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Hi all. Does anyone know if the Enyaq 60 has selective regen braking?
I know that if you select the drive package you get the steering wheel paddles that allow you to select regen, but can you select any other way such as in menus?
I'm due to change company car and the 60 is on my list but I can't add any options to it unfortunately. I currently have the Leaf 40 and I love the one pedal driving.
 

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Skoda Enyaq iV80 (2021)
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Hi Silky. I've had my Enyaq for three weeks now :) Yes, of course it has regenerative braking - the default is 'automatic', which means if there's nothing in the way ahead of you and it doesn't see any junctions or speed restriction signs, it just coasts if you take your foot off the throttle. It will start braking automatically if you get too close to the car in front, if it detects a reduced speed limit, or when coming up to a junction/roundabout. For general driving, I let the regenerative braking do most of the work so I hardly have to touch the brake pedal. Also clever is the fact that, if you have programmed a satnav route, it knows when - for example - you will be turning into a side road and will slow the car accordingly. You have some other options: one is to change from 'D' position to 'B' on the 'gearstick' which then puts on maximum regenerative braking as soon as you take your foot off the throttle... don't use it myself, but I guess it's useful for crawling in heavy traffic. The paddles on the steering wheel also override the automatic regenerative braking which you can set manually (choice of three strengths)... I don't see the point of this as it only works when you don't have your foot on the throttle: as soon as you hit the accelerator pedal it defaults back to automatic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Silky. I've had my Enyaq for three weeks now :) Yes, of course it has regenerative braking - the default is 'automatic', which means if there's nothing in the way ahead of you and it doesn't see any junctions or speed restriction signs, it just coasts if you take your foot off the throttle. It will start braking automatically if you get too close to the car in front, if it detects a reduced speed limit, or when coming up to a junction/roundabout. For general driving, I let the regenerative braking do most of the work so I hardly have to touch the brake pedal. Also clever is the fact that, if you have programmed a satnav route, it knows when - for example - you will be turning into a side road and will slow the car accordingly. You have some other options: one is to change from 'D' position to 'B' on the 'gearstick' which then puts on maximum regenerative braking as soon as you take your foot off the throttle... don't use it myself, but I guess it's useful for crawling in heavy traffic. The paddles on the steering wheel also override the automatic regenerative braking which you can set manually (choice of three strengths)... I don't see the point of this as it only works when you don't have your foot on the throttle: as soon as you hit the accelerator pedal it defaults back to automatic.
Hi Nick123, thats brilliant, thanks for the info!
 

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Skoda Enyaq iV80 (2021)
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If it's a company car and you have to do a few hundred miles for any reason, then the one option you must insist on for your Enyaq is the fast-charging package (€525 here in 'Euroland'). Otherwise, you'll be stuck at 50kW charge speed which means it'll take you well over an hour to charge at the motorway services (from a few percent back up to 80% battery). The 'charge package' boosts the rate to 100kW for an Enyaq 60.
 

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I'm wondering whether the 100kw charging package is really worth it in the UK? I've not seen any 100kw chargers around apart from the very expensive Ionity ones, so we're pretty much limited to 50kw by the infrastructure anyway
 

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Skoda Enyaq iV80 (2021)
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Hi IroniqEV, I guess it depends if you're planning to use the car for longish distances (>200 miles) or not. I think the charging pack is certainly worth it if you're planning to do some mileage on the motorway network. OK, Ionity is expensive, but here in Europe there's not a lot of choice on the motorways apart from Ionity... I assume it'll get better as more EVs come on stream and more players enter the charging market. At least you can pay by the kW in the UK: here in France, the electric meters Ionity use are not yet officially been calibrated so they are not allowed to sell by the kW! So, Ionity have opted for the same rate but per minute instead of per kW - great if you can charge at >60kWh/h but with the standard' Enyaq at the 50kW limit the price is even higher than in other countries :( Finland is the same as France, all other countries in Europe can charge by the kW. Skoda have made a big mistake in my opinion on this 50kW limit: I've got the iV80 which has a 82kW battery... what an earth are they thinking about, limiting the charge rate to 50kW??
 

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Sounds like Ionity have rolled out chargers much further where you are, which is good. Here in UK, almost every CCS charger is limited to 50 KW anyway (apart from Tesla). Hopefully that will change over the next few years
 

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Skoda Enyaq iV80 (2021)
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Oh! - most of the 'autoroute' Ionity chargers here are up to 350kW. HMG needs to do something if it wants EVs to take off in the UK; I don't know why Ionity have adopted such a limited policy in the UK, but I assume the answer is complex and bureaucratic. Nobody who needs to travel between major UK cities will tolerate such long waits to recharge at motorway services limited to 50kW, so I assume such people won't be investing in an EV for the moment... except a Tesla: perhaps HMG have shares in Tesla? :)
 

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I opted for the 100kw option as there are quite a few 100kw chargers already around and Ecotricity / Gridserve are upgrading all of their chargers to add rapid speeds.

There is also the resale value. In 3-4 years a 100kw car will resell for more than the ~£500 it costs to upgrade, compared to the 50kw version

Have a look at the zap map app and filter by CCS charger. My screenshot shows all of the CCS chargers 100kw or over
146189
 

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Skoda Enyaq iV80 (2021)
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Hi MrHudson, the charging network in England doesn't look too bad after all, then. I ordered an EnyaqiV80 with 125kW charging but they delivered me a max 50kW model... the dealer made an error. I'm been waiting nearly two weeks now for this issue to be resolved: I hope it's just a matter of a software upgrade, but I don't know why it is taking so long to get an answer on this out of the dealer and Skoda :(
With the Ionity tariff in France being €0.79 per minute rather than €0.79 per kW as it is in nearly all other countries, there's even more reason to go for faster charging. The problem is the calibration of Ionity's power meters... France seems to think that charging per minute is fine, but I bet the French authorities (Norme Française) haven't calibrated the timing clocks either.
 

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My replacement company car Enyaq 60Loft has just arrived, base spec just with quartz grey paint so ive only the B selection on the gearlever. This seems to give similar regen to the maximum B5 setting on the Oulander PHEV its replacing, i used to run on B5 all the time, its a bit like engine braking from a large 4 stroke single motorcycle
 

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Škoda Enyaq 60
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I'm wondering whether the 100kw charging package is really worth it in the UK? I've not seen any 100kw chargers around apart from the very expensive Ionity ones, so we're pretty much limited to 50kw by the infrastructure anyway
I didn’t do my homework and paid for the 100kw package as I do a lot of business miles. I’ve never come across a 100kw charger so a waste of money for the moment. In this weather it takes my enyaq 60 1.5 hours to get a 100 mile charge in a 50 kw charger. It’s not suitable for a company car for me.
 

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Enyaq iV 80
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I can hear your disappointment, and I'm sorry the car isn't what you were hoping for. I have to say that this is not my experience. The weather in much of the UK is quite mild at the moment, but even in the cold 100 miles from what should be a full charge sounds low. I've just driven 330 miles in 5 degrees, needing less than half that, and arriving with plenty to spare. Only one of those was an ultra rapid. Like you say, not so many around at the moment, but other threads on this forum discuss rapid hubs anticipated in the first half of this year, and most of these are likely ultra rapids. So hopefully one on your regular routes soon.
 

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Skoda Enyaq Sportline 80
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I didn’t do my homework and paid for the 100kw package as I do a lot of business miles. I’ve never come across a 100kw charger so a waste of money for the moment. In this weather it takes my enyaq 60 1.5 hours to get a 100 mile charge in a 50 kw charger. It’s not suitable for a company car for me.
Where are you charging? There are quite a few 100+kW chargers out there. As the Enyaq is a 400v system, you need to find chargers which can put out enough Amps at 400v to hit 100kW which can be a bit of a minefield. Many 100kW chargers will only do 100kW on 800v cars and not 400v cars - you need ones that can do 250A.

I've got a Enyaq 80 with 125kW charging and at MFG the other day managed to max out their chargers at 99kW as they can do 250A on their 150kW chargers.
 

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Škoda Enyaq 60
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I can hear your disappointment, and I'm sorry the car isn't what you were hoping for. I have to say that this is not my experience. The weather in much of the UK is quite mild at the moment, but even in the cold 100 miles from what should be a full charge sounds low. I've just driven 330 miles in 5 degrees, needing less than half that, and arriving with plenty to spare. Only one of those was an ultra rapid. Like you say, not so many around at the moment, but other threads on this forum discuss rapid hubs anticipated in the first half of this year, and most of these are likely ultra rapids. So hopefully one on your regular routes soon.
Thanks and Fingers crossed. When I charge to 100% (around 2 hours on 50 kw) I can get just under 200 miles. I Spoke to Škoda customer service today and they’re happy with the car being charged at 100%. The reversing camera is worse than a £20 eBay buy so they have advised it goes back to the supplier for comment. No infra red so screen is black the minute the daylight drops and in daylight it’s like an old 128k digital camera. Hopefully it’s just an error on the install.
 

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I found I had to increase the brightness and contrast in my car, the settings it came with were very dark as soon as it was dull. To do this engage the camera by selecting reverse, or press the assist button. Then with your finger near the screen you should see three coloured dots, press that and it brings up the contrast and other options. Adjust to your preference. Hope this helps.
 

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Skoda Enyaq iV80 (2021)
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I can hear your disappointment, and I'm sorry the car isn't what you were hoping for. I have to say that this is not my experience. The weather in much of the UK is quite mild at the moment, but even in the cold 100 miles from what should be a full charge sounds low. I've just driven 330 miles in 5 degrees, needing less than half that, and arriving with plenty to spare. Only one of those was an ultra rapid. Like you say, not so many around at the moment, but other threads on this forum discuss rapid hubs anticipated in the first half of this year, and most of these are likely ultra rapids. So hopefully one on your regular routes soon.
Here in France, there are rapid charges around but mainly on motorways (and expensive); I don't think it's that different in the UK. So, if you have a long journey that doesn't use the motorways, then I understand Smithiesmith's disappointment. My concern too is what happens to these fast charging stations when they get busy with multiple users? I've heard rumours that they start reducing the power depending on the occupancy. So far, I've been alone when fast-charging (see photo) but does anyone know what will happen in the future when I'm unlikely to be the only car in the station??

Car Wheel Tire Land vehicle Vehicle
 

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Škoda Enyaq 60
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Still waiting on my home charger being installed but I sometimes have to queue for over an hour to get onto a fast charge. And then wait the 2 hours to charge up to 100%. Apart from that it’s a nice drive.
 
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