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Hi all,
I am still not an EV driver, but considering it. I have been studying ev-database website quite a lot (EV Database), very useful site.
On a sleepless night mid-Feb, I extracted and plotted some of its data. I am not particularly good in statistics, but I could see a broad correlation between price, range and max charging rate (higher price = higher range = higher max charging rate).
It strikes me as a potential new inequality in the making. In comparison, with petrol/diesel cars I don't think range is a significant problem and my perception is rather higher price = bigger car = higher fuel consumption = higher running cost.
What do you think?
128423

tab delimited table attached for people who would like to check the data.

By the way, am I the only one to find shocking that only Tesla cars can be charged at Tesla Supercharger (my understanding of Tesla Network - charging guide & cost, another of my favorite sites these days) ? A bit as if a major petrol station brand was only serving let's say Mercedes cars ? You might sometime grumble about price but you can fill a petrol car at any station. I heard already some people's anwer "you need to think differently, in the future you won't use a car to do long travel....". Well, it looks to me like it is rather going to be, "in the ev future, only the rich people will be able to use a car to do long travel".... I would be happy to be proven wrong :)
 

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I could see a broad correlation between price, range and max charging rate (higher price = higher range = higher max charging rate).
Well, yeah. What's the big surprise there? Pay more - get more.

It strikes me as a potential new inequality in the making.
Nothing new, just the usual inequality in a new suit.
EVs aren't connected to a rise in communism.

You might sometime grumble about price but you can fill a petrol car at any station.
Only public ones. (In fact I think only MSAs are required to be 'public', other ones could probably be selective about their customers subject to not breaking discrimination laws.) If you drove into, say, a coach or lorry depot in a diesel car and demanded to fill up they'd tell you where to go in no uncertain terms.
The Supercharger network is private. You want to use it, buy a Tesla.
 

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I am not particularly good in statistics, but I could see a broad correlation between price, range and max charging rate (higher price = higher range = higher max charging rate).
As mikegs suggests, that's partly just what you might expect. But actually there are good hard reasons for it. The battery is the most expensive part of an EV so it is inevitable that higher price = higher range. Furthermore, the rate of charging is proportional to the size of battery (like trying to fill a container with a fair hose), usually called 'C' (so 1.5C charging means a 50kWh battery can be filled at 75kW), so higher range = higher max charging rate.
 

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@Pouic most of us refill from our domestic supply and whilst we all want more en route and destination charge points, no one knows how necessary and profitable they will be in the future. So Tesla have done the right thing for their customers now by giving them support now and confidence to buy their cars now. Tesla may well make their Supercharger network open to all one day but for now they are in competition with the ICE makers so I can only see them doing deals with EV only maker in the near future.
 

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Hi all,
I am still not an EV driver, but considering it. I have been studying ev-database website quite a lot (EV Database), very useful site.
On a sleepless night mid-Feb, I extracted and plotted some of its data. I am not particularly good in statistics, but I could see a broad correlation between price, range and max charging rate (higher price = higher range = higher max charging rate).
It strikes me as a potential new inequality in the making. In comparison, with petrol/diesel cars I don't think range is a significant problem and my perception is rather higher price = bigger car = higher fuel consumption = higher running cost.
What do you think?
View attachment 128423
tab delimited table attached for people who would like to check the data.

By the way, am I the only one to find shocking that only Tesla cars can be charged at Tesla Supercharger (my understanding of Tesla Network - charging guide & cost, another of my favorite sites these days) ? A bit as if a major petrol station brand was only serving let's say Mercedes cars ? You might sometime grumble about price but you can fill a petrol car at any station. I heard already some people's anwer "you need to think differently, in the future you won't use a car to do long travel....". Well, it looks to me like it is rather going to be, "in the ev future, only the rich people will be able to use a car to do long travel".... I would be happy to be proven wrong :)
By the time ICE are gone and mostly a small amount of “classics” only, 2050 onwards I’m sure many long range BEV will be available. If you at that point don’t want to pay for a 400 mile range when 150 is fine for 99% of your needs then expect to have to pay higher prices to charge to travel beyond 80 miles away from your home.
 

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Hi Pouic, can I start by saying how much I love your data? I do however think though that you've interpreted it in a half-glass-empty sort of way.

Looking simplistically, there's two ways to use a car. One is to potter about a bit during the day - school, shops, nearby work. Every electric car fulfills that need. Range, charge rate and charge power don't matter if you've organised home or work charging.

The other way (looking simplistically, remember!) to use a car is to travel a long distance, where you have to stop and charge on your journey. Your range determines how far you have to go before your first charge, but after that the important thing is what you've called 'max charge rate'. Ignoring queuing time, this is the thing that determines the total time you're stuck at a charging point in your complete journey. The performance of your car is therefore shown by its green triangle.

At £20k, your green triangles are no higher than 110, but by £30 they've reached 350, and by £37k they've reached 450. It then would cost another £53k to reach the maximum of 520.

My interpretation is this - if you want a pottering car, just buy whatever is comfortable and safe enough for you. None of the data matters. All electric cars are fast enough and cheap enough to run, so the numbers don't matter. If you want a long distance car you're going to have to pay a bit more, but for not a great deal more you'll get something that's got a really good charge rate - you can get a great performing car for only 50% more.

The other thing to consider is this - with time, all of the data will move to the left as electric cars become cheaper, also resulting in much lower second-hand prices. When this happens, car ownership will become a lot more egalitarian than it is now?

Or am I imagining that my glass is half full?

But oh, yes, really good job with the data : o )
 
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