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Hi all,

I'm a new member here, so first post please be gentle! :)

I am lobbying the government to agree a workable domestic street-parking EV charging system matters in terms of meaningful climate action AND hitting the Government's own 2030 EV target. There are many UK households (like ours) that don't have off-street parking. As it stands, proper charging points generally can't / won't be installed by charge-point suppliers because the Dept for Transport (DfT) and local authorities (LA) inc. my local council (Leeds City Council (LCC)) won't allow access to the installation grants or explicit permissions to put one in. It seems you can legally charge a full EV from a domestic point, but it is much, much slower, taking hours/days - impractical and unworkable at scale, putting most people off. Opening up national grants and permissions would enable more trials of the various options and country-wide roll out at scale.

I have created a petition to get this discussed in parliament and have the support of my local MP, many councilors, etc. however, the current count (31/03) is 84 - rubbish! I need likeminded people to sign and share in order to hopefully make this happen. Thanks in anticipation...

Extend Electric Vehicle (EV) charging grants to those without off-street parking - Petitions (parliament.uk)
This is where we need manufacturers/highway companies/governments/DNOs to come together and push the wireless charging. Streches of new road to be laid with wireless charging, traffic jams become charging situations (no range anxiety), charge and drive (increasing overall max miles in a journey), not have to rely on making bigger/more effcient batteries, bi directional wireless charging (some cars give to the grid, some cars take)...

I think old Elon has this in his back pocket with his smart tunnels..

Living in terrace/flats wouldnt come into it then!
 

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If councils were more accommodating with allowing cable channels to be run across pavements it would help. It is not a big job to channel across a pavement and insert a narrow galvanised cable slot, much like the narrow cast iron drains that run across some pavements. This would allow those who are able to park outside their terraced houses to just run the cable in the slot when they need to charge, removing the trip hazard. Holland has a system that allows residents to install charging connector boxes right at the kerb, with a closed lid and the cable coming out of the edge of the kerb. They don't cover the cost of this but do allow residents to do the work with no special permissions, as long as an approved pavement box is used.

The only council I know of here that is enlightened enough to allow cables to run across pavements inside rubber cable protectors is Hampshire, and, AFAIK, there have been no reports of any issues with these. Given that road works often mean that cables are run across pavements and highways in these protectors without a problem, and as they are commonplace at festivals, location shoots and other outdoor events, I can't see any good reason for refusing to allow them.
 

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If councils were more accommodating with allowing cable channels to be run across pavements it would help. It is not a big job to channel across a pavement and insert a narrow galvanised cable slot, much like the narrow cast iron drains that run across some pavements. This would allow those who are able to park outside their terraced houses to just run the cable in the slot when they need to charge, removing the trip hazard. Holland has a system that allows residents to install charging connector boxes right at the kerb, with a closed lid and the cable coming out of the edge of the kerb. They don't cover the cost of this but do allow residents to do the work with no special permissions, as long as an approved pavement box is used.

The only council I know of here that is enlightened enough to allow cables to run across pavements inside rubber cable protectors is Hampshire, and, AFAIK, there have been no reports of any issues with these. Given that road works often mean that cables are run across pavements and highways in these protectors without a problem, and as they are commonplace at festivals, location shoots and other outdoor events, I can't see any good reason for refusing to allow them.
Simply, is the space outside your house yours to park in? How can you guarantee that you can use that exclusively? Times that by thousands of households. The biggest opposition to on-street is opposition from other people on your road who will not like you getting something their not.
 

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Simply, is the space outside your house yours to park in? How can you guarantee that you can use that exclusively? Times that by thousands of households. The biggest opposition to on-street is opposition from other people on your road who will not like you getting something their not.

This does seem to vary a great deal from one area to another. Our first house was an end of terrace where there was no allocated parking on the road outside, but there was an unwritten agreement that we each only parked outside our own homes, and as it was a cul-de-sac and no one else had any reason to park there this worked OK. We each had space for about two cars, and if we were expecting visitors 9 times out of ten a quick word with a few neighbours would sort out one or two extra spaces. This worked well, but was largely down to all of us getting on together, helped by the fact that the estate was married quarters for mainly RN personnel and some of us civvies.

Our second house was mid-terraced and when we moved in parking was a free-for-all, plus we had loads of people visiting the pub up the road that would take up a lot of the spaces. After a year or so of almost open warfare the council agreed to create "residents only" parking bays and we ended up with a situation that was similar to that our first house, but I think that only worked because, as neighbours, we had been united in the fight to get parking outside our homes, so were already on the same side.

It all hinges on rules applied by the council, the way neighbours get on with each other and the biggest variable of all, human nature. It would be nice to think that everyone would be tolerant and avoid causing problems, but it is inevitable that there will occasionally be one or two arseholes that just screw things up for no reason other than that they can.

In my experience of having been a Parish Councillor, and trying to intervene in parking disputes, trying to get rules enforced is very much a measure of last resort. If people can be persuaded to understand the needs of others and be a bit more tolerant there is a far better chance of a long term solution working. Sadly, it seems that there is a growing tendency for people to want enforced rules to cover everything, rather than just come to an amicable compromise with others.
 

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This does seem to vary a great deal from one area to another. Our first house was an end of terrace where there was no allocated parking on the road outside, but there was an unwritten agreement that we each only parked outside our own homes, and as it was a cul-de-sac and no one else had any reason to park there this worked OK. We each had space for about two cars, and if we were expecting visitors 9 times out of ten a quick word with a few neighbours would sort out one or two extra spaces. This worked well, but was largely down to all of us getting on together, helped by the fact that the estate was married quarters for mainly RN personnel and some of us civvies.

Our second house was mid-terraced and when we moved in parking was a free-for-all, plus we had loads of people visiting the pub up the road that would take up a lot of the spaces. After a year or so of almost open warfare the council agreed to create "residents only" parking bays and we ended up with a situation that was similar to that our first house, but I think that only worked because, as neighbours, we had been united in the fight to get parking outside our homes, so were already on the same side.

It all hinges on rules applied by the council, the way neighbours get on with each other and the biggest variable of all, human nature. It would be nice to think that everyone would be tolerant and avoid causing problems, but it is inevitable that there will occasionally be one or two arseholes that just screw things up for no reason other than that they can.

In my experience of having been a Parish Councillor, and trying to intervene in parking disputes, trying to get rules enforced is very much a measure of last resort. If people can be persuaded to understand the needs of others and be a bit more tolerant there is a far better chance of a long term solution working. Sadly, it seems that there is a growing tendency for people to want enforced rules to cover everything, rather than just come to an amicable compromise with others.
Where does it end though? Councils putting personal infrastructure outside people’s houses. Would people expect a Sheffield stand putting there for a bicycle? It wouldn’t happen. There has to be another way
 

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Where does it end though? Councils putting personal infrastructure outside people’s houses. Would people expect a Sheffield stand putting there for a bicycle? It wouldn’t happen. There has to be another way

There are already lots of places with residents only parking on the streets outside terraced homes, so this is not anything new or out of the ordinary. An extreme example is that a friend of mine pays a small fortune every year for the parking space outside his Regents park home, as do many other people who choose to live in city areas where parking is scarce.

There's no need for councils to put in any infrastructure at all, if any is needed all that needs to be allowed is for homeowners or charging service providers to be allowed to make reasonable provision for charging cars on the street, without causing additional hassle to anyone else.

I can't see this being a major problem at all. I was talking to a chap a couple of years ago who was charging his Leaf on the road outside his home, with the council's blessing. They (Hampshire Council) gave him permission to use a yellow and black rubber cable protector to reduce the tripping risk where his cable crosses the pavement. AFAIK he's still charging like this, with no problems. Obviously he has absolutely no rights to do this, it works solely because he's not inconveniencing anyone else, he has not cost the council any money and his neighbours aren't so bloody minded as to try and stop him doing it.
 

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Wireless charging is way too expensive and inefficient to be viable outside of maybe a few very niche situations.
Of course any new concept that has not been invested in will initially be expensive. Again inefficiency will be down to investment, think about the LED and how it has grown from what it was.. wireless charging on the QEII would work as well as other high traffic areas.. think of the additional income private companies could make with this infrustructure. Think how many thousands of people with range anxiety on these routes would charge at these inflated rates to guarantee getting home in heavy traffic.
 
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