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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All
After some advice please.....
I am changing company cars soon and we have to go with an EV car or a Hybrid, but I dont particularly like the idea of a Hybrid, IE having to pay electric and petrol - I know it will probably balance out but feels paying for both makes little sense (but maybe my need for advice)

I have looked at the Peugeot E-2008 and it looks a good option, with good mileage range but really could do with some advice, my commute is a 40 mile (30 miles on motorway) to work and then same back so 80 miles a day with no way to charge at work, so if I needed charging it would mean I have to stop every day on way home which clearly I want to avoid.

Can anyone who has one of these or experience with an EV help with below?

1. would this easily cope with this commute and not give me any range anxiety :)
2. When I am home and need to charge, I would look to do this every day but again this worries me it could get costly, or does it only charge to 100% and then auto stop, so if for example I have only used 50% of the battery, it would only charge me 25kwh to fill back up, not 50 kwh.


Sorry if these questions seem silly but I really am torn as when I have committed I am tied to a 4 year contract, the fuel currently costs me £200 per month as I have a diesel and get 55-60mpg out of it.

Equally if anyone has advice on a better EV car for this sort of trip, I am open to any ideas..... I have looked at the Plug in BMW X1 but as mentioned above paying petrol and charging feels a lot more effort and cost as the range is 25 miles which means I would only ever get just over 1/2 way to work and need petrol for rest and home, or maybe it doesnt work that way.

Any advice welcome
Thanks
 

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Hyundai Ioniq 28
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Welcome to SpeakEV. Your commute is perfect for a BEV and almost any of today's offers would manage 80 miles per day even in deepest winter with heating on. The savings on fuel would be really noticeable. I would estimate that you would save at least £100 per month. On your figures you are probably spending £7.50 per day on diesel alone for that commute. In an EV, using a normal home tariff, and not a specialised overnight one, that would cost around £3.50 per day for 80 miles, and on a special overnight EV tariff from companies such as Octopus that cost could be reduced to as low as £1.50 per day.

The cost is for just the energy supplied from your home wall box to the car. Topping up from half full to 100% in a 50 kWh car would be 25 x your electric unit cost. If you charge at a commercial unit on a road trip the cost is higher of course and can be double, or more, than the cost of a home charger. Incidentally, I find it odd that your company insists on a plug car but doesn't offer work charging. Is that a lack of parking issue or just an oversight?

As to your choice of car the Peugeot E-2008 is very popular but there are many alternatives that would be in that same budget and size category. I would agree with your doubts over a PHEV option as your personal commute falls far short of maximum savings and would be running on liquid fuel almost all of the time. I would also recommend that you consider a longer range EV such as the Kia and Hyundai offers, as well as Nissan, VW and MG. You do not mention your car use for domestic and leisure trips. Sometimes a slightly larger car with more boot room and longer range is more suitable overall rather than just as a commute car. But then again, many people have a second vehicle to cover such use.

Good luck with your move to the EV world.
 

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Well, it states a range of 206 miles range for the Peugot so your daily commute is easily done.

Yes, it will only charge to 100%.

Can you charge at home?
 

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I would say if you can charge at home then the e2008 would be a pretty good option. You could be putting in c£9 of electricity per week, so say a max of £40 per month, you can see what your saving are.

Check also to see if Peugeot are still offering a free Pod Point installation, if not some utility companies will do deals for home charging.

The key to this is to have the charging point installed before you get the car or else you are searching for chargers near to you to meet your range requirements.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you both for the really helpful replies. I have been so nervous.

The issue with work is car parking space it's always a problem but as only few have company cars they seem to be able to get away with specify eV cars only which I am happy with, I just didnt want to be in a position where I have to charge on way home from work.

It is my intention to put a 7kw charger at home so I plug in each night but I wanted to ensure it didn't charge me all night as that would work out expensive. My car is generally parked up for 11 hrs a night.

From a personal point of view it is more local driving and holidays twice a year which would need a stop as usually do Cornwall which is 350 miles one way

I will take a look at the other cars but again we have a budget sadly so not all eV cars are available

Thanks again its been most helpful as I know they advertise more milage but finding someone who actually owns a eV car is better as I know from mpg history it's never what they advertise and having to stop each evening for half hour to charge would be costly and frustrating

Thanks
 

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As it is a company car - how is the 'fuel' paid for (business mileage and private mileage)?

HMRC have various rules and regs for home charging of company vehicles - the details of your company car scheme should really cover this.
 

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The car gives you a deferred charging option. So for example, you could set the timed charge to start at 1am and jump into the car at 7am and drive off. You will soon get used to how much electricity it needs and adapt.

For now the Pug only starts on an timer but doesn't end on one, you have to stop the charge.

There are or will be other options out there to do this. It is the one weakness with the Pug, but other cars may have similar issues.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
As it is a company car - how is the 'fuel' paid for (business mileage and private mileage)?

HMRC have various rules and regs for home charging of company vehicles - the details of your company car scheme should really cover this.
Hi, I get paid 9p per mile in fuel today, i dont have a fuel card. I am not sure what the new rate is for EV mileage yet but would need to check this out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
My cars max range is 210. I wouldn't have an issue driving to Cornwall, it just requires a bit of clever planning to charge on a rapid once on the way down and once on the way back.
Thanks, this is good to know - so it continues to draw electricity even when the battery is fully?
That is a shame and a slight offput to be honest.

I am looking at the below 3 if anyone has any views, the Peugeot was my preference but the Kia and Mustang go further, but the Mustang is RWD which I didnt want.

MakeDescriptionCO2Cap IdP11DPreference
FordMustang Mach-e Estate 198kW Standard Range 68kWh RWD 5Dr Auto
0​
93073​
40294.99​
3​
KIAE-niro Electric Estate 150kW 4+ 64kWh 5Dr Auto
0​
93910​
39340​
2​
PeugeotE-2008 Electric Estate 100kW GT Premium 50kWh 5DrAuto
0​
96144​
39574.99​
1​
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The car gives you a deferred charging option. So for example, you could set the timed charge to start at 1am and jump into the car at 7am and drive off. You will soon get used to how much electricity it needs and adapt.

For now the Pug only starts on an timer but doesn't end on one, you have to stop the charge.

There are or will be other options out there to do this. It is the one weakness with the Pug, but other cars may have similar issues.
Do you have one of the Peugeot e2008 then? if so what sort of range do you get and style of driving?
 

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Thanks, this is good to know - so it continues to draw electricity even when the battery is fully?
That is a shame and a slight offput to be honest.

I am looking at the below 3 if anyone has any views, the Peugeot was my preference but the Kia and Mustang go further, but the Mustang is RWD which I didnt want.

MakeDescriptionCO2Cap IdP11DPreference
FordMustang Mach-e Estate 198kW Standard Range 68kWh RWD 5Dr Auto
0​
93073​
40294.99​
3​
KIAE-niro Electric Estate 150kW 4+ 64kWh 5Dr Auto
0​
93910​
39340​
2​
PeugeotE-2008 Electric Estate 100kW GT Premium 50kWh 5DrAuto
0​
96144​
39574.99​
1​
No >>>>>>>>>>>>.. an EV cannot draw electricity when it is full. It will only take electrons, and charge you money via your meter, when it is delivering them. You only pay for what you take and there is no way that electricity can keep flowing if it has nowhere to go.

From the weird choice of three above I would choose the Kia. But would actually want to have the VW ID4 on that selection list.
 

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my commute is a 40 mile (30 miles on motorway) to work and then same back so 80 miles a day with no way to charge at work, so if I needed charging it would mean I have to stop every day on way home which clearly I want to avoid.
The projected range of the e-2008 is about 190 miles, isn't it? Why would you have to stop to charge on the way home from work every day? You should be able to do two days' commuting and then charge at home at the end of the second day.

With regard to getting a charger fitted before the car arrives, most installers want proof that you've either got (or at least ordered) an EV before they'll proceed with the work (I'm going through this at the moment). But as long as the lead time of the car is less than or the same as the lead time of the installer then you shouldn't have a problem. If there is a difference, you could always charge from a 3-pin socket until the charger's installed (I don't know if Peugeot give you a 3-pin charging cable as standard).

From your shortlist, if range is the main factor, I'd go for the e-Niro.
 

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I am looking at the below 3 if anyone has any views,
Since finding available rapid chargers can be ... interesting at present, I always say get the biggest battery you can. I've been looking at a trip from Southampton to only Brixham and back and charging has the potential to be horrible - the rapids down there all seem to be single units at pubs and Lidls, which is not great.

Bear in mind that the ranges people talk about and advertise are from 100 to 0%. As with petrol, that last 30-40 miles is not somewhere you want to go under normal use. Say 40 miles at 4 miles/kWh, so 10kWh. That means your sensibly useable battery is 40 for the Pug and 54 for the Kia. At 4m/kWh that's 160 miles and 216 miles.

So as money isn't a problem I'd look hard at the Niro.
 

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I have an e-208 which has the same battery as the e-2008. Although advertised as a 50kWh battery, only 45kWh is usable. The e-208 is proving to not be too efficient, especially in winter and at motorway speeds. You may only get 100 miles of range when it’s cold and wet and you’re travelling at 60mph or more.

Will the budget not stretch to a Tesla Model 3 SR+ ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I have an e-208 which has the same battery as the e-2008. Although advertised as a 50kWh battery, only 45kWh is usable. The e-208 is proving to not be too efficient, especially in winter and at motorway speeds. You may only get 100 miles of range when it’s cold and wet and you’re travelling at 60mph or more.

Will the budget not stretch to a Tesla Model 3 SR+ ?
Thanks for this, we are allowed to consider Tesla 3 but its RWD which I really am not interested in based on previous experience with a RWD car.
 

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but its RWD which I really am not interested in based on previous experience with a RWD car.
:eek:

If you leave the driver aids turned on the Tesla is as safe and easy to drive as any FWD EV.
 
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