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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello speak-EV community,

I’m relatively new here so I hope this is ok...

Did you know there are still less than 500k EVs (BEV+PHEV) on UK roads today?

... with another forecast 35.5million left to convert!

I am an EV owner and enthusiast like most of you. Also like many of you, I am keen to see more EVs on UK roads, which has had me thinking.

I have been exploring a hunch about accelerating EV adoption. I feel prospective EV owners could be better served at the research stage - namely understanding quickly and easily that an EV would be a good fit for them. The longer it takes to work this out the longer we have to wait to get cleaner air etc. And as we move towards early adopters and the early majority this is time we just cannot afford!

Here are some interesting sound bites:

It takes on average 15 -16 weeks to decide what car to buy (J.D. Power Automotive Marketing Roundtable)

‘Additional hesitancies to make the leap highlight the need for greater knowledge about the capabilities and benefits of electric vehicles.’ (RingGo 2020 survey)


Keen to hear your thoughts with a short (~3 mins) survey: Electric Car Ownership Research.

Also welcome a longer chat if you are so inclined.

Many thanks
 

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iD.3 Family, Moonstone Grey. (On order)
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The real problem is lack of supply of bevs in the marketplace. Why, for example, does VW sell the ID3 and the Golf at the same time? Surely the ID3 is a bev Golf? If they had stopped selling the Golf and started selling the ID3 only, then they would immediately see an increase in the usage of bevs. Unfortunately, I can't see the battery supply issue being solved anytime soon. The world can't absorb that massive increase in battery usage, either from a production pint of view, or, even worse, from an environmental point of view.

Also, the majority of car drivers in the UK (and presumably the world) drive much cheaper used vehicles than new cars. Even with an ID3 being £30000 approx starting price, that is still many times more than the average used car sale price.
 

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EVs are like people going to Mars.
You have to get there and then you have to live there (or die).
With EVs you have to get the car and then keep it alive (with power).

As with Mars are EVs: the first part is basically done - the second is a work in progress.

Almost every published article, video, TV programme on EVs brings up the charging problem, and it's a big part of whether an EV is right for someone and if so which one. Yet this, and most other surveys, just ignore it in favour of the motor show/showroom glamour of getting a new car.

The ownership question also has no option for "Have owned an EV but don't at present." :)
 

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Previously it was range and charging facilities, the range in the early EVs was pretty paltry and charging facilities too few and far between, charging facilities still are in many parts of the country. I'm sure an enthusiast will pop up and say, well most people only need to drive under 30 miles a day so could use one and get hire cars, which is true, but most people want a car which is multi-purpose, they want to be able to go on day trips, visit relatives, take the car on holiday, use it for the odd business trip. They don't want to plan their journeys and travel around the needs of their car, and they don't want the hassle and cost of getting hire cars.

The range issue has now been fixed, the latest long-range EVs are quite impressive but they're horribly expensive and despite the emphasis on potential fuel cost savings you need to drive a lot of miles and own the car for quite a long time until the fuel cost saving covers the extra up front cost of an EV, and it's along time until you start coming out ahead.

They'll get there, just needs the prices to fall, like the quote - the future is already here, it's just not very evenly distributed.
 

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I very nearly bought an EV recently, but concerns about the real life range, particularly in difficult conditions and realistic motorway use, put me off. The final killer was the apparent dissatisfaction with the national charging network - or lack thereof - and there was no way that I could regard an EV as a viable replacement for my ICE.
 

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Renault Zoe 50
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EVs have a supply problem, not a demand problem.

OEMs have to make more cars before we start worrying about who’s going to buy them.
 

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Renault Zoe 50
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I very nearly bought an EV recently, but concerns about the real life range, particularly in difficult conditions and realistic motorway use, put me off. The final killer was the apparent dissatisfaction with the national charging network - or lack thereof - and there was no way that I could regard an EV as a viable replacement for my ICE.
What’s your average weekly mileage?
 

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EVs have a supply problem, not a demand problem.

OEMs have to make more cars before we start worrying about who’s going to buy them.
If it was purely a supply problem then over the past 10 years we'd have seen the early EV models like the Nissan Leaf, the iMiEV and all the rest being in huge demand, the manufacturers would have been working flat out to build new factories to meet demand. Didn't happen. The early EVs didn't sell in huge volumes, that's why the manufacturers didn't build that capacity. That's also why governments provide all the incentives - the demand isn't great enough at current prices.

Recent EV models, with better performance have driven an increase in demand and some short term supply problems, but shortages are mostly seen for the latest model offering the best price/performance. Within a short space of time after launch there's plenty in stock and at the dealerships.

Yes supply needs grow, but it depends on the manufacturers being able to reduce the prices and/or other support to boost the volumes purchased.
 

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Renault Zoe 50
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If it was purely a supply problem then over the past 10 years we'd have seen the early EV models like the Nissan Leaf, the iMiEV and all the rest being in huge demand, the manufacturers would have been working flat out to build new factories to meet demand. Didn't happen. The early EVs didn't sell in huge volumes, that's why the manufacturers didn't build that capacity. That's also why governments provide all the incentives - the demand isn't great enough at current prices.

Recent EV models, with better performance have driven an increase in demand and some short term supply problems, but shortages are mostly seen for the latest model offering the best price/performance. Within a short space of time after launch there's plenty in stock and at the dealerships.

Yes supply needs grow, but it depends on the manufacturers being able to reduce the prices and/or other support to boost the volumes purchased.
I was talking about the current situation.

However the fact my old Zoe sold for more than I paid for it speaks to the demand even two years ago.

Right now all manufacturers aren’t making enough to meet demand.

Why don’t they make more? Because they’re mainly losing money on EVs.

So they are waiting for the BOM cost to fall and limit sales to that which offsets their fleet emissions.
 

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Blue Etron 2019, 2014 Nissan Leaf
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Right now all manufacturers aren’t making enough to meet demand.

Why don’t they make more? Because they’re mainly losing money on EVs.

So they are waiting for the BOM cost to fall and limit sales to that which offsets their fleet emissions.
Battery cells and other components are short supply.

Until more manufacturing is built and operational, they can't make more EVs.

And there is a catch beyond this. As technology is changing rapidly, no one really wants to build a plant as it will be obsolete in a few years.
 

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And it’s also a “model” problem. There needs to be a viable choice of BEVs across all sectors of vehicle body types before you can expect truly mass adoption. It’s too easy just now to be put off by the lack of estates, large (and not mega expensive, highly spec’ed) utility-type SUVs, and even at the small end of the market choice is fairly limited.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
EVs are like people going to Mars.
You have to get there and then you have to live there (or die).
With EVs you have to get the car and then keep it alive (with power).

As with Mars are EVs: the first part is basically done - the second is a work in progress.

Almost every published article, video, TV programme on EVs brings up the charging problem, and it's a big part of whether an EV is right for someone and if so which one. Yet this, and most other surveys, just ignore it in favour of the motor show/showroom glamour of getting a new car.

The ownership question also has no option for "Have owned an EV but don't at present." :)
Your point about "ignore it (charging) in favour of the motor show/showroom glamour of getting a new car" resonates with me. I see adoption like a funnel, and all the glamour (what we see the most of) is at the tail end of the funnel. Things like charging and what that means for the compatibility of EV for your life (ergo the top-most/earlisest part of the funnel) is the motivation for this survey!

Curious, why did you get rid of your EV? 😅

p.s. for the survey purposes please go with 'ev owner' 😀
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I very nearly bought an EV recently, but concerns about the real life range, particularly in difficult conditions and realistic motorway use, put me off. The final killer was the apparent dissatisfaction with the national charging network - or lack thereof - and there was no way that I could regard an EV as a viable replacement for my ICE.
Would be happy to take another look with you to see if it just might work 😀
 

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Curious, why did you get rid of your EV? 😅
Several reasons:
Despite having long range (Kona 64kWh) it couldn't manage certain trips and public charging in those directions is horrible. SWMBO would simply not undertake such journeys alone and I considered it pretty daft to try it myself.
(When I ordered it 2 years ago I thought charging would get better - it didn't (in the places I need).)
I wasn't doing enough mileage to ever save the fuel costs.
I wasn't doing enough mileage to ever recover the additional carbon costs of manufacture.
It was a bit big for our needs, so our smaller car was being used more than I'd hoped.
It was very expensive to buy and was still worth a lot, so it made sense to cash in before it dropped much more.

It was a great car, but just not for us.
Until public charging gets better no EV will be right. A PHEV would be perfect, if there were smaller ones.

p.s. for the survey purposes please go with 'ev owner' 😀
I already did it as not an owner - sorry.
 

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Hello speak-EV community,

I’m relatively new here so I hope this is ok...

Did you know there are still less than 500k EVs (BEV+PHEV) on UK roads today?

... with another forecast 35.5million left to convert!

I am an EV owner and enthusiast like most of you. Also like many of you, I am keen to see more EVs on UK roads, which has had me thinking.

I have been exploring a hunch about accelerating EV adoption. I feel prospective EV owners could be better served at the research stage - namely understanding quickly and easily that an EV would be a good fit for them. The longer it takes to work this out the longer we have to wait to get cleaner air etc. And as we move towards early adopters and the early majority this is time we just cannot afford!

Here are some interesting sound bites:

It takes on average 15 -16 weeks to decide what car to buy (J.D. Power Automotive Marketing Roundtable)

‘Additional hesitancies to make the leap highlight the need for greater knowledge about the capabilities and benefits of electric vehicles.’ (RingGo 2020 survey)


Keen to hear your thoughts with a short (~3 mins) survey: Electric Car Ownership Research.

Also welcome a longer chat if you are so inclined.

Many thanks
"Thank you for participating in our quick electric vehicle (EV) questionnaire, we are on a mission to accelerate (pardon the pun) the adoption of greener electric solutions like electric cars.
Your responses are voluntary and will be confidential. Responses will not be identified by individual. All responses will be compiled together and analyzed as a group. "

So who is "we"?
Who are we submitting data to?
 
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