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Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV Design 2.4
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Discussion Starter #1
I could probably do with Richi help here.

I am very new to all this.

At home we have a Podpoint charger when we charge up we sometimes see EV ranges ranging between 35 to 44 miles on the guess meter dependant on the usage the day before. We thought at this time of year with everything switched off we would see around 28 EV miles on a good day, however we are achieving nearer 35 -36 EV miles consistently, these are actual miles, yesterday we we traveling 3/4 of the journey at 60mph along the M6 the 30mph zone in Birmingham still 35 -36 EV miles in fact we still had 2 miles in reserve when we arrived.

We have also noticed when on holiday and charging up yesterday at the daughters, if we use the 'Granny Charger' the guess meter units revert to km, I then have to reset the unit on the central screen, it never happens with the Podpoint.
 

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richi.uk
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28 miles would be on the low side for a MY2019/20 car with the bigger battery. 35 sounds decent. I can see 30 on my MY2014.5 with the original battery (yours is configured as ~20% bigger).

I've heard of the dash reverting to km, and I dimly remember something about a firmware update for it. Ask your dealer if you're due any recalls or service campaigns.
 

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Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV Design 2.4
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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for your reply Richi, I am slowly getting head around all this technology.

One this which really surprised us, towing our 1500kg caravan 180 miles each way, on the way down I set the speed limiter to 50 mph and let the battery run down we covered 12 miles towing and had 5 miles in reserve, I naively assumed when I hit the Charge Mode on the toll road the battery would charge up, however over the 180 miles it only gained a 3 - 4 extra miles, but always maintained a charge for the hills.

On the way back i being a little wiser I let the battery run down to 15 miles then hit the charge button, used the EV in the 30 mph areas and accelerating off junctions and roundabout and 55mph in Charge Mode on the return journey overall approximately 27 mpg, strangely it seemed to preformed better towing at 55mph than 50 mph.
 

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richi.uk
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Sounds like you're getting the hang of it.

I don't have a chart to hand, but I would guess the engine can generate more torque at 55 mph than at 50. What happens when you press CHRG when in parallel mode is that it runs the engine at the widest throttle setting it can, then bleeds off the excess torque you don't need to drive the car—by charging the battery. (SAVE mode does the same thing, but stops and starts the engine to keep the battery state roughly where it was when you pressed the button.)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
That interesting I will give it a try next time, you never know it might give me better towing mileage
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Sounds like you're getting the hang of it.

I don't have a chart to hand, but I would guess the engine can generate more torque at 55 mph than at 50. What happens when you press CHRG when in parallel mode is that it runs the engine at the widest throttle setting it can, then bleeds off the excess torque you don't need to drive the car—by charging the battery. (SAVE mode does the same thing, but stops and starts the engine to keep the battery state roughly where it was when you pressed the button.)
Forgot to say, towing with the PHEV in EV mode from junction/roundabout etc the torque is just instant, unlike our 2017 2.0 diesel automatic Ford Kuga or other 2.0 diesel car we have owned. Realy loving this PHEV
 
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Discussion Starter #7
28 miles would be on the low side for a MY2019/20 car with the bigger battery. 35 sounds decent. I can see 30 on my MY2014.5 with the original battery (yours is configured as ~20% bigger).

I've heard of the dash reverting to km, and I dimly remember something about a firmware update for it. Ask your dealer if you're due any recalls or service campaigns.
Car booked in for software upgrades 13th August
 

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Discussion Starter #8
PHEV back from the dealers no new updates required, as regards the centre display changing from miles to km it did not happen at the dealers, they are contacting Mitsubishi if they know of this problem.

They checked the battery all good.
 

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and 55mph in Charge Mode on the return journey overall approximately 27 mpg, strangely it seemed to preformed better towing at 55mph than 50 mph.
Strange, my previous BMW 530 gave 35 mpg at 60 (er-hem :eek: ) and the preceding Passat TDi 41 mpg. Admittedly diesel has more energy per litre but why is the Mitsubishi so poor?
 

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richi.uk
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Two reasons:
1. You missed or didn't grok the phrase "charge mode." Normal economy without net battery use at a steady 55 should be more like 45–50 mpg.
2. The Outlander has a much larger frontal area than a 530 or Passat. Air resistance at higher speeds will get you every time (that's why I always say to prospective buyers, "If you don't need an SUV, buy a plugin Prius, an Ioniq PHEV, or a full EV.")
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Two reasons:
1. You missed or didn't grok the phrase "charge mode." Normal economy without net battery use at a steady 55 should be more like 45–50 mpg.
2. The Outlander has a much larger frontal area than a 530 or Passat. Air resistance at higher speeds will get you every time (that's why I always say to prospective buyers, "If you don't need an SUV, buy a plugin Prius, an Ioniq PHEV, or a full EV.")
Richi I think you friend is totally missing the point 27 mpg is not bad for any tow vehicle be it a BMW 530 or Passat Diesel towing a 1500 kg caravan plus a heavy mobility scooter and walking aids, our old Ford Kuga on just achieved 28 mpg towing.
 
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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for your reply Richi, I am slowly getting head around all this technology.

One this which really surprised us, towing our 1500kg caravan 180 miles each way, on the way down I set the speed limiter to 50 mph and let the battery run down we covered 12 miles towing and had 5 miles in reserve, I naively assumed when I hit the Charge Mode on the toll road the battery would charge up, however over the 180 miles it only gained a 3 - 4 extra miles, but always maintained a charge for the hills.

On the way back i being a little wiser I let the battery run down to 15 miles then hit the charge button, used the EV in the 30 mph areas and accelerating off junctions and roundabout and 55mph in Charge Mode on the return journey overall approximately 27 mpg, strangely it seemed to preformed better towing at 55mph than 50 mph.
Carried out the exactly same journey 3 weeks ago now everything is loosening up a bit 2500 miles and a bit more experience on the way down recorded brim to brim fill 28.3mpg, however on the way back it was very windy and had to keep speed down to 50mph, plus had to switch on the electric heater which compromised my battery range and fuel consumption but still managed again brim to brim 26.5mpg.
 

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How do you switch on the electric heater while driving?
 

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But that uses the heat from the ICE when it can - it would be silly just to use the electric heater when there is so much waste heat being produced by the ICE. So how can you say you use the electric heater alone while driving?
 

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richi.uk
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But that uses the heat from the ICE when it can - it would be silly just to use the electric heater when there is so much waste heat being produced by the ICE. So how can you say you use the electric heater alone while driving?
When it can—yes. So if the engine's not running, in general it will use the electric heater, unless the A/C ECU and /or PHEV-ECU judges the demand to be too great, in which case it will command the engine to run anyway. The Eco and EV-priority buttons affect the weighting used in the decision. (Any latent heat in the engine coolant lines will come into the cabin via a thermostatic 4-way valve.)
 

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Discussion Starter #17
When it can—yes. So if the engine's not running, in general it will use the electric heater, unless the A/C ECU and /or PHEV-ECU judges the demand to be too great, in which case it will command the engine to run anyway. The Eco and EV-priority buttons affect the weighting used in the decision. (Any latent heat in the engine coolant lines will come into the cabin via a thermostatic 4-way valve.)
Well Richi
I did not know that, so let me get it clear, if I switch on the electric heater whilst in charge mode I will also get some additional heating into the cabin via the 4 way valve
 

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There is no way to “switch on the electric heater”. That’s the point I was trying to make. You set the desired temperature and the car decides how it will provide heat. If the ICE is warm on a trip, it will use that first
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Our work straight away if we switch it on or through the mains
 
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