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Kia eNiro 4+, White
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Discussion Starter #1
Just as a word of warning / caution to those people considering putting PPF on their cars.

I was considering putting PPF on my new car (note considering as is quite expensive). I decided to look at the insurance implications before doing so.

What I have found is that only a subset of insurers will cover electric vehicles and that prices vary widely.
Then add PPF and the price shoots up, with many of the remaining insurers refusing cover completely.
Additionally you can't actually select PPF as a predefined modification - so it means talking to each to talk about PPF. Most treat PPF as a vinyl wrap and shy/run away from it.

After I gave up and decided not to use PPF, I got an email from (surprisingly) the cheapest option I had who said
"I have had a look for you and can confirm you do not need to declare the Paint Protection Film as a modification as this isn't enhancing or changing the performance"

The problem I have is that most insurers / underwriters don't like PPF which cuts down immensely the number of possible insurers come re-insure time. Now I am going to put a ceramic coat on the car which will preclude any future PPF option (yeah - I know they do different things) as PPF won't stick to ceramic (unless you polish off the ceramic)

Shame really - although this has saved me a few grand in PPF

Sean
 

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I'm sure it wouldn't even occur to most people to declare PPF. Seems pretty far-fetched that an insurer would turn down a claim for not declaring it.
 

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Kia eNiro 4+, White
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Discussion Starter #4
If an insurer has a policy that says they wouldn't insure a car with PPF then they are entitled to decline their clients claim which would put the client in deep doodoo. They can't decline a 3rd party claim but could decline their own client and revoke the insurance. Not a situation I wanted to be in. PPF is according to all but one broker / insurance company a declarable modification
 

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The problem with film or indeed ceramic coating is that if a panel needs replacing or repainting it becomes a non-standard, more difficult and thus more expensive job. You may not think something is a mod but if it affects the likelihood of needing repair or increases the cost of repair - it's a mod!

Insurers like cars that are bog-standard so they can accurately predict repair costs.
 

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The problem with film or indeed ceramic coating is that if a panel needs replacing or repainting it becomes a non-standard, more difficult and thus more expensive job. You may not think something is a mod but if it affects the likelihood of needing repair or increases the cost of repair - it's a mod!

Insurers like cars that are bog-standard so they can accurately predict repair costs.
Ceramic coating isn’t a mod, otherwise we gonna have to start declaring wax
 

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Ceramic coating isn’t a mod, otherwise we gonna have to start declaring wax
It probably depends. If it's a DIY thing then no. If you've had it done professionally and need the 'new' panel(s) redoing the same, and try to claim for it, your insurer may well tell you to take a walk if they weren't aware. (And might put a black mark on your record to boot.)
 

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It's just a sticker.

If you have a ding, just remove the sticker and don't start demanding the paint shop replace the PPF.

That's your problem.
 

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Exactly. They’d not even notice and just repair it as a standard panel unless you started crying about it. Like most things, you can avoid trouble by not bringing it upon yourself in the first place.
 
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