaf for 3 years and driven it all around the UK, driven it to Sweden and lived there for a year with it, driven it to France and lived there with it for a year, then took it up to Scotland and lived with it for a year before selling it because the hills here killed the range and my wife's wheelchair took up most of the space in the back to fit in anything else, our needs require a larger vehicle than the Leaf.

Wanting to stay electric I looked around for a viable option.
The ENV 200 24kwh at best can do 80 mile range, with nothing left in the battery. Like our Leaf the ENV200 24kwh it could rapid charge multiple times but without the slower charging or range until it got super hot.
The ENV 200 40kwh at best was doing, on the day I drove it, 105 mile range in one go with 15 mile spare to find a charger. But the longer I drove it, the range got shorter and the charges got longer, much quicker than I hoped.

As I live in the Highlands of Scotland and most of my journeys involve 2-6 hour journeys, return, I think the range and rapid charging ability is quite an important part of our consideration.
Whilst the ENV200 van or combi almost fits our needs, the range and slow charging ability are too much of a deterrent to warrant a purchase.
I had hoped Nissan would have made more of a significant upgrade to the 24kwh version.

We bought a VW Touran to cover the basic requirements of what we hope the ENV 200 combi would do.
The Vivaro-E seems to have the range and space which would suit our needs. But if it means it will be more expensive, then that, will be the only factor which might deter us from going electric, not range issues or rapid charging ability.

One thing I found when driving around Europe was Nissan's slow fast charging rate.
What I mean by that is, 6.6kwh is not enough when most of the charge points available in Europe are 7-22kwh.
Nissan needs to up their specs to be useful to us and change the Chademo to CCS.
 

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The current Nissan products are old designs and standards have moved on rapidly in recent years. Nissan are updating considerably with the Ariya at the end of next year but going SUV like other manufacturers. :mad:
 

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aka Biscitt, Volt Hunter.
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Whilst I agree rapidgate is a massive problem for longer journeys, I managed to do 250 miles yesterday with 2 rapid charges for 50 minutes & 20 minutes respectively, neither of which was throttled, and just about all the driving was on dual carriageway or motorways, driving at between 60 & 65 mph indicated, arriving back with around 15% left on the battery.

I probably would have needed a 3rd rapid (or spend longer charging) had I still been driving like I used to, which was to always have it in Eco & B modes. Although those allow you to regenerate some wasted power, the downside is that every time you do that, it increases the heating effect on the battery, meaning the throttling of the charging occurs quicker. It's far better not to waste the energy in the first place, so accelerating a bit slower and avoiding regen when going downhill.

Of course to avoid that level of faff, as mentioned above, it should have been better designed in the first place.
This interested me. Are you saying that driving with Eco off is more efficient? Genuinely interested in learning how to get the most out of my 40kWh ENV that has been converted into a campervan.
 

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This interested me. Are you saying that driving with Eco off is more efficient? Genuinely interested in learning how to get the most out of my 40kWh ENV that has been converted into a campervan.
I think it can be, but you need to be more disciplined with the right foot, so that you can spend more time coasting without using up too many electrons but also not regenerating.
 

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As I live in the Highlands of Scotland and most of my journeys involve 2-6 hour journeys, return, I think the range and rapid charging ability is quite an important part of our consideration.
Whilst the ENV200 van or combi almost fits our needs, the range and slow charging ability are too much of a deterrent to warrant a purchase.
I had hoped Nissan would have made more of a significant upgrade to the 24kwh version.
With hindsight, having become aware of and suffered from rapidgate since getting a 40kWh Evalia in January 2019, I wish I'd stuck with the 24kWh one for another 18 months, as that could do at least 7 rapid charges in a row before incurring throttling. With Muxsan in the Netherlands now doing extender batteries, I could have ended up with a bigger total battery capacity and no rapidgate, all for a lower overall cost.

So why not look at getting a cheap second hand 24kWh and getting a Muxsan upgrade? They even have a CCS option!
 

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Nissan E-NV200 Tekna Panel Van, 24kWh Battery, Kia Soul EV 27 kWh, BMW i3 94ah REX
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With hindsight, having become aware of and suffered from rapidgate since getting a 40kWh Evalia in January 2019, I wish I'd stuck with the 24kWh one for another 18 months, as that could do at least 7 rapid charges in a row before incurring throttling. With Muxsan in the Netherlands now doing extender batteries, I could have ended up with a bigger total battery capacity and no rapidgate, all for a lower overall cost.

So why not look at getting a cheap second hand 24kWh and getting a Muxsan upgrade? They even have a CCS option!
You don't have to trot over to The Netherlands now as Cleevely Electric Vehicles | Electrical Vehicles | Gloucestershire near Gloucester are fitting Muxsan kits right now.
 
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