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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All- We were planning to do a EV car drive on mountains. Before that wanted to understand a few things that I shoud keep in mind while making this travel
1.Will the car give lesser range in mountains. For eg: in plains if the range of the car is 200 miles/Kms, will it be lesser in mountains.
2. Should we maintain a constant speed to have a better charge range?
3. anything else?
 

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Kia e-Niro MY20 64 kWh - Gravity Blue
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Just drive it. Going up consumption will be through the roof and going down it'll be negative. Net result is that kWh / 100 km are lower than on motorways. My average consumption on mountain roads is about 14 kWh / 100 km, I drive an e-Niro.

If you can, use max regen so you can use the accelerator to control speed without touching the brake. It is very relaxing, if you have proper control over your right foot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Just drive it. Going up consumption will be through the roof and going down it'll be negative. Net result is that kWh / 100 km are lower than on motorways. My average consumption on mountain roads is about 14 kWh / 100 km, I drive an e-Niro.

If you can, use max regen so you can use the accelerator to control speed without touching the brake. It is very relaxing, if you have proper control over your right foot.
Thanks for the detailed help.
 

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Depends, on motorways at 110 it's about 17.5 (less in winter of course) and in mixed use (city, 80 km roads) it's about 14 / 15.
 

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2. Should we maintain a constant speed to have a better charge range?
Constant speed. Don't be silly. Imagine you're cycling up that mountain. It's hard work. Expecting to go the same speed uphill as on the flat will be drawing huge amounts of power just to keep the cruise control happy. Most EVs have some form of display of instantaneous power drawn / regenerated. That'll give you an idea of what speed would be appropriate for going uphill. Downhill is not a problem. Use re-gen in preference to braking.
 

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VW e-Up! 2020
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Uphill you have to gain the elevation and that takes certain amount of energy. Whether you gain it with high power in a short time or low power in a long time only matters if motor efficiency heavily depends on load/power, which in EVs it doesn't really. The cycling comparison doesn't work because human body is much less efficient once you come near or cross the aerobic threshold.

You should certainly keep your uphill speed below the point that would have you using friction brakes before corners because that's just wasted energy. Then, as regeneration isn't 100 % efficient, you may want to climb slowly enough that you can coast into most corners rather than regenerating. For most hilly roads this would be slow enough that going any slower than that doesn't gain much anymore.
 

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My drive to work is mostly flat, but the last few km's are on hilly roads.
I found that if I take the uphill parts a bit slower than I would usually do with my ICE car, and on the way back home, go the downhill a bit faster, the total consumption is on par with a flat road.
Of course I'm using regen downhill, and driving faster but still safely and in control.

Just try to take the uphill parts easier, and the downhill as usual (or faster, safety permitting) with regen, and you should be fine... I guess it really depends on the roads and height difference.
 

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In the Leaf, I drive in the Peak district frequently and I'm always amazed at how the consumption really changes very little from driving on the level.

My real problem is that, as I leave my Mum's house which is high up, I can't regenerate anything on the way down, then I have to climb back up to get on the Motorway.
 

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I'd just add the obvious warning that your consumption going uphill will be far higher than on a f;lat route. So if your destination is 10 miles away, and you have a really steep climb to make, you may struggle if you start out with 15 miles remaining in your GOM!
In my Ampera I descended from the highest point on A6 near Shap, 430m above sea level, down to Kendal, 100m above, so a descent of 330m. Did this on regen, all the other cars were braking hard most of the way. By road that's a 9.8 mile trip. I regenerated 15 miles range back into the battery! I don't know what electrical range I used going up, as I was on petrol in my Rex & battery was empty to being with!
 

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At least you don't have to worry about your ICE getting low on power due to the lower partial pressure of oxygen from the altitude.
 

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Ah, but if you buy an Ioniq, you just might get the god-awful rather frightening !BANG! as the battery-enclosure tin-can's noisily on the descent!!! :) Hyundai now know about this, and are putting some kind of pressure-relief valve in, or making the cases stronger, or something...

I guess there's a need to avoid getting moisture trapped inside, while letting air pressures equalise. Not quite sure how the EV mfrs square this circle... Condensation, anyone? :eek: Maybe use the aircon to dry the inlet air first? :geek:
 

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I used better route planner on some dreaming about a little trip to the Stelvio Pass.
It was interesting to see how much battery was used in theory going up, from a camp site , to a waypoint at the very top, and then how much used going down to the next major town .

Then of course it gives you overall trip details which you could compare to same distance B-Road UK cross country road tips in the cotswolds/sussex.
 
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My daily drive is 50km (25km each way) but involves climbing 600m from my home to the town where I work. I average 13kWh/100km doing that journey in a Renault Twingo, but do I keep an eye on the power on the way up. I don't go over 30kW and tend to try and keep it under 20kW. I also use a max speed of 80km/h, which is the speed limit on that road.

I haven't had the car long, so haven't done many journeys on the flat, but those I have done suggest an average more like 12kWh/100km on flat ground.
 

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Consumption is worse in hilly or mountainous driving compared to driving in flat areas.

My commute is 6.6 miles. Going to work I start at 200m elevation, climb to 230m then straight down the hill at 70mph to around 30m elevation.

Currently going to work I average 5.0 miles/kWh (approx 12.4 kWh/100km). Coming home is about 2.1 miles/kWh (approx 29.6 kWh/100km), that's starting with a cold car and driving at 70mph back up the hill. For comparison, my longterm average, over 1100 miles since early December is 3.4 miles/kWh (about 18.3 kwh/100km).

Hills completely confuse the car's range estimate. Expect the predicted range to look terrible as you go uphill but remember you'll get some of it back as you go down the other side when you regen.

If it's narrow twisty mountain roads have fun, although I'm slightly ashamed to say I don't find that kind of driving quite as much fun anymore, because the lack of gear changing and one pedal driving in an EV make it so easy!
 

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Kia e-Niro MY20 64 kWh - Gravity Blue
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Currently going to work I average 5.0 miles/kWh (approx 12.4 kWh/100km). Coming home is about 2.1 miles/kWh (approx 29.6 kWh/100km), that's starting with a cold car and driving at 70mph back up the hill. For comparison, my longterm average, over 1100 miles since early December is 3.4 miles/kWh (about 18.3 kwh/100km).
So your average commute consumption is less than your average overall consumption. Then why do you say mountainous roads increase consumption?
 

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She didn't.
6.6m = 10.645 km so outward @.124 kW/km = 1.32 kWh used. @ .296 kW/km outward = 3.15 kWh used. Total trip = 4.47 kWh used.
Long-term "flat" @ .183 kW/km the 21.29 km trip would use 3.9 kWh .
 
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